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The Genealogy of Greek Mythology: An Ilustrated Family Tree of Greek Myth from the First Godsto the Founders of R
     

The Genealogy of Greek Mythology: An Ilustrated Family Tree of Greek Myth from the First Godsto the Founders of R

4.4 5
by Vanessa James
 

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A stunning, fully illustrated and comprehensively annotated genealogical map of the universe of Greek myth, presented in a unique, easy-to-use format. From the television hit Xena, to the Oscar-winning box-office smash Gladiator and to Broadway's Medea, the sagas of antiquity continue to attract avid audiences. Now the lore and legend of Ancient

Overview

A stunning, fully illustrated and comprehensively annotated genealogical map of the universe of Greek myth, presented in a unique, easy-to-use format. From the television hit Xena, to the Oscar-winning box-office smash Gladiator and to Broadway's Medea, the sagas of antiquity continue to attract avid audiences. Now the lore and legend of Ancient Greece have been distilled into one spectacularly illustrated resource. The Genealogy of Greek Mythology brings to life the complete cast of characters, mortal and mythic alike. Accompanied by more than 125 captivating full-color photographs of art and artifacts, the narratives and bloodlines mapped out in The Genealogy of Greek Mythology are wonderfully user friendly. Beginning with Chaos-the period before the Earth was born-Vanessa James traces the succession of gods and titans through to the first generations of historically verifiable people of the ancient Aegean. Packed with over 3,000 entries, this incredibly detailed resource also features a star chart, regional map, and who's who guide to the Olympian gods. Each side of the book's unique accordion-paged design can be perused section-by-section or fanned out to reveal the entire genealogy in more than seventeen elegant feet.

Editorial Reviews

The New Yorker
You wait thousands of years for a family tree of all the Greek gods, and then two come along at once. The first, A Genealogical Chart of Greek Mythology, began in 1964 as the hobby of the late Harold Newman and was recently completed by Jon O. Newman, his son. An enterprise of Daedalian complexity, the complete chart spreads along seventy-two huge pages and contains 3,673 mythological figures, all interrelated and ultimately descended from Chaos, a primal force mentioned by Hesiod who is the great-great-grandparent of Zeus. The sexual activity of classical deities does not lend itself to neat tabulation; Zeus and Apollo, notoriously promiscuous, appear with alarming frequency. Undeterred, the Newmans (both lawyers) list alternate kinships in the index and maintain that there is a "high degree of generational consistency," so that, for instance, many of the participants in the Trojan War seem to be "within just two generations of each other."

A less forbidding version appears next month in the form of The Genealogy of Greek Mythology, by Vanessa James (Gotham). James eliminates some of the more arcane characters and includes illustrations and short explanatory paragraphs alongside the names. Printed on one long concertinalike page, the table can be read like a book or unfolded into a seventeen-foot-long frieze -- gods on one side, mortals on the other. Simplification has its benefits; the knotty ways of Greek heredity can ensnare even the most organized mind. As James comments with tactful understatement, "The Greek practice of marrying nieces to their uncles further confuses strict distinctions between generations."( Leo Carey)
School Library Journal
Adult/High School-This beautiful, creative family tree has been ingeniously bound to be shelved and read as a book or unfolded into a dazzling 17-foot-long table. The book/chart begins with the earliest surviving account of the creation of the universe from Chaos and quickly covers the children of Gaia, the rise of the Titans, and the triumph of the Olympians. The origins of each of the Olympians, their symbols, and their characters are briefly described. James does not neglect the less-well-known deities. The gods of wind, rivers, and oceans are included, as well as other immortals, such as Atlas and Medea. Lists of the gods' children are followed by an index of 3000-plus individuals. When the book is turned over, it opens to a large map of the Aegean Sea, showing the places associated with mythic heroes. This begins the genealogical chart of the mortals who participated in the Trojan War, starting with their immortal ancestors and concluding with their descendants. A map of the Mediterranean Sea shows the routes of the Argonauts, Aeneas, and Odysseus. Lists of Helen's suitors, the 12 labors of Hercules, and more conclude the volume. James used a variety of Greek and Roman sources. When presented with conflicting accounts, she gave preference to Greek writers. The retellings are necessarily brief, and there are omissions. This book would supplement standard guides such as those by Edith Hamilton and Thomas Bulfinch. Traditional mythology books include modern engravings or no art at all. The appeal here is in the beauty of the more than 125 color photographs of Greek and Roman artwork, the concise biographies, and the elegant ordering of a complex topic.-Kathy Tewell, Chantilly Regional Library, VA Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781592400133
Publisher:
Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
Publication date:
09/15/2003
Pages:
208
Product dimensions:
4.66(w) x 12.40(h) x 0.88(d)
Age Range:
18 - 14 Years

Meet the Author

Vanessa James, Ph.D., is an associate professor of theater at Mount Holyoke College, and has served as an art director for film, television, and stage productions, as well as shows at the Brooklyn Academy of Music and New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art. Her work has garnered three Emmy nominations and an Emmy Citation, and she has received several grants from the National Endowment for the Arts. 

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The Genealogy of Greek Mythology: An Ilustrated Family Tree of Greek Myth from the First Godsto the Founders of R 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book about the genealogy of the Greek Gods was an extremely detailed tree of Gods, stories, and people. It starts of with the Greek version of genesis with Gaea and Uranus. Then it describes the Titans and how Prometheus created humans out of clay. I feel that it really relates to many of the topics we study in my world religions class. For example during our Christianity and Judaism unit, we discussed how God formed our world step by step. The Greek version of the beginning is similar were it starts off as darkness and chaos and eventually leads to Gaea, mother earth and the sky, Uranus. At first, when I was choosing a book to read and review for my class, I was not sure if the topics in this book would connect and relate to the major world religions studied in my class, however, many of the concepts and ideas in Greek mythology are mirrored in the religions and cultures we have today. For example, both Hinduism and Greek mythology have different versions of Gods that represent different aspects or things.  Furthermore, this book recalled my childhood memories of reading Percy Jackson and different stories of the Greek Gods. I feel that I made a good choice choosing this book as it expressed different components of Greek mythology really well. This book is great for anyone interested in Greek mythology.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
excellent, gives an amazing illustration of the entire divine greek family
ThunderDan More than 1 year ago
An incredible amount of information packaged nicely into a 17 foot family tree. Includes breif synopsis of most important figures. This book was very helpful for my mythology class as well as personal research.