The Frog and the Princess: And the Prince and the Mole and the Frog and the Mole and the Princess... by John Bear, Charlie Powell |, Hardcover | Barnes & Noble
The Frog and the Princess: And the Prince and the Mole and the Frog and the Mole and the Princess...

The Frog and the Princess: And the Prince and the Mole and the Frog and the Mole and the Princess...

by John Bear, Charlie Powell
     
 
What would happen to the Frog Prince story if the Princess was, herself, under a comparable curse? A wacky, circular story.

Overview

What would happen to the Frog Prince story if the Princess was, herself, under a comparable curse? A wacky, circular story.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
A fractured format divides and defeats this fractured fairy tale: half of the book tells of a princess who kisses a frog but is herself turned into a mole; at midpoint, the book can be flipped upside-down for the tale of a prince who kisses a mole and is transformed into a frog. A second kiss restores the characters to their original shapes, in effect creating a story that repeats four times. With no significant visual or textual variation in the different parts of the story, the repetition becomes not, as promised, ``a new start to the book,'' but merely tiresome, especially for children old enough to appreciate the irony in a spoof. The couplets strain (e.g., ``was'' is made to rhyme with ``because''). Flat paintings lend an odd stillness, and fail to take advantage of the opportunities in the unusual format; Powell's overtly satirical style seems too adult for the text. The many parts add up to only an extended anecdote, not a full-fledged story. Ages 6-up. (Nov.)
Children's Literature - Judy Silverman
A traditional tale with a twist,-it's a "Never-ending story." Start from either side of the book, get to the middle, follow the instructions, and start from the other side. The story turns out the same. The Prince and Princess never actually meet. Parents had better be prepared to read this book a dozen times in each direction each time they start. The verses by John Bear are rhythmic and sweet and easily memorized. Powell's illustrations are not quite realistic. Recommended for anyone who likes upside-down humor.
School Library Journal
Gr 2-4-This rhyming, fractured fairy tale begins (at either end of the book) with the product of a royal enchantment telling his/her sad tale to the princess/prince who will kiss him/her back to humankind. However, when the kiss is bestowed, with a flash of lightning and a roar of thunder, the kind princess becomes a mole, or the helpful prince a frog, and so things proceed ad nauseum. The middle double-page spread has all the characters, furniture, and other decorative objects flying topsy-turvy across the pages, but printed on each side (rightside up and upside down) are the same two verses inviting readers to either turn back to page one for more of the same story or rotate the book for a ``...new start.'' The neo-realist illustrations are colorful but static. This is billed on the cover as a ``Never-Ending Story,'' and boy, that's the truth!-Rosanne Cerny, Queens Borough Public Library, NY

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781883672072
Publisher:
Random House Children's Books
Publication date:
11/28/1994
Pages:
1
Product dimensions:
8.82(w) x 10.09(h) x 0.38(d)
Age Range:
6 - 8 Years

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