The Flying Machine Book: Build and Launch 35 Rockets, Gliders, Helicopters, Boomerangs, and More [NOOK Book]

Overview

Calling all future Amelia Earharts and Chuck Yeagers—there’s more than one way to get off the ground. Author and physics teacher Bobby Mercer will show readers 35 easy-to-build and fun-to-fly contraptions that can be used indoors or out. Better still, each of these rockets, gliders, boomerangs, launchers, and helicopters are constructed for little or no cost using recycled materials.             The Flying Machine Book will show readers how to turn rubber ...
See more details below
The Flying Machine Book: Build and Launch 35 Rockets, Gliders, Helicopters, Boomerangs, and More

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$9.99
BN.com price
(Save 16%)$11.99 List Price

Overview

Calling all future Amelia Earharts and Chuck Yeagers—there’s more than one way to get off the ground. Author and physics teacher Bobby Mercer will show readers 35 easy-to-build and fun-to-fly contraptions that can be used indoors or out. Better still, each of these rockets, gliders, boomerangs, launchers, and helicopters are constructed for little or no cost using recycled materials.             The Flying Machine Book will show readers how to turn rubber bands, paper clips, straws, plastic bottles, and index cards into amazing, gravity-defying flyers. Learn how to turn a drinking straw, rubber band, and index card into a Straw Rocket, or convert a paper towel tube into a Grape Bazooka. Empty water bottles can be transformed into Plastic Zippers and Bottle Rockets, and ordinary paper can be cut and folded to make a Fingerrangs—a small boomerang—or a Maple Key Helicopter.             Each project contains a material list and detailed step-by-step instructions with photos. Mercer also includes explanations of the science behind each flyer, including concepts such as lift, thrust, and drag, the Bernoulli effect, and more. Readers can use this information to modify and improve their flyers, or explain to their teachers why throwing a paper airplane is a mini science lesson.   Bobby Mercer has been sharing the fun of free flight for over two decades as a high school physics teacher. He is the author of several books and lives with his family outside of Asheville, North Carolina.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Hands-on activities that encourage imaginations to soar."  —Kirkus Reviews

"Easy-to-build and fun-to-fly contraptions."  —Learning 

"Takes paper airplanes to a whole new level."  —The Buffalo News 

"Easy to build and fun-to-fly contraptions."  —Daily Courier

"Author Bobby Mercer offers clear directions and photographs to help kids complete the projects."  —The Indiana Gazette

School Library Journal
Gr 4–6—Mercer, a physics teacher and the author of the highly educational How Do You Light a Fart? And 150 Other Essential Things Every Guy Should Know About Science (Adams Media, 2009), presents easy-to-follow instructions for making flying toys or shooters from drinking straws, foam plates, used greeting cards, and other common materials. After opening with discussions of the Bernoulli principle and the significance of lift, thrust, drag, and weight on flying devices, he goes on to show, in a mix of brief directions and step photographs, how to construct and adjust a variety of simple missiles, gliders, Frisbees, and boomerangs. Some are launched by hand, some by a stretched rubber band—but for more spectacular speeds and distances he also includes a pressure launcher made from an empty water bottle (stomped), a balloon-in-a-Pringles-can slingshot, and a cardboard platform with a pistol grip. The grape-shooting bazooka fits into the overall sensibility, if not the theme. The author properly suggests or commands adult supervision where appropriate, and repeatedly cautions young experimenters to aim away from friends, pets, and breakables. Incorporating a variety of materials, these models make good alternatives to the ones in Norman Schmidt's Incredible Paper Flying Machines (Sterling, 2001) and other collections more focused on traditional origami.—John Peters, Children's Literature Consultant, New York City
Kirkus Reviews
Step-by-step instructions for 35 aerodynamic projects offer hours of fun and an increased understanding of what makes things fly. Physics teacher Mercer, who described science principles in sports in The Leaping, Sliding, Sprinting, Riding Science Book (2006) here provides clear directions for building a variety of flying machines including rockets, gliders, helicopters, boomerangs and assorted launchers. An opening chapter called "Flight School" introduces the Bernoulli principle and four forces: lift, thrust, drag and weight. The author's teaching background is reflected in his artful use of repetition. Each subsequent chapter begins with more flight school, repeating the relevant principles and applying them to the different forms of flying machines described. Many of the constructions use similar techniques and most are not difficult. The models are made of common materials: card stock and old folders, drinking straws, rubber bands and duct tape. Black-and-white photographs by the author show hand positions and paper folds, making the steps easy to follow. He recommends customary safety precautions and periodically reminds readers that some things may take practice. Makers of a series of these models, whether they were constructed as a school project or just for fun, will come away with a heightened understanding of aerodynamic principles. Hands-on activities that encourage imaginations to soar. (Nonfiction. 8-14)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781613740897
  • Publisher: Chicago Review Press, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 5/1/2012
  • Series: Science in Motion Series
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 208
  • Sales rank: 1,237,398
  • Age range: 9 - 12 Years
  • File size: 5 MB

Meet the Author

Bobby Mercer is a high school physics teacher and the author of several books, including How Do You Light a Fart?, Quarterback Dad, and Smash It! Crash It! Launch It! He lives outside of Asheville, North Carolina.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 2.5
( 3 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(2)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Posted April 10, 2013

    I'm not entirely sure what the only other reviewer finds so horr

    I'm not entirely sure what the only other reviewer finds so horrible about this book. Personally, I found it one of the best books about paper flying devices that I've ever read, and in fact have planned several library programs using it. It differs from other books of its type by offering paper airplane designs modified by other materials such as straws, rubber bands, paper clips--common office supplies. This is in contrast to others that generally only feature paper-only, folded airplanes. (Not to say that these other books are inferior; they're just more common.) I had some difficulty creating one of the designs (mostly because I kept breaking my paper clip in one step), but the others were either easy or just difficult enough to be challenging, but still fun. Overall, it's a fantastic book, and I found little else to dislike about it.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 21, 2014

    Poop

    Pooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooop!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 21, 2012

    Horrable!!!!!

    Yes it wus horrible!!!!!!! >=3

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)