The Full Body Project: Photographs by Leonard Nimoy

Overview

In his provocative new book, photographer and actor Leonard Nimoy captures images of full-bodied women, some of whom are involved in what is known as the “fat acceptance” movement. “The average American woman,” Nimoy writes, “weighs 25 percent more than the models selling the clothes. There is a huge industry built up around selling women ways to get their bodies closer to the fantasy ideal. Pills, diets, surgery, workout programs. . . . The message is ‘You don't look right. If ...

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Overview

In his provocative new book, photographer and actor Leonard Nimoy captures images of full-bodied women, some of whom are involved in what is known as the “fat acceptance” movement. “The average American woman,” Nimoy writes, “weighs 25 percent more than the models selling the clothes. There is a huge industry built up around selling women ways to get their bodies closer to the fantasy ideal. Pills, diets, surgery, workout programs. . . . The message is ‘You don't look right. If you buy our product, you can get there.’”

Leonard Nimoy, best known to the public from his role as Spock on Star Trek, has been a lifelong photographer. His work has been widely exhibited and is in numerous private and public collections. A previous book of his photographs, Shekhina, was published in 2002.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780979472725
  • Publisher: Five Ties Publishing
  • Publication date: 11/1/2007
  • Pages: 96
  • Sales rank: 742,781
  • Product dimensions: 8.70 (w) x 11.00 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Meet the Author

Best known as an actor, Leonard Nimoy has been a lifelong photographer, and first built his own darkroom at the age of 14. He lives in Los Angeles.

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Foreword

From the Foreword by Natalie Angier:

The women in [these] photographs seize the aesthetic and emotional reins through the time-honored primate strategy called "making direct eye contact." In most artistic renditions of the nude, the subject's gaze is indirect . . . But the women here do not avert their eyes, either from the camera or from each other. They look us straight in the face and ask that we do the same. Significantly, their gaze is not hostile or defiant. It doesn't say, what are you staring at, chum? Does my fat body repel you? Nor is it campy or vampy or in the least bit embarrassed. Instead, it is the gaze of gimlet-eyed women who know perfectly well that they are on view, and that their unclothed bodies are not the standard models of beauty as brought to you by museums, the movies, or Maybelline. Yet by fixing us in the level-headed sight, the women politely but firmly demand that we begin our inspection at eye level, where the self is exposed and makes its humanness known. We get to know these women before we begin appraising their bodies. And the paradoxical result of our face-based introduction, our feeling that we understand these women as individuals and already count them as friends, is that we see their bodies less personally, relieved of any object lessons or projections of our private pieties and fears. Rather than rejecting their bodies as unacceptably obese . . . we see them almost as abstractions, an interplay of geometries, patterns, and themes. We can see them for what they are, for what every body must be: an imperfect, magnificent evolutionary compromise between the life forms that preceded it, and the life forms yet to be.
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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 23, 2007

    A reviewer

    There are several superb artists who study, observe, pose and paint/photograph models whose prime artistic interest is their corpulence: Jenny Saville, Lucien Freud, Hanneline Rogeberg, and Joel Peter Witkin are good examples. But now that list must include Leonard Nimoy whose photographs of posed full-figured females literally fill these pages. Natalie Angier provides an intelligent, sensitive Foreword to this collection, THE FULL BODY PROJECT, focusing more on the model selection and the act of creating art with women whose body images are respected, and not compromised, in the studio. What follows is a selection of fifty black and white photographs of women, both Caucasian and African American, posed like the three graces, or symbols of mythology, or simply relaxing together - very much aware that the photographer is shaping an art piece. Their eyes engage the camera, at times haughtily, at time with a glint of humor. Nimoy's time in front of the camera as an actor no doubt adds to his appreciation of reflective and absorptive surfaces and his photographs have a lush rich quality that enhances his Rubenesque models. The results are not parodies of full-bodied women but rather appreciation of the qualities these models bring to the frame. It is a book of unusual and very beautiful images and Nimoy handles his assignment with surety and finesse. Highly recommended. Grady Harp

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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