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The Facts on File Dictionary of Chemistry
     

The Facts on File Dictionary of Chemistry

by John Daintith
 

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Aimed specifically at the needs of high school students and keyed to school syllabuses, The Facts On File Dictionary of Chemistry defines every chemical term and concept most people will ever need to know, in language that's easy to understand. All the basics of chemistry are covered: the elements, groups of compounds, formulas, equations, and chemical

Overview

Aimed specifically at the needs of high school students and keyed to school syllabuses, The Facts On File Dictionary of Chemistry defines every chemical term and concept most people will ever need to know, in language that's easy to understand. All the basics of chemistry are covered: the elements, groups of compounds, formulas, equations, and chemical processes. Also featured are: techniques (e.g., Regnault's method, Bessemer process), instruments (e.g., the pyrometer, Beckmann thermometer), units of measure (e.g., angstrom, lux), and specialized uses of everyday terms (e.g., mordent, quenching).

Clear, concise, and informative
This revised edition reflects modern chemical nomenclature and the most uptodate information on the properties of elements. More than 3,000 entries explain, clearly and concisely, the most important and commonly used chemical terms. More than 50 line drawings illustrate chemical structures, and extensive cross references ensure the Dictionary's accessibility and ease of use.

Over 250 new entries have been added, including:
• Buckminsterfullerene
• Fullerite
• Nanotubes
• Quasicrystal
• Supramolecular chemistry
• Crown ether
• and much more.

Editorial Reviews

American Scientist
Praise for the hardcover edition: " . . .the definitions are clear, concise, and well-written. . . recommended as a quick and easy source of chemical information..."
VOYA
This title, as well as other series volumes on biology, mathematics and physics, are made up largely of dry text enhanced slightly by diagrams and charts. Chemistry covers chemical formulas and structural formulas for many common compounds. Orbital merits an extensive description with several diagrams. Buckminsterfullerene is crossreferenced by the more common terms fullerite or bucky balls. A simplified periodic table uses a nontraditional grouping system that is probably not familiar to most American students and gives only the atomic number and symbol for each element. An additional table gives p.n. and r.a.m. for each element with no explanation; p.n. is defined in the general dictionary listing, but r.a.m. is not. The reader needs prior knowledge to know that p.n. (proton number) is the same as atomic number and r.a.m. is relative atomic mass. The entries in both dictionaries are adequate but rather dry and colorless with no frills. They provide definitions that might be difficult to find in other sources. These definitions are certainly an improvement over those generally found in dictionaries but are otherwise rather unimpressive. Illus. Charts. Appendix. 1999, Facts on File, Ages 12 to 18, 266p, $17.95 Trade pb. Reviewer: Marilyn Brien
Library Journal
These four titles all expand upon the second editions, released in 1988-89; each adds between 200 and 300 terms to keep the contents current, bringing the total number of entries up to approximately 3000 per volume. As in the previous editions, the definitions are concise and readable, targeted to the high school or undergraduate science student. Definitions range in length from a few lines in most cases to several paragraphs for more important or abstract terms. As with most technical dictionaries, etymological or pronunciation information is not provided, though line drawings enhance several of the definitions (approximately 50 per dictionary, double that in Mathematics). The use of British spellings, a drawback to the previous editions, has been eliminated here. Daintith, editor of three of the volumes, is a former research chemist in Great Britain. He is joined by Hine (life science editor of the Larousse Encyclopedia), science writer and editor Clark, and approximately a dozen contributors per dictionary. Each dictionary is supplemented by appropriate appendixes: taxonomic tables and amino acids (Biology); a periodic table, elemental information, fundamental particles, and constants (Chemistry); much the same for Physics; and conversion factors and useful symbols, formulae, and powers and roots (Mathematics). These are fine first references for the most common terms and concepts in their fields, filling a niche at the low-cost end of the market just above most concise subject dictionaries. Recommended for high school and undergraduate libraries.--Wade Lee, Univ. of Toledo Libs., OH Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.
Booknews
A reference for students of chemistry that defines terms and sometimes explains them at some length but does not indicate how to pronounce them. The first edition was published in 1980, and the third contains over 2,300 entries and appends a number of tables, including the periodic table, the Greek alphabet, and fundamental constants. There is very little cross-referencing. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780816056507
Publisher:
Facts on File, Incorporated
Publication date:
05/28/2005
Series:
Science Dictionaries Series
Edition description:
4TH
Pages:
320
Product dimensions:
5.90(w) x 8.90(h) x 0.30(d)
Age Range:
14 - 18 Years

Read an Excerpt

Newly revised and expanded, The Dictionary of Chemistry is clear, concise, and informative. All the basics of chemistry are here—the elements, groups of compounds, formulas, equations, chemical processes, laboratory techniques, and instruments. It contains more than 2,500 entries and includes modern chemical nomenclature and the most up-to-the-minute information on the properties of elements. Over 250 new entries have been added, including: buckminsterfullerene, fullerite, nanotubes, quasicrystal, supramolecular chemistry, crown ether, and much more.

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