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The Future of Music

Overview

(Berklee Press). For the next generation of players and downloaders, a provocative scenario from a music industry think tank. From the Music Research Institute at Berklee College of Music comes a manifesto for the ongoing music revolution. Today, the record companies may be hurting but the music-making business is booming, using non-traditional digital methods and distribution models. This book explains why we got where we are and where we are heading. For the iPod, downloading market, this book will explain new ways of discovering music, new ...
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Overview

(Berklee Press). For the next generation of players and downloaders, a provocative scenario from a music industry think tank. From the Music Research Institute at Berklee College of Music comes a manifesto for the ongoing music revolution. Today, the record companies may be hurting but the music-making business is booming, using non-traditional digital methods and distribution models. This book explains why we got where we are and where we are heading. For the iPod, downloading market, this book will explain new ways of discovering music, new ways of acquiring it and how technology trends will make music "flow like water," benefiting the people who love music and make music.
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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
In what could be one of the most provocative music books published this year, two innovators in music technology take a fascinating look at the impact of the digital revolution on the music business and predict "a future in which music will be like water: ubiquitous and free-flowing." Kusek and Leonhard foresee the disappearance of CDs and record stores as we know them in the next decade; consumers will have access to more products than ever, though, through a vast range of digital radio channels, person-to-person Internet file sharing and a host of subscription services. The authors are especially good at describing how the way current record companies operate-as both owners and distributors of music, with artists making less than executives-will also drastically change: individual CD sales, for example, will be replaced by "a very potent `liquid' pricing system that incorporates subscriptions, bundles of various media types, multi-access deals, and added-value services." While the authors often shift from analysts into cheerleaders for the uber-wired future they predict-"Let's replace inefficient content-protection schemes with effective means of sharing-control and superdistribution!"-their clearly written and groundbreaking book is the first major statement of what may be "the new digital reality" of the music business in the future. (Feb.) Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Soundview Executive Book Summaries
Music visionaries David Kusek and Gerd Leonhard have looked deeply into the future of the digital music revolution, and have unearthed many crucial ideas that can help those inside and outside the music business understand the current state of the industry and where it is heading. While explaining the history of digital music, the "top-10 truths of the music business" and the latest marketing strategies that are working, the authors also debunk the most popular myths surrounding the music industry, and describe how the "'Net Generation" thinks. Copyright © 2005 Soundview Executive Book Summaries
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780876390597
  • Publisher: Hal Leonard Corporation
  • Publication date: 3/1/2005
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Pages: 208
  • Sales rank: 1,376,578
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.00 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments ix
Introduction x
1 Music Like Water 1
A Digital Music Primer 4
Music Today 6
The Ubiquity of Water 8
Utilities 10
Music: A Product or Service? 12
2 Our Top-10 Truths of the Music Business 19
3 Futurizing Some Popular Music Industry Myths 35
4 The Future of Music Marketing and Promotion 56
Traditional Radio: The Death of the DJ 58
Internet Radio and Podcasting: The Infinite Array of Choices 61
Satellite Radio: The Return of the DJ 62
Music Television: What a Lovely Ride It Was 63
Sponsorship: The Lure of Cool 64
Direct Marketing: Knowing Your Customers 66
Video Games: Targeting Players with New Music 69
Cell Phones and Wireless: Direct Marketing on Steroids 70
Marketing Lessons from an Unlikely Source 72
5 The Future of Music Distribution and Acquisition 80
The Demise of the CD 81
The End of the Replacement Cycle 82
The Changing Face of Music Retail 86
The Future of Music Retailing 88
What Not to Do: The Criminalization of File-Sharing 93
6 The Digital Kids and the Changing Marketplace 97
The 'Net Generation 98
File-Sharing 100
Too Much Money 102
Mixed Messages: Have Your Cake and Eat It, Too? 103
Oldies but Goldies 104
Music Companies Must Embrace the Digital Future 104
7 A New Music Economy 107
Long Time Gone: A Perfectly Broken System 108
Pennies from Heaven 110
Independent Labels 111
Live Performance and Touring 114
Merchandising 117
Mixtapes, MP3 Blogs, and File-Sharing 119
CD Pricing 121
Singles Pricing 123
Compensation 125
Why Can't File-Sharing Be a Winner for Everybody? 127
New Operating Mantras 129
New Licensing Approaches 130
A Digital Utility License for Media Companies 135
A New Type of Music Company 136
8 How Technology Will Rewire the Music Business 139
Historical Perspectives 142
Technology in the Hands of Artists 143
The Ravages of Free 145
The Digital Chastity Belt 148
Honey vs. the Stick 152
Music Recommendation 154
Music Recognition 156
Digital A&R Empowerment 157
Upgradeable Music: Try-and-Buy Models 158
Integrated Music Experiences 159
9 Megatrends that Will Impact the Future of Music 160
The Accelerating Pace and Scope of Diversity 161
The Changing Paradigms of Work and Leisure 165
The Unobtrusive Expansion of Technology 167
The Overload of Information and Media 168
The Surveillance Society and Concerns of Privacy 170
Heart over Brain 171
10 Onto the Future 174
Index 177
About the Authors 191
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Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 13, 2005

    People need to appreciate the tangible record!!!!!!!!

    Some of the greatest works of art have been on the covers of records. Record stores are a dying breed. People use to talk and meet in them. People use to listen to albums without a computer. Do your ears a favor and listen to an album for the sake of the music rather than obsessing over a new electronic gadget that allows you to download music at the bus station. This book is encouraging people to become robots. Nuff said.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 13, 2011

    Eh

    Nobody knows what is going to happen in the future. This book is simply boring and anti-record label.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 13, 2005

    Positive perspective might prove to be perfect...

    Through my own enlightenment I decided a while back to stop downloading albums from the Internet for free. I now use iTunes online music store, or I go to an actually CD retailer and buy my favorite music. While this is a breakthrough in my life, I¿m afraid others might not ever come to grips with the reality of illegal online downloading. This has bothered me for sometime now but I never really thought anyone would do anything about it, because of computer hackers and software developers always a step ahead of the good guys. The Future of Music has shown me that there IS hope. This new plan to make music like running water, or a utility, is a great idea. The idea is that users will pay a monthly bill just like their water, electricity or cable. The book also dives into the new markets of cell phone ring tones, Internet radio, and the use of music in video games. The author¿s can clearly see the direction the industry is headed, and they¿re ideas are a great start to what might turn into a musical revolution. This is a great book for anyone looking to get a head start on the competition, or just want to look through the crystal ball and into the future.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 15, 2005

    The crystal ball for the digital music arena

    If you want a reality check in terms of where things are headed in the digital music world, look no further than this book. It's thought-provoking and insightful, from two of the sharpest veterans in the business. Spot-on insights. Do yourself a favor and buy this book. Highly recommended!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 1, 2009

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 15, 2009

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