The Family of Adoption

The Family of Adoption

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by Joyce Maguire Pavao
     
 

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Full of wonderful stories that give insight into a wide variety of adoption issues, now revised in light of recent developments, The Family of Adoption is a powerful argument for the right kind of openness in adoption. Joyce Maguire Pavao uses her thirty years of experience as a family and adoption therapist to explain to adoptive parents, birthparents, adult

Overview

Full of wonderful stories that give insight into a wide variety of adoption issues, now revised in light of recent developments, The Family of Adoption is a powerful argument for the right kind of openness in adoption. Joyce Maguire Pavao uses her thirty years of experience as a family and adoption therapist to explain to adoptive parents, birthparents, adult adopted people, and extended family, as well as to those who work with children professionally the developmental stages and challenges one can expect in the life of the adopted person.

The Family of Adoption is truly the most insightful and healing book on the adoption shelf.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
A commitment to placing the best interests of the child first informs every page of this excellent study of the complex psychological and social dynamics of adoptive families. Pavao, an adoption therapist and the executive director of the Center for Family Connections in Cambridge, Mass., was herself adopted as an infant. She believes strongly in the necessity of pre- and post-adoptive counseling for both birth and adoptive parents, although she acknowledges that there is a serious lack of trained professionals for this purpose. According to the author, such counseling is essential if adoptive parents are to understand and be able to work with their child through the developmental stages common to adoptees, such as feelings of loss, school problems and a desire to learn about their past. Pavao's analysis is comprehensive, and she considers all types of adoption, including transracial, special needs, international and foster care. Drawing on adoption stories culled from her practice, she shows how the adopted child, birth parents, adoptive parents, as well as other family members benefit from such contact and openness. She is convinced that those who are adopted have a right to learn as much as possible about their past and suggests, for example, that international adoptees be allowed to visit their country of origin to better understand their roots. Adoption, Pavao writes, "is not about finding children for families, but about finding families for children." (Aug.)
Booknews
A family and adoption therapist explains the often predictable and understandable development stages and challenges she has found to be common for all adopted people. She sets them out by age level, with illustrative examples, exploring such aspects as daydreaming being a normal strategy, how particular academic subjects can be painful, and why so many adoptees experiment with The Wrong Crowd. She also discusses her own experience as an adult adoptee. No index or bibliography. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.
From the Publisher
We've long needed a book like Pavao's, which looks at adoption as an idea and a process . . . I recommend it to all readers who are affected by adoption, and isn't that all of us? —Mary Pipher, author of Reviving Ophelia and The Shelter of Each Other

"A commitment to placing the best interests of the child first informs every page of this excellent study of the complex psychological and social dynamics of adoptive families." —Publishers Weekly

"[An] insightful, informative, and at times very moving look at adoption from all sides . . . What makes this book so helpful for anyone involved in the adoption process is the author's obvious respect for all parties, including parents, extended families, and even teachers, judges, and social workers. Instead of putting people off, [Pavao] encourages them to find new ways to empathize and cooperate, keeping the child's best interest at the forefront." —Diane Daniel, Boston Globe

"This very candid, honest book takes a look at infertility and the ambiguity of adoption that is often merely alluded to in other adoption publications . . . This book is a gift to anyone involved in adoption. Get it and read it more than once." —Chosen Family Magazine

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780807028018
Publisher:
Beacon
Publication date:
07/28/1999
Pages:
138
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.01(h) x 0.48(d)

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Joyce Maguire Pavao, founder of the Adoption Resource Canter in Cambridge, Massachusetts, is also the CEO of Center for Family Connections in Cambridge and New York. She is a lecturer in psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and has lectured at Smith, Wellesley, UCLA, USC, and Antioch, among other universities.

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The Family of Adoption 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Pavao, an adoptee herself, was only told once of her adoption and after that 'no one would talk, no one would explain.' She grew up with the poisonous idea that 'people who have secrets about them think there¿s something wrong with them.'When she met her birthmother, the secrecy continued. No wonder, today, as a 'family system thinker Pavao works to change a system that perpetuates secrecy. The Family of Adoption is meant for everyone in the world of adoption, but with focus on the best interest of the child. Pavao points out that birth and adoptive families are not the only ones responsible for the family of adoption. She deplores the fact that to this day material on adoption in medical school texts are lacking. The nation¿s psychiatrists, pediatricians, obstetricians, gynecologists and general practitioners are taught next to nothing about adoption. Law schools, too, neglect to give lawyers and judges a broader framework within which to view adoption and serve each client and case. Social workers too get inadequate training to work with complex families, as do professors in psychology programs. Pavao points out the 'sadchange of events'today which shows that adoptions in the U.S. are not based on a deliberation about the child¿s welfare but on business considerations.'Her informative book tries to stir both public and private adoptions in the direction of seeing what placement would be the best for the child, and not best for the family, agency or adoption professional. Gisela Gasper Fitzgerald, author of ADOPTION: An Open, Semi-Open or Closed Practice?
Guest More than 1 year ago
The Family of Adoption provides practical advice on how to handle to difficult issues that surface in any adoption, and offers sensitive insight into the the emotional background of all the parties involved in an adoption--birth parents, adoptive parents, adopted children, and even extended family. This book is valuable not only to the adoptive parents and adopted children, but to grandparents, aunts, uncles, and other family members who will impact the adoptive family, but may have no idea of the complex emotional fabric of that family.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Really made me feel good at last to be a birthmother. Helped me to get through my feelings of a closed adoption. Speaks from the heart.