BN.com Gift Guide

The Eurocentric Conception of World Politics: Western International Theory, 1760-2010

Overview

John Hobson claims that throughout its history most international theory has been embedded within various forms of Eurocentrism. Rather than producing value-free and universalist theories of inter-state relations, international theory instead provides provincial analyses that celebrate and defend Western civilization as the subject of, and ideal normative referent in, world politics. Hobson also provides a sympathetic critique of Edward Said's conceptions of Eurocentrism and Orientalism, revealing how ...

See more details below
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (12) from $22.72   
  • New (8) from $28.35   
  • Used (4) from $22.72   
The Eurocentric Conception of World Politics: Western International Theory, 1760-2010

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$15.49
BN.com price
(Save 44%)$28.00 List Price

Overview

John Hobson claims that throughout its history most international theory has been embedded within various forms of Eurocentrism. Rather than producing value-free and universalist theories of inter-state relations, international theory instead provides provincial analyses that celebrate and defend Western civilization as the subject of, and ideal normative referent in, world politics. Hobson also provides a sympathetic critique of Edward Said's conceptions of Eurocentrism and Orientalism, revealing how Eurocentrism takes different forms, which can be imperialist or anti-imperialist, and showing how these have played out in international theory since 1760. The book thus speaks to scholars of international relations and also to all those interested in understanding Eurocentrism in the disciplines of political science/political theory, political economy/international political economy, geography, cultural and literary studies, sociology and, not least, anthropology.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"With his survey of two and a half centuries of conceptualizing world politics, Hobson launches an extended, comprehensive polemic against what he defines as Eurocentric theory … This is a book for the most dedicated readers - it is recommended as a fertile source of material to argue over."
R. P. Peters, University of Massachusetts, Boston, Choice
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781107604544
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • Publication date: 3/31/2012
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 350
  • Product dimensions: 6.10 (w) x 8.98 (h) x 0.75 (d)

Meet the Author

John M. Hobson is Professor of Politics and International Relations at the University of Sheffield. His publications include Everyday Politics of the World Economy (2007), co-edited with Leonard Seabrooke; The Eastern Origins of Western Civilisation (2004); Historical Sociology of International Relations (2002), co-edited with Steve Hobden and The State and International Relations (2000).

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

1. Introduction: constructing Eurocentrism and international theory as Eurocentric construct; Part I. 1760–1914: Manifest Eurocentrism and Scientific Racism in International Theory: 2. Eurocentric imperialism: liberalism and Marxism, c.1830–1914; 3. Eurocentric anti-imperialism: liberalism, c.1760–1800; 4. Racist anti-imperialism: liberalism and cultural-realism, c.1850–1914; 5. Racist imperialism: 'racist-realism', liberalism, and socialism, c.1860–1914; Part II. 1914–1945: Manifest/Subliminal Eurocentrism and the High Tide of Scientific Racism in International Theory: 6. Anti-imperialism and the myths of 1919: Eurocentric Marxism and racist cultural-realism, 1914–1945; 7. Racist and Eurocentric imperialism: racist-realism, racist-liberalism, and 'progressive' Eurocentric liberalism/Fabianism, 1914–1945; Part III. 1945–1989: Subliminal Eurocentrism in International Theory: 8. Orthodox subliminal Eurocentrism: from classical realism to neorealism, 1945–1989; 9. Orthodox subliminal Eurocentrism: neo-liberal institutionalism and the English school, c.1966–1989; 10. Critical subliminal Eurocentrism: Gramscianism and world-systems theory, c.1967–1989; Part IV. 1989–2010: Back to the Future of Manifest Eurocentrism in Mainstream International Theory: 11. Imperialist and anti-imperialist Eurocentrism: post-1989 'Western-realism' and the spiritual return to post-1889 racist-realism; 12. Imperialist Eurocentrism: post-1989 'Western-liberalism' and the return to post-1830 liberal paternalist Eurocentrism; Part V. Conclusion: Mapping the Promiscuous Architecture of Eurocentrism in International Theory, 1760–2010: 13. Constructing civilization: global hierarchy, 'gradated sovereignty' and globalization in international theory, 1760–2010; Bibliography; Index.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)