The Fighting At Jutland

The Fighting At Jutland

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by H. W. Fawcett
     
 

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Experiences of the momentous fleet battle of the Great War at sea

The narratives of the fighting at Jutland which are collected in this book were all written by officers or men who were present at the battle, and they are, therefore, first-hand evidence of the detailed events of the fighting. The book is not a criticism; it is a record of personal experiences. One

Overview

Experiences of the momentous fleet battle of the Great War at sea

The narratives of the fighting at Jutland which are collected in this book were all written by officers or men who were present at the battle, and they are, therefore, first-hand evidence of the detailed events of the fighting. The book is not a criticism; it is a record of personal experiences. One has often felt that a great gap would be filled in the histories of old-time naval battles if one could read true stories of all the hundred and one personal incidents of the fighting that must have occurred in the days of old. Imagine the adventure that could be contained in a book truly describing the fighting incidents of Trafalgar! What an insight it would give us into the character and courage of the men who served Nelson. So this book of the Fighting at Jutland is an endeavour to fill a like gap for the one fleet action of the War of 1914-18. (From the Introduction) This book benefits from the inclusion a useful supporting narrative of the action in detail and at large to give the experiences of the individual authors context and to clarify their role in the wider conflict, as well as numerous photographs, illustrations, maps and diagrams demonstrating the manoeuvring of vessels. Available in softcover and hardcover with dustjacket.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780857064219
Publisher:
Oakpast
Publication date:
11/13/2010
Pages:
296
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.81(d)

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The Fighting at Jutland 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Jutland again - but a very different approach and an extremely useful tool for those studying the events that led to the loss of ships on both sides. At the end of WW1, there was considerable public disquiet about the outcome of the Battle of Jutland. This was largely based on ignorance - but, even today, there are those who still think Admiral Jellicoe should have been court-martialled for turning his fleet away from the enemy. What few people realise, however, is that this was the first major action between two enemy fleets since the Battle of Trafalgar in 1805. During those intervening 111 years, the modern warship had evolved into a gigantic thing of steel with revolving gun turrets. Tactics, however, had never changed and 'crossing the enemy's 'T'' was still enshrined in concrete - as the teaching of the day. In any scenario whereby two fleets - sailing in line astern, are trying to achieve this advantage, it is also perilously important to ensure the leading ships in one's own fleet are not crossed! It was, therefore, perfectly in order for the Commander to manoeuvre his fleet either towards or away from the enemy - depending on whether he was in a position to gain this supreme advantage or ensure the enemy did not. Some say Jellicoe had very good reasons for turning away - whereas others disagree. In order to give the British public a better idea of exactly what went on during the Battle, two Naval Officers - who had also been present at the Battle, collected together 60 accounts from those who had fought in British ships. Their purpose was to give the reader an insight into what had gone on throughout the British fleet and across the RN rank structure at this time. Suitably edited, they then placed these contributions together in the chronological order of the Battle. Politically sensitive, however, it was difficult to get the material published with only half the material finally seeing print at that time. This book contains all the original text and also the carefully chosen photographs, sketches and charts which were so important to that first edition. Entirely re-set to make it more readable, this is an excellent book - for those contemplating a trip to the wrecks in question - and for those who are not. NM