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The Everlasting Man / Edition 1
     

The Everlasting Man / Edition 1

5.0 2
by G. K. Chesterton, Gilbert K. Chesterton
 

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ISBN-10: 0898704448

ISBN-13: 9780898704440

Pub. Date: 04/28/1993

Publisher: Ignatius Press

Considered by many to be Chesterton's greatest masterpiece of all his writings, this is his whole view of world history as informed by the Incarnation. Beginning with the origin of man and the various religious attitudes throughout history, Chesterton shows how the fulfillment of all of man's desires takes place in the person of Christ and in Christ's

Overview

Considered by many to be Chesterton's greatest masterpiece of all his writings, this is his whole view of world history as informed by the Incarnation. Beginning with the origin of man and the various religious attitudes throughout history, Chesterton shows how the fulfillment of all of man's desires takes place in the person of Christ and in Christ's Church.

Chesterton propounds the thesis that "those who say that Christ stands side by side with similar myths, and his religion side by side with similar religions, are only repeating a very stale formula contradicted by a very striking fact." And with all the brilliance and devastating irony, so characteristic of his best writing, Chesterton gleefully and tempestuously tears to shreds that "very stale formula" and triumphantly proclaims in vivid language the glory and unanswerable logic of that very striking fact. Here is the genius of Chesterton at its delightful best.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780898704440
Publisher:
Ignatius Press
Publication date:
04/28/1993
Edition description:
REPRINT
Pages:
276
Sales rank:
98,446
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.00(h) x (d)

Table of Contents


Preface to the Hendrickson Publishers Edition     vii
Preface to the First Edition     xiii
Introduction: The Plan of This Book     3
On the Creature Called Man
The Man in the Cave     17
Professors and Prehistoric Men     34
The Antiquity of Civilization     49
God and Comparative Religion     74
Man and Mythologies     92
The Demons and the Philosophers     107
The War of the Gods and Demons     128
The End of the World     142
On the Man Called Christ
The God in the Cave     159
The Riddles of the Gospel     175
The Strangest Story in the World     188
The Witness of the Heretics     203
The Escape from Paganism     221
The Five Deaths of the Faith     238
Conclusion: The Summary of This Book     249
On Prehistoric Man     259
On Authority and Accuracy     261

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The Everlasting Man 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
MLucero More than 1 year ago
The Everlasting Man has got to be on the list of the top five books I have ever read, on any subject, fiction or nonfiction. This, Chesterton's greatest work, is more than a mere apology; more than a mere outline of human history, though it is that. It covers the interior, one might say psychological, history of the human condition and the human experience, breaking our spiritual history into four columns - monotheism, mythology, philosophy, and diabolism - and shows how Christianity satisfies the mythic hunger for romance while at the same time satisfying the rational and philosophical hunger for truth. Chesterton is one of the sanest, most insightful, and wittiest authors I've ever read. His strength lies in seeing through popular illusions and fallacies and dispelling them, while salvaging everything in them that is good and truly human. Though he insists that Pagan religions are not really religions in the sense we mean today ("We know the meaning of all the myths. We know the last secret revealed to the perfect initiate. And it is not the voice of a priest or a prophet saying 'These things are.' It is the voice of a dreamer and an idealist crying, 'Why cannot these things be?'"), he nevertheless honors these old religions by holding up the healthy and human aspects which characterized them ("When we say that they also have temples and idols and priests and periodical festivals.we only mean that Pagans have more sense than Puritans"). Dismissing the comparative approach to mythology and folklore, Chesterton reasserts the romantic view and its essential nature as part of human identity and experience. This echoes such utterly sane and utterly delightful statements he has made in other books ("This elementary wonder, however, is not a mere fancy derived from the fairy tales; on the contrary, all the fire of the fairy tales is derived from this." - Orthodoxy). The fascinating thing about Chesterton is that he satisfies all aspects of the reader's mind (largely because his subject does so as well), the rational and the emotional. He is a Liberal in the older, classical sense, and looks down upon conservatives and progressives alike. His wit is gymnastic and his insight and intellect piercing like a narrow sword. There is not much more I can say, save that if there is only one book on Christianity or religion or mythology that you ever read, this should be it.
Guest More than 1 year ago
It's a strange thing how society takes so many preconceived notions and makes them out to be facts; and how easily we accept those supposed facts without any reflection. Everlasting Man is an absolutely incredible read that may just challenge the way you think about everything. With his characteristic wit and common sense, Chesterton makes a strikingly beautiful case for Christianity. He transforms the usual into the unusual, and along the way startles the reader into seeing what he knew previously in a new way. 'There are two ways of getting home; and one of them is to stay there; The other is to walk round the whole world till we come back to the same place; and I tried to trace such a journey.' Chesterton knew that it was only through seeing the ordinary in a new way that we experience how truly extraordinary the ordinary is. This was the book that influenced C.S. Lewis; it's not difficult to see why.