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The Fate of the Artist: His Domestic Apocalypse: An Autobiographical Novel, with Typographical Anomalies, in Which the Author Does Not Appear as Hiimself
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The Fate of the Artist: His Domestic Apocalypse: An Autobiographical Novel, with Typographical Anomalies, in Which the Author Does Not Appear as Hiimself

by Eddie Campbell
 

In this pseudo-autobiography, the subject of the memoir has vanished without a trace. Through six separate threads, each on typographically and stylistically distinct, a private investigator tried to discover the artist's fate through false trails, family and daily life reenactments, and even an imaginary Sunday comic strip. As the narrative threads intersect and

Overview

In this pseudo-autobiography, the subject of the memoir has vanished without a trace. Through six separate threads, each on typographically and stylistically distinct, a private investigator tried to discover the artist's fate through false trails, family and daily life reenactments, and even an imaginary Sunday comic strip. As the narrative threads intersect and colllide in surprising ways, the reader is carried along on a fantastic journey through the life of the artist.

A master comics artist, here Eddie Campbell offers a complex, caustic, and surprising meditation on balancing the lonely life of the artist with the demands of everyday life.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Campbell, best known for his work on From Hell and his autobiographical Alec comics, has come up with a marvelous sui generis oddity: a meta-memoir about his own disappearance that's a kind of intently controlled nervous breakdown on paper. It's a nonlinear, mixed-media collage of a book-there are typeset prose passages, painted comics about his family, old-fashioned newspaper strips, photos with typeset word balloons, a child's crayon scrawl representing God and, near the end, an illustrated adaptation of O. Henry's story "The Confessions of a Humorist," which concerns how habitually turning life into art can make life unbearable. Campbell's always been interested in the curious nooks of history, and there's a running thread about artistic also-rans like Johann Schobert and the Greek sculptor Phidias; there's also an ongoing gag about Campbell replacing himself with an imaginary actor named Richard Siegrist. The tone is whimsical and playful, but there's a deep despair beneath it-about drinking, burnout and what happens to an artist "when his imaginary friends [stop] calling"-that overwhelms and takes the place of the plot. What pulls the whole thing together is Campbell's stunningly protean visual technique: fierce blotches of watercolor, scraggly pen-and-ink work and whiplash stylistic shifts from impressionistic caricatures to exquisitely rendered painterly miniatures. Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781596431713
Publisher:
First Second
Publication date:
05/02/2006
Edition description:
Collector's Edition
Pages:
96
Product dimensions:
6.27(w) x 8.69(h) x 0.60(d)
Age Range:
14 - 18 Years

Meet the Author

Eddie Campbell is the acclaimed artist behind From Hell, for which he won the Ignatz award for Outstanding Graphic Novel and the Eisner award for Best Graphic Album. In 2001, From Hell was made into a major motion picture starring Johnny Depp. Campbell is also the creator of the series Bacchus and Alec: The King Canute Crowd.

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