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The Event
     

The Event

by Martin Heidegger
 

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Martin Heidegger’s The Event offers his most substantial self-critique of his Contributions to Philosophy: Of the Event and articulates what he means by the event itself. Richard Rojcewicz’s elegant translation offers the English-speaking reader intimate contact with one of the most basic Heideggerian concepts. This book lays out how the event is to be

Overview

Martin Heidegger’s The Event offers his most substantial self-critique of his Contributions to Philosophy: Of the Event and articulates what he means by the event itself. Richard Rojcewicz’s elegant translation offers the English-speaking reader intimate contact with one of the most basic Heideggerian concepts. This book lays out how the event is to be understood and ties it closely to looking, showing, self-manifestation, and the self-unveiling of the gods. The Event (Complete Works, volume 71) is part of a series of Heidegger's private writings in response to Contributions.

Editorial Reviews

Phillip Braunstein

"Heidegger is struggling to articulate his thinking, and many sections in this work are illuminating to some of his most difficult discussions in the Contributions and his thinking about Greek metaphysics, language, and poetry and philosophy." —Phillip Braunstein, Loyola Marymount University

From the Publisher
"Heidegger is struggling to articulate his thinking, and many sections in this work are illuminating to some of his most difficult discussions in the Contributions and his thinking about Greek metaphysics, language, and poetry and philosophy." —Phillip Braunstein, Loyola Marymount University

"What is most remarkable about Richard Rojcewicz’s translation is its timeliness.... As a translation, the volume is better than fine and it has no doubt benefitted from Rojcewicz and Vallega-Neu’s translation of Beiträge zur Philosophie (Vom Ereignis)." —Continental Philosophy Review

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780253006967
Publisher:
Indiana University Press
Publication date:
12/27/2012
Series:
Studies in Continental Thought
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
336
File size:
3 MB

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Read an Excerpt

The Event


By Martin Heidegger, Richard Rojcewicz, Friedrich-Wilhelm v. Herrmann

Indiana University Press

Copyright © 2009 Vittorio Klostermann, Frankfurt am Main
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-0-253-00696-7



CHAPTER 1

The first beginning


A. The first beginning [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]


cf. The History of Beyng {GA69}

cf. The Overcoming of Metaphysics {GA67}

cf. [Meditation {GA66}

cf. Contributions to Philosophy [Of the Event] {GA65}

cf. Lecture on truth 1930: On the Essence of Truth {GA80}

cf. Being and Time {GA2}


cf. lecture courses:

Winter semester 1931–32: On the Essence of Truth. Plato's Cave Allegory and Theatetus {GA34}

Summer semester 1932: The Beginning of Western Philosophy (Anaximander and Parmenides) {GA35}

Winter semester 1934–35: Hölderlin's Hymns "Germanien" and "Der Rhein" {GA39}

Summer semester 1935: Introduction to Metaphysics {GA40}

Summer semester 1936: Schelling: On the Essence of Human Freedom (1809) {GA42}

Winter semester 1937–38: Truth. Basic questions of Philosophy: Selected "Problems" of "Logic" {GA45}


1. The first beginning

[TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] essentially occurs as the beginning.

Trueness is the truth of being.

Truth is "the goddess," [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII].

Her house is well rounded, not closed, never (trembling) dissembling heart but, instead, disclosing illumination of everything. [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] is in the first beginning the concealed—trueness: the concealing preservation of the cleared-open, the bestowal of the rising up, the permitting of presence. Truth is the essence of being.

* * *

"Being" already "is" in the disentanglement (and indeed essentially occurs in the indiscernible disentanglement). The twisting free of being.

Of course it will at first be difficult to renounce beyng out of the twisting free and at the same time to experience truth as something that "is more fully" than any cognitive interpretation of its essence allows.


2. [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]

Disconcealment: when and where does it exist and happen? Can we ask such a question if we know that [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] is being itself? But [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]. Certainly; this implies, however, that being itself essentially occurs in an originary way throughout time-place, although being cannot be pinned down by indicating a position therein.

Yet does not the question become ever unavoidable: how would [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] be taken up and preserved? Surely it is unavoidable, but this taking up (originating essential occurrence of the human being as [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]) is not in the first place the grounding of [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], which essentially occurs only in its proper inceptuality, i.e., only inceptually. Therefore the experience of the inceptual is decisive, and so are, moreover, the renunciation of an explanation and the localization in a place. All this merely raises questions, because we think in terms of beings and are little able to match up to being, which we, following the designation, at the same time take and seek as an "object."

But is the [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], apparentness, not then the same as [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] Yes and no. In it still the essence of the emergent but at the same time the inclusion of onlooking, whereby the [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] itself becomes that at which a directing is directed. This, however, does not at once introduce anything of the "subject" and the subjective. What is essential here is only that unconcealedness comes under the yoke of the [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], i.e., the act of onlooking, whereby the onlooking does nevertheless not posit and create the [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] but, instead, perceives it.

Yet this indeed seems to have been said already, in the dictum of Parmenides which refers to [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] in its belonging to being. Is [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] not here already [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], thus [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]? Precisely not; precisely that step lies far off. Instead, [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] and [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] are named in their belonging to [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]. And this is essentially different from the coupling of [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] and [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] under the yoke of the [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII].

But the [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] as [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] moves into the domain of making possible and thus of explaining—conditioning—producing—[TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] is [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]. Yet [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] is not inceptually [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII].

With this step toward the [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], being turns into a being, into the highest being of such a kind that it causes being—not into the being which is inceptually.

These are not the same: the being in the highest sense (the highest being) and that which, as pure being, is never a being and yet precisely for that reason remains the pure essential occurrence and inceptually and uniquely "is"—more inceptually than that [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] of the [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] in Parmenides.

But then, and before all else, we must consider: [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] is the disconcealment of concealment and occurs intrinsically in the abyssal and the enigmatic. And that is not simply a barrier placed in the way of human understanding; on the contrary, the abyssal character is the essential occurrence itself—the act of beginning.

Indeed the question of the relation to [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] and to the beginning still remains—undetermined in the first beginning, and in the other beginning: Da-sein.


3. Errancy

is the extreme distorted essence of truth.


4. [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (Plato)

In the Pseudo-platonic [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (definitions):

413c6f.

[TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII].

Unconcealedness—comportment in affirming and denying. "Knowledge" of what is unconcealed.

413c4f.

[TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII].

Belief, the correct anticipation that something actually is as it shows itself to someone. Stability of attitude.


5. [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] out of [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]

i.e., out of the ground and as the ground.

What sort of "unity"?

Cf. Kant, unity of standing together, Critique of Pure Reason, B §16.

"together"—[TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII].

"stand"—[TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII].

standing—

"con-stant"—[TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII].


6. Truth and being for the Greeks (Said and unsaid)

(cf. s. s. 42, p. 34f.)

The experience of being as [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] does not contradict the thinking based on the unsaid and the concealed.

But [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]—here also already the start of the destruction of [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII].


7. [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]

In [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] the essence of Hellenism is preserved. How should this preservation not also eventuate in the essence of the truth which such a people was allowed to experience? [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]—the unconcealed—says that what is true is not the truth; truth as truth also, and precisely, includes the concealed or, rather, the concealment of the concealed, a concealment that allows only a certain measure of disconcealment to emerge into truth.

Here is hidden a determination of inceptual thinking, namely, that it is from the beginning prepared to acknowledge the irreconcilable and the self-excluding, in which this thinking surmises the unity of these as the ground, yet without being able to experience this in a questioning. (the essence of the [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]!)

In this dual essence of [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] are to be sheltered the [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] and [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] and their relation; here is the ground for the [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]—[TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] Heraclitus B 50), the [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (B 54), [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (B 8), and the [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (B 93). All these are now thought mostly in the modern sense, in terms of consciousness, i.e., dialectically, and are thereby also misinterpreted.


8. [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] and "space and time" Space and spatial representation and thought (cf. e.g., the essence of the remembrance of the past)

It is said that we use spatial representations in all our thought, even with regard to the "spiritual," non-spatial domain.

In truth, we do not use the spatial, but we do not recognize only the so-called merely spatial as a darkening and deterioration of the cleared open realm—i.e., of the ecstatic character of the truth of beyng, a character that can never be grasped either through ordinary time or through the banal representation of space.

In truth, this ignorance of the essence of space and time is of course already very old and almost inceptual, for the essential occurrence of truth in its beginning had to remain ungrounded. Therefore, even in the process of explaining, place and time came into the forefront, and ever since the advent of modern metaphysics "nature" was completely detached from [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] and was transformed into the objectivity of a mode of representation or into the so-called "biological" in the mode of representation of the equally vague and confused lived experience of the stream of life.

The unbounded twaddle of this way of representation is inadequate to the inceptual experience of beyng.


9. [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] and the first beginning ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII])

What essentially occurs in the first beginning, what is more inceptual in it, is [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII],

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

And precisely this, the fact that [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] is the beginning, and thus the essential occurrence of being and the most strange, for "truth" was reinterpreted long ago (since Plato, but, through the lack of grounding in the first beginning, given as advancement).

Therefore recollection must attempt to find immediately in [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] the first basis for the inceptuality of being and to extract [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] once and for all from the previous misinterpretation. But here resides the danger, that [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] for its part is now posited as the beginning and [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] merely attributed to it. But it is [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] itself that is more inceptual.

As soon as the interpretation of [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] is for once unfolded sufficiently, as soon as the essence of "truth" is (for the first time) brought beyond adaequatio back to unconcealedness as the essential occurrence of beings, as soon as [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] and [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] are loosened from the fetters of metaphysics, and, above all, as soon as the inceptuality of the beginning and its historicality are grasped, we could then venture to name [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] as the inceptual essence of the first beginning.

The result is then again the necessity of thinking [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] on the essential ground of [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] in the sense of an already determined [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], i.e., of [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] in the essential sense of appearing, coming forth.

[TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] then becomes the essential origin of the [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]; at the same time, however, since the saying of the essence of being has been relinquished to the [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] turns into the determination of a still nearer domain, one that is more constant and yet is changing: "nature."


10. [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]

(its concealed essential occurrence is: concealment as (event))

(cf. On the beginning)

All too completely have we forgotten up to now that in [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] the [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], the concealing, is "positive." The α- appears to bring into the open and to make meditation on the [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] superfluous.

Thus it is in the first beginning and indeed by necessity. Why? Because the emergence, the disconcealment, first gives the open realm, and this latter first gives the excess—nevertheless [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]. Heraclitus (cf. on Aristotle's Physics, B 1). [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] not other than being: instead, the inceptuality of the beginning.


11. In the first beginning

Unconcealedness is experienced ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]).

Concealment is experienced ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]).

[TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] the emerging regress, as holding constant, into presence ("being" as becoming).

The essential occurrence of [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], however, is [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII].

But unconcealedness and concealment are not interrogated in their ground.

They essentially occur as the first, as [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII].

Therefore the unconcealed itself must come to priority and with it that which presses forth in the domain of perception.

The unconcealed in perceivedness (Parmenides: [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]), the unconcealed in its visibility ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]), visibility as constancy of presence ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]).

At the same time: priority of beings themselves in the shift to [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII].

Thereby: [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] left behind in oblivion.


12. Truth and the true

The true—means that which in each case is experienced and grounded in the unrecognized essence of the true, i.e., in the essence of truth; it is always the same inasmuch as it constitutes the relation to "beings" and allows tarrying in them.

Truth, on the other hand, the essential occurrence of the true, is at times, even if seldom enough, in each case different. And this being-different arises out of the riches of beyng itself.


(Continues...)

Excerpted from The Event by Martin Heidegger, Richard Rojcewicz, Friedrich-Wilhelm v. Herrmann. Copyright © 2009 Vittorio Klostermann, Frankfurt am Main. Excerpted by permission of Indiana University Press.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Meet the Author

Richard Rojcewicz is Scholar-in-Residence in the Philosophy Department at Duquesne University. He is author of The Gods and Technology: A Reading of Heidegger and translator of several volumes of Heidegger's Complete Works, including Basic Concepts of Ancient Philosophy (IUP, 2008) and (with Daniela Vallega-Neu) Contributions to Philosophy: Of the Event (IUP, 2012).

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