The Five Points

The Five Points

4.3 6
by Rocco Dormarunno
     
 
Two gritty tales from gas lamp era New York.

The Five Points finished in the top five, out of over 7,000 entries, in the 1997 HarperCollins Best Seller Contest. The Five Points neighborhood of 19th Century New York City was undoubtedly the most crime-ridden, impoverished, and dangerous place of its day. While people tend to think of this era as a glossy, golden age

Overview

Two gritty tales from gas lamp era New York.

The Five Points finished in the top five, out of over 7,000 entries, in the 1997 HarperCollins Best Seller Contest. The Five Points neighborhood of 19th Century New York City was undoubtedly the most crime-ridden, impoverished, and dangerous place of its day. While people tend to think of this era as a glossy, golden age, it was, unfortunately, a world of unparalleled corruption, intrigue, and violence. Dominated by thieves, murderers, swindlers, brothels, and gangs with such colorful names as The Dead Rabbits, The Whyos, and The Plug Uglies, the neighborhood had long been a symbol of urban misery and toughness. This work, through two stories, attempts to bring this world back to life. You will meet: Petey Daley, the shrewd and fierce leader of The Dead Rabbits; Police Superintendent Connery, an honest cop struggling with a dishonest system; and Rudy and Ted, two con artists who know just what to do. Whenever novels and Hollywood try to tackle 19th Century America, they always seem to focus on the wild, wild West. Welcome, everyone, to the wild, wild Lower East Side.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780595204465
Publisher:
iUniverse, Incorporated
Publication date:
11/12/2001
Pages:
180
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.41(d)

Related Subjects

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

The Five Points 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
Read this book while spending 20 hours in the delivery room waiting on my wife. Finished it the next morning. What a great read. Loved both stories. The characters were great. Especially Martine DelaCroix. I like books that have a real sense of history to them. I will definitely read the second book and I hope to see more books in the future.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Anyone who has studied their US History knows that New York City did not escape it's fair share of civil war-like periods. This book presents the neighborhood called the 5 Points in the mid-19th century. This was a time when the famine Irish competed with all the other immigrant groups and the local groups for control of the streets. The book does an excellent job of depicting the unbelievable measures people went through to get by. It is to bad the book's so short but maybe the author will write more.
Guest More than 1 year ago
A fun book! Both stories are unforgettable! The Five Points is a page turner, no question!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Warning: Once you pick this book up -- you can't put it down. Absolutely mesmerizing. Story, characters (especially Petey), descriptions, dialogue, historical backgrounds are all there. Reading it I felt as though I were in the Five Points also -- the exciting, wonderful hellhole of Manhattan.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This fictional account of the New York neighborhood which is the book's title, is very brutal and violent, as immigrants fight for pennies and power. I lost track of the body count, and this left me a little uneasy-all the violence. But this is what survival was like in old NY, and that's what the author is after. The story-telling is paced really well, in general. There is one scene that is incredibly powerful that takes place in a bar called The Suicide Hall. As a woman, it frightened me to know that men went to this bar hoping to witness a prostitute's death. It frightened me more when I found out the place really existed. Why isn't this side of Western 'civilization' in text books? I hope people read this book and see how cruel man can be. (PS - I was glad when the owner of this bar got what was coming to him. I'm not giving anything away.)