The Forging of Bureaucratic Autonomy: Reputations, Networks, and Policy Innovation in Executive Agencies, 1862-1928

The Forging of Bureaucratic Autonomy: Reputations, Networks, and Policy Innovation in Executive Agencies, 1862-1928

by Daniel Carpenter
     
 

"The Forging of Bureaucratic Autonomy is a major work sure to influence future understandings of progressivism, state-building, and American political development. Carpenter delves into the highly variable world of bureaucratic entrepreneurship and innovation in organization to explain the emergence of scattered pockets of administrative autonomy within the

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Overview

"The Forging of Bureaucratic Autonomy is a major work sure to influence future understandings of progressivism, state-building, and American political development. Carpenter delves into the highly variable world of bureaucratic entrepreneurship and innovation in organization to explain the emergence of scattered pockets of administrative autonomy within the executive branch of American government. His carefully crafted analysis of the conditions under which administrators have gained control over the political authorities that ostensibly control them presents a formidable challenge to the assumptions of political scientists, and it should prompt some equally careful rethinking of the operations of American democracy more generally."—Stephen Skowronek, Yale University

"Although we tend to discuss the strength, or weakness, of state autonomy as though it were the same for every agency, the fact of the matter is that autonomy varies considerably from agency to agency. In this excellent book, Daniel Carpenter is among the first to make this observation and explore its implications."—Graham K. Wilson, University of Wisconsin-Madison

"Whether we regard the modern state as fair as Athena, stepping fully formed from the brow of Zeus, or as foul as Frankenstein, sutured on a scientist's table, there had to be a time of quickening when the limbs began to twitch and the brain began to spark. In a splendid reinterpretation of the classic period of American state formation, Dan Carpenter demonstrates that a self-conscious mentality emerged because career bureaucratic officials created overlapping networks between their agencies and forged public reputations that secured support from the citizenry. Thus freed them from the influence of political parties, these officials then turned on the very politicians who had created them."—Richard Bensel, Cornell University

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780691070100
Publisher:
Princeton University Press
Publication date:
08/20/2001
Series:
Princeton Studies in American Politics: Historical, International, and Comparative Perspectives Series
Pages:
472
Sales rank:
1,180,379
Product dimensions:
6.10(w) x 9.10(h) x 1.30(d)

Table of Contents

List of Illustrations ix

List of Tables xi

Acknowledgments xiii

Abbreviations xv

Introduction 1

One: Entrepreneurship, Networked Legitimacy, and Autonomy 14

Two: The Clerical State: Obstacles to Bureaucratic Autonomy

in Nineteenth-Century America 37

Three: The Railway Mail, Comstockery, and the Waning of the Old Postal Regime, 1862-94 65

Four: Organizational Renewal and Policy Innovation in the National Postal System, 1890-1910 94

Five: The Triumph of the Moral Economy: Finance, Parcels, and the Labor Dilemma in the Post Office, 1908-24 144

Six: Science in the Service of Seeds: The USDA, 1862-1900 179

Seven: From Seeds to Science: The USDA as University, 1897-1917 212

Eight: Multiple Networks and the Autonomy of Bureaus: Departures in Food, Pharmaceutical, and Forestry Policy, 1897-1913 255

Nine: Brokerage and Bureaucratic Policymaking: The Cementing of Autonomy at the USDA, 1914-28 290

Ten: Structure, Reputation, and the Bureaucratic Failure of Reclamation Policy, 1902-14 326

Conclusion: The Politics of Bureaucratic Autonomy 353

Notes 369

Archival Sources 459

Index 465

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