The Free Press Crisis of 1800: Thomas Cooper's Trial for Seditious Libel

Overview

The far-reaching Sedition Act of 1798 was introduced by Federalists to suppress Republican support of French revolutionaries and imposed fines and imprisonment "if any person shall write, print, utter or publish...scandalous and malicious writing or writings against the government of the United States." Such a broadly and loosely defined offense challenged the freedom of the American press and gave the government the power to drag offending newspaper editors into court. The trial of Thomas Cooper in particular ...

See more details below
Paperback (New Edition)
$15.44
BN.com price
(Save 8%)$16.95 List Price
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (6) from $7.85   
  • New (1) from $17.05   
  • Used (5) from $7.85   
Sending request ...

Overview

The far-reaching Sedition Act of 1798 was introduced by Federalists to suppress Republican support of French revolutionaries and imposed fines and imprisonment "if any person shall write, print, utter or publish...scandalous and malicious writing or writings against the government of the United States." Such a broadly and loosely defined offense challenged the freedom of the American press and gave the government the power to drag offending newspaper editors into court. The trial of Thomas Cooper in particular became an important showcase for debating the dangers and limits of the new law. Peter Charles Hoffer, one of our nation's preeminent legal historians, illuminates this important but long-neglected case and shows why it remains a vital cautionary tale for anyone concerned about preserving free speech and a free press in times of national emergency.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780700617654
  • Publisher: University Press of Kansas
  • Publication date: 1/24/2011
  • Series: Landmark Law Cases and American Society Series
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Pages: 166
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.50 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Meet the Author

Peter Charles Hoffer is Distinguished Research Professor of History at the University of Georgia and coeditor of the prizewinning series Landmark Law Cases and American Society. His nearly dozen books include A Nation of Laws: America's Imperfect Pursuit of Justice; The Supreme Court: An Essential History; and The Treason Trials of Aaron Burr.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Preface vii

Acknowledgments xiii

Prologue The Pursuit of Benjamin Bache 1

1 From the Zenger Case to the First Amendment 9

2 The Federalists Pass a Sedition Act 27

3|Thomas Jefferson and James Madison Lead a Protest 51

4 Thomas Cooper's Turn Comes 73

5 Freedom of the Press on Trial 89

6 The Unforeseen (and Unintended) Consequences of the Sedition Act Crisis 113

Conclusion: The Paper Barriers 130

Chronology 135

Bibliographical Essay 139

Index 145

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)