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The Faerie Queene
     

The Faerie Queene

3.9 11
by Edmund Spenser
 

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The Faerie Queene is an incomplete English epic poem by Edmund Spenser. The first half was published in 1590, and a second installment was published in 1596. The Faerie Queene is notable for its form: it was the first work written in Spenserian stanza and is one of the longest poems in the English language.

Overview

The Faerie Queene is an incomplete English epic poem by Edmund Spenser. The first half was published in 1590, and a second installment was published in 1596. The Faerie Queene is notable for its form: it was the first work written in Spenserian stanza and is one of the longest poems in the English language.

Product Details

BN ID:
2940148326144
Publisher:
Unforgotten Classics
Publication date:
02/12/2014
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
1 MB

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The Faerie Queene 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 11 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I have this particular copy. The poetry is beautifully written. Great piece of literature that serves as the source for many of today's modern fantasy movies from the past 30 years, like Dragonslayer, Willow, The Princess Bride, The Legend of King Arthur, The Lord of the Rings trilogy and Harry Potter. The Fairy Queene describes knights, dwarves, elves, princesses, kings, queens, dragons, witches, trolls, warlocks, demons, goblins, and wizards. Classic fantasy! A must read!
Guest More than 1 year ago
i loved every ounce of this book, it is very artistic and the images placed into your mind is not easily removed; perfect! i suggest this to all classic poetry lovers :)
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Nothing great
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
BenMI More than 1 year ago
Spenser is brilliant, simply put. He has been lost in recent years, partly I think in part to the fantastical elements of this poem; however, the verse itself is outstanding. I give this book 4 stars, though, because the edition (Penguin Classics) is inadequate, particularly regarding the annotations. While I understand that a standard trade paperback is for the everyday reader and not the scholar, there is a degree of truth in Jonson's declaration on Spenser: 'he writ no language.' Archaic language and style abound in this poem. Even as a reader of Milton, I struggle with Spenser's style. Such a poem as this requires a greater degree of annotation for even the common reader, or key elements (whole passages) get lost on them. What little annotations are given are at the back of the book, so it's kind of a pain holding two places at once (primary text positions and the position of the annotations). While I suppose it is not entirely necessary on a first reading to understand every passage within FQ, I would suggest that if you are interested in Spenser for study, particularly at the graduate level, avoid this edition and fork over the fifty bucks or so for a scholarly edition with foot-note annotations.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
Awesome poetry!!