The Farther You Run

( 16 )

Overview

This past May, Samantha lost her best friend, Juliana, to cancer. Now there is no one to share secrets, gossip, and dreams; no reason to go to dance class by herself. The way she sees it, there's only one thing to do: close that door, and try to move on. Then, in summer school, Samantha meets Mona, who has her own set of challenges. The two girls click right away. By summer's end they've found jobs, boyfriends, and an apartment in San Francisco. But doors don't always stay closed. Just before the anniversary of ...
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Overview

This past May, Samantha lost her best friend, Juliana, to cancer. Now there is no one to share secrets, gossip, and dreams; no reason to go to dance class by herself. The way she sees it, there's only one thing to do: close that door, and try to move on. Then, in summer school, Samantha meets Mona, who has her own set of challenges. The two girls click right away. By summer's end they've found jobs, boyfriends, and an apartment in San Francisco. But doors don't always stay closed. Just before the anniversary of Jules's death, things begin to fall apart. Can Samantha and Mona come to terms with their separate pasts and make their friendship strong again?

Even with a new best friend and a new boyfriend, Samantha has a hard time adjusting to life without her best friend Juliana, who died of cancer.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Samantha Russell, who lost her best friend, Juliana, to cancer in A Time for Dancing, still suffers from that loss in the sequel, The Farther You Run by Davida Wills Hurwin. Samantha is trying her hardest to forget Jules, and she finds an able ally when she meets feisty Mona in summer school, and the two quickly bond. In chapters alternating between Mona's and Samantha's points of view, Hurwin describes Samantha's emotional journey to face her painful memories. Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
This book is the sequel to A Time for Dancing. Samantha is learning to survive after her best friend died of cancer. The story begins the summer after Jules death and Samantha finds herself in summer school where she meets Mona. Like Samantha, Mona has had some rough issues to deal with. Her mom is bipolar and Mona is the only one around to keep things together sometimes. The two girls quickly bond and suddenly decide to move to San Francisco together. The story is told from alternating perspectives of Mona and Samantha. They deal with boyfriends, sex, individuality and their goals. The girls still have issues in their lives and they can't hide from them forever; and suddenly their friendship isn't all they though it was. While this book is a sequel, it can stand well on its own. The story deals with some fairly mature issues, but not always in such as realistic way. For example, Mona, at they age of 17, is able to get a respectable job at an advertising agency with little effort. The difficulty of living on your own as a teenager is not really discussed. The alternating perspective is an effective window into the character's thoughts. However, due to the constant and quick shifts, readers may often be confused as to which girl they are reading about. 2003, Viking/Penguin Group,
— Caroline Haugen
VOYA
Hurwin lets down her readers by writing a story that is utterly incomparable to its prequel. The characters are no longer believable or interesting, and Sammie's new friend Mona is especially aggravating. How she and Sammie become such good friends so quickly is a mystery, and readers won't truly care about Mona's potentially interesting relationship with her mother. Hurwin waits until the very end of the book to explore Sammie's feelings, and only in these last few chapters does the author show signs of the kind of writing that brought her popularity through her first book. Readers might enjoy this light, fluffy read but will then look back at it as being nowhere near to what Hurwin did in A Time for Dancing. VOYA CODES: 4Q 4P S (Better than most, marred only by occasional lapses; Broad general YA appeal; Senior High, defined as grades 10 to 12). 2003, Viking, 256p,
— Anna Hutchinson, Teen Reviewer
School Library Journal
Gr 9 Up-In this unremarkable sequel to A Time for Dancing (Little, Brown, 1995), Samantha must cope with the death of her best friend as she also takes her first steps into the adult world. The first book ended with Jules's death from cancer; this one takes up Samantha's story during the following year. She is in denial, unable to deal with the loss of her longtime friend. Going to summer school in order to graduate, she befriends Mona, a troubled girl who happens to look like Jules. She and Samantha manage to find an apartment to share in San Francisco, where they both get jobs. Mona deals with her mother's mental problems and her own self-destructive behavior while Samantha buries her feelings and pushes friends and family away. When Samantha argues with her boyfriend, Mona ends up sleeping with him, nearly ending the friendship. Eventually, Samantha takes steps to come to terms with her loss. The friendship between the two girls is convincing, and teens will enjoy reading about their attempts to build a life away from their parents. Casual marijuana use and several sex scenes-none particularly graphic-give readers a realistic view of teen life. However, the plot is too thin to grab the attention of anyone who has not read and loved the first book.-Miranda Doyle, San Francisco Public Library Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Samantha, the surviving friend in perennially popular A Time for Dancing (1995) continues her life immediately following Julie's death by leaving dancing completely alone. Julie's death from cancer was told in the first novel in alternating chapters, a structure Hurwin retains, by having the voice of new friend Mona alternate with that of Sam's. Slowly and painfully the path Sam must take to deal with her grief unfolds. Mona is a substitute for Julie, and her wry humor and unusual home life-her mother is bipolar with memorable manic episodes-provides needed balance. After the girls meet in a makeup English class, they decide to live together in an apartment in San Francisco rather than go to college. Immensely appealing and slightly unrealistic in the depiction of life on one's own, this will be most satisfying to those who have read the first of the pair. The lack of passion for dancing is decidedly noticeable. Upscale Lurlene McDaniel fare. (Fiction. YA)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780606331265
  • Publisher: San Val, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 2/1/2005
  • Pages: 217
  • Age range: 14 - 17 Years
  • Product dimensions: 4.42 (w) x 7.04 (h) x 0.77 (d)

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 16 )
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