The Geneva Bible: A Facsimile of the 1560 Edition

Overview

"Johannes Gutenberg's invention of the moveable type printing press in the mid-Fifteenth Century made possible the explosion of new Bible translations in the Sixteenth Century. Among others William Tyndale, Miles Coverdale and Thomas Matthew sought to cast the scriptures in the common peoples' language so that, as Tyndale put it, "the boy that driveth the plough should know more of [them]" than the educated man." "But translating the Word of God into the vernacular was a risky occupation: ecclesiastically-charged word choices made for the English ...
See more details below
Hardcover
$46.15
BN.com price
(Save 34%)$69.95 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (14) from $37.89   
  • New (11) from $45.18   
  • Used (3) from $37.89   
Sending request ...

Overview

"Johannes Gutenberg's invention of the moveable type printing press in the mid-Fifteenth Century made possible the explosion of new Bible translations in the Sixteenth Century. Among others William Tyndale, Miles Coverdale and Thomas Matthew sought to cast the scriptures in the common peoples' language so that, as Tyndale put it, "the boy that driveth the plough should know more of [them]" than the educated man." "But translating the Word of God into the vernacular was a risky occupation: ecclesiastically-charged word choices made for the English text and the nature of the commentary that often accompanied it had the potential of challenging the authority of royalty and clerics alike." "An adherent to Catholicism, Henry's daughter Queen Mary actively persecuted the Protestant Church when she took the throne. Many Protestant leaders fled to continental Europe to avoid imprisonment or execution as a result of this turmoil and Geneva, Switzerland became a center for biblical textual scholarship by the 1550's. It was there that a number of the leading lights in Protestantism gathered to undertake a fresh translation of the scriptures into English, beginning in 1556." "The Genevans referred to a wide range of resources during the course of their translation work. They availed themselves of modern Bibles in English (particularly Coverdale's 1539 revision of Matthew, popularly known as the "Great Bible") and French (Pierre Robert Olivetans and Robert Estienne's translations). The scholars also consulted recent editions of the scriptures in Hebrew, Greek and Latin that were themselves the products of Protestant refugees living in Geneva." "The first fruit of the Geneva translators was anedition of the Book of Psalms (published in February, 1559) celebrating Queen Elizabeth's accession to the throne of England the previous November. Elizabeth's rule ended persecution of the Protestants. Catholic bishops were deprived of their sees, the Church of England was restored and Edward VI's decree that a Bible should be placed in every church was reinstated. Many Protestants returned from exile as a consequence of these welcome measures." "The Book of Psalms had important features that would be emblematic of the Geneva Bible as well. Among these were text printed in readable roman type, italic type for words not in the original Hebrew and marks placed over the accented syllables to aid in pronouncing Hebrew proper names." "The Geneva Bible itself, appearing in April or May 1560, boasted further innovations that expanded its utility. These included division of the text into numbered verses, the placement of textual and explanatory commentary in the margins, maps, woodcuts illustrating biblical scenes and words or phrases at the heads of pages to promote scripture memorization." "Now there was an English Bible that met the needs of both clergy and laity. It can be argued that the Geneva Bible's greatest contribution was its ancillary commentary, which undergirded the emerging practice of sermonizing and helped foster scripture literacy." "From 1575 until 1618 at least one new edition of the Geneva Bible appeared each year. Unlike earlier Bibles that were only available in unwieldy folio volumes, the Geneva Bible was printed in a range of smaller sizes that made the Bible more portable and affordable to a greater audience. And while the Authorized Version of 1611 (King James Version) would eventually supplant the Geneva Bible in popularity, it is estimated that material from the latter accounted for nineteen per cent of the finished text of the AV." English settlers that voyaged to the New World favored the Geneva Bible. It is probable that the Geneva Bible came to America in 1607 and was used in the Jamestown colony. Thirteen years later the Pilgrims brought it with them on the Mayflower's perilous voyage to religious freedom.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781598562125
  • Publisher: Hendrickson Publishers, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 11/28/2007
  • Sales rank: 229,934
  • Product dimensions: 7.50 (w) x 9.50 (h) x 2.50 (d)

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 7 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 22, 2012

    Recommended for history and English students

    I purchased this Bible to discover the "Bible of the Puritans". It is similiar to the King James Bible, but written in Elizabethan English. After some practice, it was easier to read and understand. I would not substitute this Bible for a good modern version, but it is enjoyable for historic reasons. It is one of the oldest English translations and appears to be fairly accurate. NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC in a recent issue describes the Geneva Bible as the beloved Bible at the start of the 17th century. Eventually the King James Bible replaced it.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 19, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 18, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 11, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 14, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 7, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 15, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 7 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)