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The Face in the Frost

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Overview

The Face in the Frost is a fantasy classic, defying categorization with its richly imaginative story of two separate kingdoms of wizards, stymied by a power that is beyond their control. A tall, skinny misfit of a wizard named Prospero lives in the Southern Kingdom—a patchwork of feuding duchies and small manors, all loosely loyal to one figurehead king. Both Prospero and an improbable adventurer named Roger Bacon look in mirrors to see different times and places, which greatly affects their personalities and ...

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The Face in the Frost

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Overview

The Face in the Frost is a fantasy classic, defying categorization with its richly imaginative story of two separate kingdoms of wizards, stymied by a power that is beyond their control. A tall, skinny misfit of a wizard named Prospero lives in the Southern Kingdom—a patchwork of feuding duchies and small manors, all loosely loyal to one figurehead king. Both Prospero and an improbable adventurer named Roger Bacon look in mirrors to see different times and places, which greatly affects their personalities and mannerisms and leads them into a myriad of situations that are sometimes frightening and often hilarious.

 Hailed by critics as an extraordinary work, combining the thrills of a horror novel with the inventiveness of fantasy, The Face in the Frost is the debut novel that launched John Bellairs’s reputation as one of the most individual voices in young adult fiction.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781497642416
  • Publisher: Open Road Integrated Media LLC
  • Publication date: 9/30/2014
  • Pages: 136
  • Sales rank: 595,325
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.50 (h) x 0.37 (d)

Meet the Author

John Bellairs is beloved as a master of Gothic young adult novels and fantasies. His series about the adventures of Lewis Barnavelt and his uncle Jonathan, which includes The House with a Clock in Its Walls, is a classic. He also wrote a series of novels featuring the character Johnny Dixon. Among the titles in that series are The Curse of the Blue FigurineThe Mummy, The Will,   and The CryptThe Spell of the Sorcerer’s Skull; and others. His solo novel The Face in the Frost is also regarded as a fantasy classic, and among his earlier works are St. Fidgeta and Other Parodies and The Pedant and the Shuffly.
 
Bellairs was a prolific writer, publishing more than one dozen novels before his untimely death in 1991.

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Read an Excerpt

PROLOGUE

Prospero and Roger Bacon, the two main characters in a story that seems crammed with wizards, were wizards. They knew seven different runic alphabets, could sing the Dies Irae all the way through to the end, and knew what a Hand of Glory was. Though they could not make the moon eclipse, they could do some very striking lightning effects and make it look as though it might rain if you waited long enough.

The two large domains mentioned in this tale were always known simply as the North Kingdom and the South Kingdom. No attempt was ever made to unite them, and the Brown River always remained the boundary. Even the maintenance and garrisoning of the two great circular forts at the mouth of the river had to be split rigidly between the kingdoms-Northerners guarded the northern fort, Southerners the southern one-though the forts had only one purpose-to keep out invaders from across the sea.

The North Kingdom was split, very early in its history, into seven lesser kingdoms, whose kings met once a year on the Feasting Hill, which was in the center of a small, roughly circular plot of ground that touched all their borders, though it did not belong to any one ruler. At this harvest festival, the High King was elected: he was usually one of the seven kings, but this was not necessary; his term was one year, and could be extended in case of war. He was given a standing army of ten thousand horsemen, but he would have been powerless without the consent of the heptarchs, as the seven lesser kings were known, since any two of them could field an army greater than his. Besides, the High King was forced to leave his own domain in the hands of atemporary ruler (usually his chief steward, who became for the time a heptarch) and reign at the beautiful, but defenseless, palace on the Feasting Hill. His army was solely for use in defending the borders and-rarely-for waging war against a rebellious Northern king. In the latter case, a council of war would be called and the kings would decide whether the situation was grave enough to require action against one of their own number. Civil war was rare, but when it did come the devastation was so great that it took generations for the North to recover.

The history of the South Kingdom was stranger and much more chaotic. If you looked at a map of the South made in Prospero's time, you would think it was a badly done and rather fussy abstract painting, or the palette of a demented artist. You would see blotches within splotches within wavy circles; you would see shapes like lady fingers, like stars, like dumbbells, and like creeping dry rot. All this was the fault of Godwin I (Longbeard), the first King of All the South, and the last to hold any real power.

He divided up the kingdom among his sons, and they did likewise, and so on. Primogeniture was never established, so eventually the South became an indescribable conglomeration of duchies, earldoms, free cities, minor kingdoms, independent bishoprics, and counties. These little worlds were often the size of small farms, though they might be named the Grand Union of the Five Counties, or the Duchy of Irontree-Dragonrock. Each of these petty potentates coined his own money and levied troops; all were vaguely obligated to the King of All the South, a powerless ruler who got the title by beating all opponents at the annual tournament held in Roundcourt, the chief city of the South. Seldom could a chieftain gather enough support for anything the size of a civil war, but there was constant feuding, bickering, and bullying.

Prospero lived in the South Kingdom and never, as far as I know, held public office. He stayed at home a great deal, and his trips to other places in the North and South were made on odd occasions and (sometimes) by still odder modes of travel. The route might be wildly irregular, because he wanted to see friends or visit curious things, like plague fountains, or rocks that made funny noises in the wind. This accounts for the fact that he knew more about some places far up north than he knew about places ten miles from his home. Roger Bacon, who spent most of his time in England, was more familiar with the border country between the North and the South than Prospero was. Both of them had used mirrors to visit or look at other times and places; this naturally affected their speech, their mannerisms, and (God knows) the character of Prospero's house.

Copyright © 1969 by John Bellairs

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 15 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 15 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 27, 2000

    A Fantasy Classic (Never Mind the Age Level)

    Though I haven't been able to find a copy for years, 'The Face in the Frost' stays in my mind as one of the best fantasy novels I've ever read--up there with much of Vance and Zelazny. It's also, perhaps surprisingly, downright spooky in places. And funny as well. (The first sentence, more or less, is: 'Once upon a time there was a wizard named Prospero, and not the one you are thinking of, either.') If the mark of a great 'young adult' book is that it doesn't talk down & can be enjoyed by 50-year-olds as well as 15-year-olds, then this certainly qualifies.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 7, 2011

    fun read not too deep but enjoyable

    I had read this book in Jr High and enjoyed it. It was my favorite magic based fantasy book for a while.

    I lost my paper copy and having recently purchased a Nook I looked it up and found a ebook copy.

    I enjoyed the book as much as I did before and am glad that I purchased a copy for my nook.

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  • Posted July 21, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Fantastic read for any age.

    This is an all time fantasy great. The kind of book fantasy giants quote as an influence on thier own writing. Written gor young readrrs it is, great adult rrading too. By all means buy it and add it yo your cherished titles list.

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