The Fantasy Principle: Psychoanalysis of the Imagination

Overview

Contemporary psychoanalysis needs less reality and more fantasy; what Michael Vannoy Adams calls the "fantasy principle." The Fantasy Principle radically affirms the centrality of imagination. It challenges us to exercise and explore the imagination, shows us how to value vitally important images that emerge from the unconscious, how to evoke such images, and how to engage them decisively. It shows us how to apply Jungian techniques to interpret images accurately and to experience images immediately and ...

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Overview

Contemporary psychoanalysis needs less reality and more fantasy; what Michael Vannoy Adams calls the "fantasy principle." The Fantasy Principle radically affirms the centrality of imagination. It challenges us to exercise and explore the imagination, shows us how to value vitally important images that emerge from the unconscious, how to evoke such images, and how to engage them decisively. It shows us how to apply Jungian techniques to interpret images accurately and to experience images immediately and intimately through what Jung calls "active imagination." The Fantasy Principle makes a strong case for a new school of psychoanalysis-the school of "imaginal psychology"-which emphasizes the transformative impact of images. All those who desire to give individuals an opportunity to become more imaginative will find this book fascinating reading.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781583918197
  • Publisher: Taylor & Francis
  • Publication date: 5/10/2004
  • Pages: 272
  • Product dimensions: 6.10 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Table of Contents

Preface. The Fantasy Principle: Imaginal Psychology and the Dethroning of 'Mr. Reality'. Compensation in the Service of Individuation; Phenomenological Essentialism and Jungian Dream Interpretation. Jungian Post-Structural Theory: Structures versus Constructs. Concepts versus Images. Mythological Knowledge: Just How Important is It in Jungian (and Freudian) Analysis?. The 'Womanning' of Schreber: Catastrophe, Creation, and the Mythopoeic Forces of Mankind. Dreaming of the Ku Klux Klan: 'Race', History, and Culture in Psychoanalysis. Jung, Africa, and the 'Geopathology' of Europe: Psychic Place and Displacement, Refathering Psychoanalysis. Deliteralizing Hillman: Imaginal Therapy, Individual and Cultural. A Baby Is Being Eaten: A Case of Cannibalistic Malpractice and Suicide. The Importance of Being Blasphemous: Profanation versus Resacralization. References.

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 19, 2008

    Fantasy Principle: Psychoanalysis of the Imagination

    From my experience of jungian-analysis with this particular analyst, the jungian psychanalytic community appears to be big-time-for-profit cult. The so-called authority this author uses in his book during his analysis with his patients regarding his judgement and qualifications capturing their imagination, fantasies and trappings of their very soul as designed to inculcate, manipulate and gain control over clients and their wallets. To use the therapuetic relationship as a gateway to ply patients as customers for a expensive jungian training 'program' or 'circuit' is a form of abuse - exploiting the natural therapuetic transference for personal financial gain. If you're in jungian analysis and your symptoms are worsening and you're feeling terrible and sick, and your analyst keeps insisting you continue with your expensive analysis - that your so-called 'cure' for your so-called 'illness' is to gain a higher consciousness and that gateway to a higher consciousness, towards 'individuation' is to surrender completely to your analyst, to become weaker and weaker and more dependent in the transference, and if you find yourself shelling out thousands of dollars against your better judgement...i suggest you consider you've fallen into venus fly trap of the jung cult (check out the 'Jung Cult' by Richard Noll - he is a former jungian analyst and blows the lid of this cult in his text)

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 13, 2008

    Fantasy Principle: Psychoanalysis of the Imagination

    My experience with this book has been negative. I entered analysis with this analyst and he quoted from his books like he believed he was an authority on the subject of my imagination, the roots of my fantasies and my very soul. Are the Jungian's a Cult? There is another book I found at Barnes and Noble called 'The Jung Cult' and it's helped me make sense of this experience.

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