The Future Ain't What It Used to Be

Overview

General Mills. The Rockport Company. Hearst Magazines. Wendy's. Saatchi & Saatchi Advertising. These are just a few of the many companies that have depended on Iconoculture, a Minneapolis-based trend consultancy, to tell them what to plan for in the future. Now readers can get the same inside advice from The Future Ain't What It Use To Be. You'll find out: why Beehives are the communities of our future; how Technomorphing will intensify our love/hate relationship with technology; where Soul Searching will ...
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1998 Hard cover 1ST PRINTING New in new dust jacket. BRIGTHT SHINY, BRAND NEW Glued binding. 320 p. Audience: General/trade.

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Overview

General Mills. The Rockport Company. Hearst Magazines. Wendy's. Saatchi & Saatchi Advertising. These are just a few of the many companies that have depended on Iconoculture, a Minneapolis-based trend consultancy, to tell them what to plan for in the future. Now readers can get the same inside advice from The Future Ain't What It Use To Be. You'll find out: why Beehives are the communities of our future; how Technomorphing will intensify our love/hate relationship with technology; where Soul Searching will take us in the next millennium; and which Zentrepreneurs will redefine business as we know it. Best of all, Iconoculture offers practical suggestions for turning the decades ahead to your favor with their Iconogasms. More than two hundred of these pithy tips show you how to leverage trends to transform your job, your life, your world.
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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
As members of Iconoculture, a consulting organization that advises companies on how to plan for the future, the authors cite 40 key trends that businesses can utilize to transform their activities into creative and strategically smart opportunities. This practical book deals with our "love/hate relationship with technology" and explains how and why we can prosper by keeping ahead of these business trends. The work is divided into ten single-word chaptersmind, body, spirit, experience, identity, society, nature, relationships, fear, and technologythat the authors call Americans' passion points. The volume's purpose is to help the reader sift through the present maze of trends to find and understand the more important ones. With a glossary and useful listing of resources (people, places, things), this timely book is recommended for a broad audience and is especially well suited for those functioning directly in marketing.Joseph W. Leonard, Miami Univ., Oxford, Ohio
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781573220804
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA)
  • Publication date: 1/12/1998
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 270
  • Product dimensions: 7.74 (w) x 9.41 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Interviews & Essays

Before the live bn.com chat, Larry Samuel agreed to answer some of our questions:

Q: Can you recall any novel about the future that had a somewhat accurate portrayal when the year finally arrived? What is your favorite book or movie about the future?

A: George Orwell's novel 1984 is I think the seminal work about the future, as it vividly anticipated our loss of personal freedom and privacy for the sake of "security." Likewise, the film "Brazil" portrayed a world in which the system had conquered the individual, a very real fear in these video camera-everywhere-you-look times. You know we have a problem when we have to start monitoring baby-sitters.

Q: What type of future do you foresee for the Internet as a form of new media?

A: The Internet too poses a serious threat to our rights as individuals, as each time we log on we expose ourselves and release information which can be exploited. I think the Internet will become an entirely commercial-based medium, following the course of previous breakthrough communication technologies like radio and television. I don't see anything threatening capitalism or consumerism in the near future.

Q: How do you like living in Minneapolis?

A: The Twin Cities is a great place to live (I say through my gritted teeth as the temperature falls and the snow piles up). There's plenty to do if you're so inclined and there are few of the annoyances of big cities like traffic jams during the day or people wearing black every day.

Q: Can you tip us off to anything that you see as becoming "hot" in the next year?

A: Things that may become "hot" (don't you hate that word?) in the next year or two include:

  • Napping at work (sanctioned napping, that is)
  • "Fashionceuticals" (clothes with health and beauty aids woven into the fibers)
  • Body armor (bulletproof clothing)
  • Martini smoothies (two trends in one)
  • Aromatherapy cigarettes
  • Corporate branding of sports teams (Nike Cowboys? Wheaties Twins)
  • Legal same-sex marriages at state level
  • Coupling of television and computers (IBM/Sony Thinkatron)
  • Legitimate third-party campaign team (Ted & Jane)
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