The Frank Show

The Frank Show

5.0 1
by David Mackintosh
     
 

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This hilarious, offbeat picture book from the creator of Marshall Armstrong Is New to Our School reveals that there is more to the older generation than meets the eye. Grandpa Frank doesn’t have any interesting hobbies, unless you count complaining about how everything was better in the old days. He doesn’t speak Italian like Paolo’s

Overview

This hilarious, offbeat picture book from the creator of Marshall Armstrong Is New to Our School reveals that there is more to the older generation than meets the eye. Grandpa Frank doesn’t have any interesting hobbies, unless you count complaining about how everything was better in the old days. He doesn’t speak Italian like Paolo’s mom, or play the drums like Tom’s uncle. He’s just a grandpa. So when the young narrator of this story is forced to bring Frank to school for show-and-tell, he’s sure it’s going to be a disaster. But Frank has a trick—make that a tattoo—up his sleeve! And a story to go with it. After all, the longer you’ve been around, the more time you’ve had for wild adventures.

Praise for The Frank Show
STARRED REVIEWS
“Mackintosh’s busy, helter-skelter images contribute mightily to the story’s humor and emotional honesty, but it’s the willful personalities of both of these protagonists that make it stand out.”
Publishers Weekly, starred review

"This humorous and heartwarming tale will inspire children to seek out their own grandparents' treasure trove of stories."
Shelf-Awareness, starred review

"Pore over the funny details, soak in the humor (the things-were-a-lot-tougher-in-my-day spread had me in stitches), appreciate the very specific mood Mackintosh so successfully creates in this story, and delight in the illustration, lettering and overall design, all handled by the talented and overachieving Mackintosh."
Kirkus Reviews blog

"Mackintosh writes with irreverence, and his illustrations are packed with prickly humor... But Mackintosh also draws with emotional sensitivity and empathy."
The New York Times online

"Old-timey gripes gain zest from Mr. Mackintosh's exuberant and colorful collage illustrations."
The Wall Street Journal

"Complete with lively pen-and-ink illustrations, this offbeat picture book is sure to become a family favorite. Along the way, it may prompt children to wonder what exciting details their grandparents have yet to reveal about their own life stories."
BookPage

"The cartoon illustrations are very funny. Frank’s oversize glasses with a missing right temple enhance the mood. A sweet story that proves that elderly relatives can be cool after all."
School Library Journal

"As a lover of vintage and vintage-inspired children’s books, I was instantly enamored with The Frank Show by British illustrator and designer David Mackintosh — a charming homage to grandparents and the art of seeing beneath the grumpy exterior."
Brain Pickings

"The art is appealing as well; digitally created scenes pulls together planes of vivid color, a multitude of small elements outlined in black scrawls, and elements of collage."
The Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books

"Reminding readers that everyone has a story to tell, this picture book is fun to read while providing insight into human character."
Reading Today Online

Awards:
GOLD - Parents' Choice Award Winner, Picture Books

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
As in Marshall Armstrong Is New to Our School, British author/illustrator Mackintosh presents a story of an ordinary boy being won over, reluctantly, by someone outside the mainstream. In this case, it’s the narrator’s grandfather, Frank, a quintessentially cantankerous specimen of a man who believes things were better in the good ol’ days. “These days there are too many gadgets and gizmos,” Frank types out on a green “Prehistoric” brand typewriter. “I prefer doing things the old-fashioned way.” When the boy has to talk for “one full minute” about a family member for show-and-tell, Frank is his only option (“Mom was very busy and Dad had had a very long day”). The boy approaches show-and-tell like a prisoner headed for the gallows (Mackintosh draws him all alone in gray, while his classmates laugh and shout in color on the opposing page), but there’s more to Frank than his grandson realizes. Mackintosh’s busy, helter-skelter images contribute mightily to the story’s humor and emotional honesty, but it’s the willful personalities of both of these protagonists that make it stand out. Ages 5–7. (Aug.)
School Library Journal
Gr 1–3—The unnamed narrator explains that his class must introduce a family member for show-and-tell. It seems that everyone else has someone interesting to talk about. Tom's uncle is a cool musician who can be heard on the radio. Kristian's dad is a television comedian, and Fay's cousin works at the airport weighing baggage. Saul's aunt swam the English Channel. But the protagonist only has Frank, who is "just a grandpa." Frank is grumpy and always says that things were much tougher when he was young. He also thinks that there are too many "gadgets and gizmos" nowadays. He doesn't trust barbers, and he's not too sure about doctors, either. The boy worries that his talk is sure to be boring by comparison, and sure enough, he runs out of interesting things to share about his relative. But then Frank begins to tell the class about his military experience: "Bullets whistling all around like African bees," capturing enemy soldiers with only wit and force, and playing his bugle while leading the charge. He even has shrapnel in his arm to this day. It's the best show-and-tell of all. Rendered mostly in ink, watercolor, pencil, and some mixed-media collage, the cartoon illustrations are very funny. Frank's oversize glasses with a missing right temple enhance the mood. A sweet story that proves that elderly relatives can be cool after all.—Roxanne Burg, Orange County Public Library, CA
The New York Times
Mackintosh writes with irreverence, and his illustrations are packed with prickly humor.
—Pamela Paul

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781419703935
Publisher:
Abrams, Harry N., Inc.
Publication date:
08/01/2012
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
9.04(w) x 11.16(h) x 0.46(d)
Lexile:
AD780L (what's this?)
Age Range:
5 - 7 Years

Meet the Author

David Mackintosh is the author of Marshall Armstrong Is New to Our School. He is a graphic designer, art director, and illustrator. His innovative book designs have won numerous awards internationally. Born in Belfast and raised in Australia, he now lives in London. Visit him online at www.DavidMackintosh.co.uk.

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The Frank Show 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
CanadaInker4 More than 1 year ago
Ever have to bring a family member in for a Friday show and tell?  Ever have your family abdicate and all you have left to take is grumpy, old grandpa who seems to complain about everything there is to complain about?  He doesn't like modern gizmos and gadgets, he has no hobbies, doesn't speak another language or play a musical instrument, he uses an old typewriter to type on and hasn't bought a new pair of pants in ten years!  He hates haircuts, doctors and any sort of ice cream that isn't vanilla. What can you say about such a boring, uncool guy in the one minute allotted to you? Downcast and mortified the narrator (an unnamed boy) has no alternative but to bring his grandpa to school, present him to his class and try to get through this horrific experience.  The boy approaches his assigned presentation like he is headed for the gallows.  Mackintosh draws him alone and in grey, while his classmates laugh and shout in colour on the opposite page.  The illustrations are a combination of ink, pencil drawings, paper collages and photos.  He uses a great color pallet, just perfect for the storyline. What the boy discovers is truly remarkable.  His grandpa starts spinning stories that mesmerize the whole class.  Grandpa can eat pickled onions right out of the pickle jar, he can catch a fly with his bare hands and let it go again, he has a rubber band ball that is twenty-eight years old and he even has a cool tattoo!!!  The class in enamoured with Frank's grandpa.  He is a big hit and they treat him like a rock star. We are reminded that every one has a story and (a life) before they become a grandpa.  It is so worthwhile to bridge that generation gap and take time to sit down and listen to the elders around you. These older people are filled with wisdom and knowledge that I am sure they would love to share with you.   Make an effort to find out what stories are buried deep inside your grandad (or grandma) and you will be much richer for knowing them.