The Gamblers

The Gamblers

4.6 3
by Norman L. Wolfson
     
 

Gambling is risky business, especially for recreational gamers. All casino poker rooms are populated 24/7 by serious players capable of emptying the pockets of any less experienced guests. While predators and crooks are a minority, they are there; these types seek out the uninitiated and rarely fail to deplete their bankrolls. Even a few dealers are out to make an…  See more details below

Overview

Gambling is risky business, especially for recreational gamers. All casino poker rooms are populated 24/7 by serious players capable of emptying the pockets of any less experienced guests. While predators and crooks are a minority, they are there; these types seek out the uninitiated and rarely fail to deplete their bankrolls. Even a few dealers are out to make an easy buck, but the house and fellow players tend to keep that minority in line. Still, the poker room is a better bet than the house games, at which even professionals become losers over the long haul. All the author learned over thirty years of visiting casinos a couple of times a week is told in The Gamblers.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780595356416
Publisher:
iUniverse, Incorporated
Publication date:
06/28/2005
Pages:
120
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.28(d)

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The Gamblers 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Never mind the World Series of Poker with its ten-thousand-dollar buy-ins and the fictitious multi-million-dollar pots. Forget the hole-card cams and on-screen graphics. ¿The Gamblers¿ takes you eloquently and roughly into for-real hard-ball casino poker where every dollar you bet is your own. When you lose (which is most of the time) it¿s agony. And when you win: nirvana! Norman L. Wolfson¿s favorite place to visit his money is the Borgata Casino in Atlantic City and his favorite time to go there is pre-dawn. On the way ¿there is the sudden urge to make a bathroom stop. Never fails.¿ He resists the urge because he knows that as soon as he arrives and looks at his hole cards, his mind focuses and his urinary track shifts back to normal. Wolfson writes with real emotion about his love-hate relationship to casino poker: All the nice people, who wear everything from business suits to sweat suits. The guys, the dolls, the dead money players and the heavy hitters. As Wolfson takes you through the marbled walls that echo with the clanging bells of the one-arm-bandits into the poker room, you meet some of the greats of the game: Doyle Brunson, Edwin Yancey, Hardway Sam, Bill Boyd, Puggy Pearson, Big Jim Dolan. And then there are the predators, the cheaters and the crooked dealers. He loves them all for the color and verve they give to his favorite pastime. (Be sure to read about Sue Mi, the ¿poker dog¿ who tells Wolfson when to raise.) But he also is bluntly realistic about your (or his) chances of winning. ¿If you¿re an average player in house games or the poker room, you¿re a loser,¿ he says. Wolfson ought to know. He has been gambling for 30 years and playing casino poker for 20 years. In that time he estimates he has invested (lost) $120,00. But: ¿All I can say is I¿d rather die than give up the challenge and pleasure I get from the game.¿
Guest More than 1 year ago
Whether its your first time at the table or the casino is your second home, The Gamblers takes a deep look at the wolrd of poker . This easy read introduces you to the many characters, good and bad, who frequent the poker scene. And while you are engrossed in the personalities, you are also learning the do's and the don'ts of the newsest craze, poker.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Whether you want to risk a thousand dollars or ten thousand dollars, no normally reckless reader can finish THE GAMBLERS by Norman Wolfson without rushing down to Atlantic City and spending three or four days at the Borgata playing poker, whether it is Texas hold¿em or stud. What a magnificent essential masculine experience! I¿m gonna go!