×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

The Future of Food
     

The Future of Food

by Brian J. Ford
 
Eminent biologist Brian J. Ford makes an incisive contribution to the raging debate on how food is produced and its effect on our health. He examines the food-borne diseases that have always been with us, such as Salmonella and E. coli, as well as those that that have recently emerged, like Listeriosis and new variant CJD.

He reveals many misconceptions in current

Overview

Eminent biologist Brian J. Ford makes an incisive contribution to the raging debate on how food is produced and its effect on our health. He examines the food-borne diseases that have always been with us, such as Salmonella and E. coli, as well as those that that have recently emerged, like Listeriosis and new variant CJD.

He reveals many misconceptions in current popular thinking about food, including so-called natural foods, and discusses the role of organic farming. While he advises caution on GM foods, he is enthusiastic about the foods of the future made from new or little-known sources. There are insights on the nutrients that we need for health at different stages of life, on food allergies and intolerances, on the fascinating relationship between food and culture, and on the changing theories about the ideal diet.

Agriculture is the biggest industry in the world, yet nutrition remains a Cinderella science. Food influences our physical and mental health, underpins our social structures and often dictates the political agenda. A food revolution could change the world.

Editorial Reviews

KLIATT
This book is part of the Prospects for Tomorrow series, aimed at sharpening readers' critical thinking about the choices that will affect our planet's future. Ford, a respected British biologist, became immersed in the food industry while hosting a UK television series (Food for Thought) that dealt with many of the issues outlined in this book: How will our diet change in the future? What can we do about growing levels of malnutrition in Africa and other parts of the globe? What does recent research tell us about obesity, diet and the elderly, and harmful chemicals in our food? How is cultural change affecting our eating patterns? Why are food-borne diseases proliferating and what should we do about it? How safe is genetically engineered food? Can the future feed the world? (Ford makes a particularly convincing argument for establishing an international "Food Force" that would dispatch food to the hungry after major disasters.) You may find some of Ford's predictions rather far-fetched. Will fungi really come to the fore as a food source as meat disappears from Western diets? Will kitchens really disappear from many homes in the future? Will a decline in supermarkets really be accompanied by resurgence in small, locally owned shops where "there will be no interminable queue at the till"? (Note the British flavor of Ford's prose.) In any case, the book provides plenty of fascinating "food for thought" and really is, as Ford suggests, "for everyone who eats food." KLIATT Codes: JSA—Recommended for junior and senior high school students, advanced students, and adults. 2000, Norton/Thames & Hudson, 120p, 22cm, 99-66983, $12.95. Ages 13 to adult. Reviewer: Gloria Levine;Freelance Education Writer, Potomac, MD, November 2000 (Vol. 34 No. 6)
Kirkus Reviews
Even for those who rarely think beyond their next meal, food is an inescapable part of the future. Here, a British biologist tries to foretell what's likely to end up on our table in years to come. Ford (Patterns of Sex, 1980) begins with the basics. Food, whatever its origin, must supply essential nutrients: fats, carbohydrates, proteins, minerals, and vitamins. The importance of many of these nutrients has been known for over a century, and yet a large fraction of the world's population still suffers from basic dietary deficiencies. In industrial countries, cookery is a dying art; three-fourths of American meals are prepared outside the home. The economics of food production have key implications: a decline in meat-eating is likely to occur in the near future, for example, less on account of health issues than economic ones (the same amount of grain required to raise one pound of beef could make sixteen pounds of bread). On the other hand, changes in food processing leave us vulnerable to a wide range of food-borne disease, from "mad cow" disease to toxin-producing E. coli. The potential dangers of genetic engineering remain to be discovered, although genetically modified foods are already on the market. Ford calls for greater public consultation, clearer labeling, and more stringent testing and regulation. Meanwhile, some 800 million people, most of them women and children, go hungry. International cooperation, possibly in the form of some quasi-military Food Force, may be the only long-range way to distribute food equitably. In developing countries, Ford predicts a decrease in meat consumption and an increasing reliance on tasty but highly nutritious snack foods andmeatsubstitutes. And while the "meal in a pill" beloved by sci-fi writers may well come to be, it will still need to be supplemented by traditional foodstuffs to insure a proper balance of nutrients. A provocative if somewhat unfocused look at a subject near and dear to everyone.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780500280751
Publisher:
Thames & Hudson
Publication date:
01/28/2000
Series:
Prospects for Tomorrow Series
Pages:
112
Product dimensions:
5.40(w) x 8.47(h) x 0.50(d)

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews