The Geography of You and Me [NOOK Book]

Overview

Lucy lives on the twenty-fourth floor. Owen lives in the basement. It's fitting, then, that they meet in the middle -- stuck between two floors of a New York City apartment building, on an elevator rendered useless by a citywide blackout. After they're rescued, Lucy and Owen spend the night wandering the darkened streets and marveling at the rare appearance of stars above Manhattan. But once the power is back, so is reality. Lucy soon moves ...
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The Geography of You and Me

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Overview

Lucy lives on the twenty-fourth floor. Owen lives in the basement. It's fitting, then, that they meet in the middle -- stuck between two floors of a New York City apartment building, on an elevator rendered useless by a citywide blackout. After they're rescued, Lucy and Owen spend the night wandering the darkened streets and marveling at the rare appearance of stars above Manhattan. But once the power is back, so is reality. Lucy soon moves abroad with her parents, while Owen heads out west with his father.

The brief time they spend together leaves a mark. And as their lives take them to Edinburgh and to San Francisco, to Prague and to Portland, Lucy and Owen stay in touch through postcards, occasional e-mails, and phone calls. But can they -- despite the odds -- find a way to reunite?

Smartly observed and wonderfully romantic, Jennifer E. Smith's new novel shows that the center of the world isn't necessarily a place. Sometimes, it can be a person.
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Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal
03/01/2014
Gr 7 Up—Lucy and Owen meet in a stalled elevator in their New York City apartment building when a blackout affects the northeast. The two are rescued and spend the remaining night wandering the dark streets, admiring the star-filled sky, and picnicking on the roof. The next morning the power returns and with it the reality of their situation. The two are pulled in opposite directions as Lucy and her family move to London and Owen and his father trek westward across the United States. Although they are separated by thousands of miles, the teens can't forget each other. Though fate initially brought them together, it is up to them to engineer a way to meet again. This contemporary YA novel focuses on themes of family, life after loss, and long-distance relationships. Readers will enjoy experiencing different cities and countries through the protagonists' eyes. Fans of Sarah Dessen, Elizabeth Eulberg, and Susane Colasanti will enjoy Smith's latest meet-cute romance.—Tiffany Davis, Mount Saint Mary College, Newburgh, NY
Publishers Weekly
02/17/2014
Owen and Lucy meet when they get stuck in a New York City elevator during a widespread power outage. They quickly connect, spending an intimate (but chaste) night looking at stars from the roof of their building. When the electricity returns, so do real-life complications: Owen and his father, devastated by his mother’s recent death, decide to drive west for a fresh start; meanwhile, Lucy moves to Scotland for her father’s work. At first, they stay in touch—Owen mails sweet postcards, and Lucy sends “slightly rambling” emails—but they begin to doubt the strength of their connection (“How long could a single night really be expected to last?” Lucy wonders). Smith (This Is What Happy Looks Like) has written a sweet, moody story that can also be deeply heartbreaking, as when Owen and his father return to pack up their old house, only to find “the real measures of the lives here were now well and truly gone.” There are plenty of romantic sigh-worthy moments, too, but it’s Owen and Lucy’s individual journeys that really hit home. Ages 12–up. Agent: Jennifer Joel, ICM. (Apr.)
From the Publisher
* "The meet-cute master behind The Statistical Probability of Love at First Sight and This Is What Happy Looks Like delivers her best book yet, a straightforward, old-fashioned swoon-fest that, in another time, would be a film starring Audrey Hepburn."—Booklist, starred review

* "Fans of Smith's previous works, namely The Statistical Probability of Love at First Sight, and other love stories like John Green's The Fault in Our Stars and David Levithan's Every Day will like this novel, which is a similar combination of head and heart...A welcome addition to any library."—VOYA, starred review

"A heart-shaking exploration of a fragile long-distance relationship...Deftly romantic and anchored in an age when the Internet has made long distance a much more familiar concept for teenagers, this is a fantastic story."—Vanity Fair

"Truth about love always gets our attention, and this book will catch readers'."—Kirkus Reviews

"Fans of Sarah Dessen, Elizabeth Eulberg, and Susane Colasanti will enjoy Smith's latest meet-cute romance."—SLJ

"Smith has written a sweet, moody story that can also be deeply heartbreaking...There are plenty of romantic sigh-worthy moments, too, but it's Owen and Lucy's individual journeys that really hit home."—Publishers Weekly

"Smith captures the romantic sparks that fly in unusual situations and the way love can build even when circumstances keep people apart. If you like your romances with a bit of European adventure, some New York glamour, and a lot of honest heart, this one's for you."—E. Lockhart, author of The Boyfriend List and The Disreputable History of Frankie Landau-Banks

"The greatest space between two people is measured in emotions, not miles. The Geography of You and Me is a true, tender long-distance love story guaranteed to strike a resonant chord in hopeful romantics everywhere."—Megan McCafferty, bestselling author of the Jessica Darling series and Bumped

"Jennifer E. Smith represents the absolute best in YA writing, and readers will carry this poignant love story in their hearts long after the last sentence is read."—Susane Colasanti, bestselling author of When It Happens

"The Geography of You and Me is a magic, magic book. It will take you to a place where we all want to live, where true love overcomes any distance."—Huntley Fitzpatrick, author of My Life Next Door and What I Thought Was True

"If it was just a travel story or just a love story, The Geography of You and Me would still be perfect, but it's both and more. I loved this book!"—Lauren Morrill, author of Meant to Be and Being Sloane Jacobs

E. Lockhart
"Smith captures the romantic sparks that fly in unusual situations and the way love can build even when circumstances keep people apart. If you like your romances with a bit of European adventure, some New York glamour, and a lot of honest heart, this one's for you."
Megan McCafferty
"The greatest space between two people is measured in emotions, not miles. The Geography of You and Me is a true, tender long-distance love story guaranteed to strike a resonant chord in hopeful romantics everywhere."
Susane Colasanti
"Jennifer E. Smith represents the absolute best in YA writing, and readers will carry this poignant love story in their hearts long after the last sentence is read."
Huntley Fitzpatrick
"The Geography of You and Me is a magic, magic book. It will take you to a place where we all want to live, where true love overcomes any distance."
Lauren Morrill
"If it was just a travel story or just a love story, The Geography of You and Me would still be perfect, but it's both and more. I loved this book!"
starred review Booklist
* "The meet-cute master behind The Statistical Probability of Love at First Sight and This Is What Happy Looks Like delivers her best book yet, a straightforward, old-fashioned swoon-fest that, in another time, would be a film starring Audrey Hepburn."
VOYA, June 2014 (Vol. 37, No. 2) - Kate Neff
Lucy and Owen meet one fateful afternoon in New York City when all the power goes off; they are then split apart abruptly afterward when Lucy’s family moves to Scotland and Owen and his father embark on a cross-county journey to find a new home. While Lucy is well-to-do and has parents who love her but do not show it in the traditional sense, Owen and his father have plenty of love between them but are grieving the recent loss of Owen’s mother. Although they come from very different backgrounds and only have one night together, the two find themselves attracted to each other like magnets, no matter where they end up on the globe. Lucy jumps from Scotland to London, and Owen travels from Chicago to Seattle, but their affections never wear thin, despite one upsetting meeting they have in San Francisco. Fans of Smith’s previous works, namely The Statistical Probability Of Love At First Sight (Little, Brown, 2012/Voya February 2012), and other love stories like John Green’s The Fault In Our Stars (Penguin, 2012/Voya April 2012) and David Levithan’s Every Day (Random House, 2012/Voya December 2012) will like this novel, which is a similar combination of head and heart. The book is perfectly wholesome, without any harsh language or sexual content, so it will be a welcome addition to any library. Reviewer: Kate Neff; Ages 15 to 18.
Children's Literature - Heidi Hauser Green
When a blackout occurs, the elevator stops. Lucy, a long-time resident of an apartment on the twenty-fourth floor, and Owen, a new resident of the basement-level building superintendent’s apartment, are stranded. A kinship forms and, after their rescue, they spend a memorable night together in the city’s darkened streets and on their building’s rooftop. Falling asleep beneath a canopy of stars—celestial bodies generally not visible due to New York City’s bright lights—they each feel a sense of happiness. But the next day lacks the same magic. Owen’s dad has walked back from Coney Island; when Owen finds him, he is severely dehydrated, and the teen spends the day nursing him back to health. As soon as the power is back on, Lucy’s parents summon her to London. They are barely reunited at the apartment a week later when Owen is headed west with his dad, while Lucy is flying to Scotland. As Owen wanders across the western United States and Lucy moves throughout Europe, what will happen to their blossoming romance? Jennifer E. Smith presents a moving romantic tale of love ignited, disrupted and—dare we hope—rekindled. Readers will enjoy this heartfelt story of love lost and found. Those who want more can look for Smith’s The Statistical Probability of Love at First Sight. Reviewer: Heidi Hauser Green; Ages 12 up.
Kirkus Reviews
2014-03-03
As she did in The Statistical Probability of Love at First Sight (2012), Smith fashions long-distance travel into a metaphor for the leaps of faith that love demands. Lucy and Owen live in the same Manhattan building but don't meet until they're stuck in a sweltering elevator during a blackout. Their brief ordeal's long enough for them to connect while their defenses are down. Grief over his mother's death has numbed Owen to his changed life—moving from rural Pennsylvania with his father, now the building's superintendent. With her affluent parents abroad and her brothers newly away at college, Lucy's long-standing loneliness has acquired a sharp edge. The blackout continues after they're rescued, and dealing with it together shatters the cocoon each lives in. They ramble the crowded streets before ascending to the roof, where they fall asleep under a starry sky. When Lucy wakes up, Owen's gone; his dad needs help managing the blackout's aftermath. By the time they reconnect, Lucy's moving abroad, while Owen and his newly unemployed dad are heading west. The alternating narration builds tension as the two both live their separate lives and recollect their fragile bond, giving readers access to the closely observed emotions of each, something neither has. If the emotional authenticity points up less-believable plot points (if only applying to college were so easy!), it also eclipses those lapses. Truth about love always gets our attention, and this book will catch readers'. (Fiction. 12-18)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780316254748
  • Publisher: Little, Brown Books for Young Readers
  • Publication date: 4/15/2014
  • Sold by: Hachette Digital, Inc.
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 352
  • Sales rank: 15,675
  • Age range: 12 - 17 Years
  • File size: 710 KB

Meet the Author

Jennifer E. Smith
Jennifer E. Smith is the author of This Is What Happy Looks Like, The Statistical Probability of Love at First Sight, The Storm Makers, You Are Here, and The Comeback Season. She earned a master's degree in creative writing from the University of St. Andrews in Scotland, and her work has been translated into twenty-nine languages.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 18 )
Rating Distribution

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(7)

4 Star

(5)

3 Star

(5)

2 Star

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Sort by: Showing all of 18 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 17, 2014

    Exactly what i was looking for!

    I wanted a cute book to read for the day, and that's exactly what i got out of this book! I was first interested by the title and the cover, but the book proved to be just as interesting! It's the perfect read if you are looking for a cute, light-hearted story.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 20, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    I have read Smith's previous two books, The Statistical Probabil

    I have read Smith's previous two books, The Statistical Probability of Love at First Sight and This is What Happy Looks Like. I personally liked the first more than the second but even then, both books didn't wow me. I am a huge contemporary fan so I read a ton of contemporaries and I felt I was missing the wow factor. However, I wanted to read The Geography of You and Me because I wanted to give her writing another try and because of the intriguing synopsis. While I also wasn't wowed by this book, I can point out that this would be many people's cup of tea. I ended up giving it 3 stars which is a rating that means I liked the book but I did have a couple of issues with it. So the synopsis, have I mentioned how awesome it is? I like books told in 24 hours or we witness the lives of the main protagonists at a slower pace than we're used to. Also the whole idea of getting stuck with a hot stranger in an elevator made it sound exciting. However, I just felt that the author didn't grasp the full potential of such a setting. The whole elevator scene was short, as well as the night they spent exploring Manhattan. I wished we got more. I feel that I always say that for Smith's books. I wanted more exploring, more adventure, activities, and more emotions.  Lucy and Owen meet up for that half day then each are whisked into their own lives. Lucy has to move across the atlantic ocean while Owen's dad is going traveling across the US in hopes of getting a job. There was some great background with both their families and just emotional depth but I just wasn't invested. I honestly don't know if it's a "it's me, not you" thing with Smith's books. I can never fully enjoy them while so many people do. I did start getting interested when Lucy and Owen started building up their own lives alone.. but then I get pushed right out of the caring circle because of their obsession for each other. They've only known each other for 24 hours, at least a third of that was spend on them asleep so I just don't get how they just couldn't move on from this. They both get a girlfriend/boyfriend but all their thoughts are on each other. I just found that really crappy of both of them and unfair to their partners. I wished there was more at stake, a better root for their love towards each other.. because no matter what, they were infatuated by each other and that doesn't logically result in them spending months thinking and obsessing over each other. Maybe i'm a cynic, but I just can't wrap my head around it. I do have to point out that I love how the relationship between Lucy and her parents got better in a nondramatic way. It was all because of lack of communicating their thoughts and feelings to each other and I liked how they were able to get past that. Basically if you were a fan of Smith's previous two books then this is for you. Also if you don't mind insta-love contemporary books then you would also enjoy this. I did enjoy it, hence the 3 star rating, but it isn't a book that I will remember a couple of months from now.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 13, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    It seems like I waited forever for The Geography of You and Me.

    It seems like I waited forever for The Geography of You and Me. One of my favorite YA contemporaries was written by Jennifer E. Smith – The Statistical Probability of Love at First Sight, if you were wondering – and I love New York City. Of course I wanted to get my hands on this book. After initially being denied access to an ARC, I pre-ordered it and then got wrapped up in other books and didn't get around to it, even though it's been on my iPad this whole time. Then it was made available on NetGalley again and I was lucky enough to snag a review copy and I figured there's no time like the present to read it. 

    This book had a great setup and was, initially at least, set in the best city in the whole world. The first 25%-30% was fantastic. I loved Lucy and Owen introduction and the time they spent together the night of the blackout. I loved the author's description of the city during the blackout. I don't ever want to experience something like it firsthand, but thanks to Jennifer's descriptive writing, I felt like I was right there with them. Things started to go a bit awry for me once the characters went on their own journeys, but not because the story failed at that point, but just because I'm a sucker for romance and I wanted more. That was my only real problem with the book – the lack of MORE. More of Lucy and Owen together. More banter. More romance. More New York. More everything. Except travel. It definitely had enough of that. 

    Now I'm going to slightly contradict myself and say that, while I wanted more of Lucy and Owen in the same zip code, I loved how realistically Jennifer handled their time apart. The postcards were sweet and unexpected of teens these days. They weren't about the instant gratification of social media or email, but something deeper. They didn't wait around for each other – at least not completely. They each had relationships with someone else and, while that bothered me at the time because I was shipping Lucy and Owen, it was believable. These two had no idea if or when they would ever see each other again. It only makes sense they would try to recapture some of what they felt together with new people. I can't really fault them for it. I think it would have been easier for Jennifer to write a story where they sat and pined away for each other and didn't date anyone else. But it wouldn't have been as real, either. 

    I've seen some other reviews slamming the author's writing in some of the later chapters in the book. Personally, I enjoyed these chapters. They were some of my favorite moments in the entire book. I loved seeing the parallel in their lives in each new city they were in. There was a huge focus on waiting in this book and it was illustrated perfectly for me in these chapters. 

    In a nutshell, I *liked* The Geography of You and Me. It was better than the last of Jennifer's books that I read – This is What Happy Looks Like – but nowhere close to as good as The Statistical Probability of Love at First Sight, IMHO anyhow. The pace was slower than most YA contemporaries I read and at times I found my attention wavering a bit, but then I would get pulled back in with an event or turn of phrase. But mostly, I just really wanted to see what would happen in the end. This book wasn't as big on swoons as I hoped it would be, but I was able to appreciate it for what it was. 

    I received a copy of this book from the publisher, via NetGalley, in exchange for an honest review.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 7, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    This may only be my second book by Jennifer E. Smith, but I feel

    This may only be my second book by Jennifer E. Smith, but I feel like I've got a pretty good idea of what one should expect when reading a book by her. If you're looking for cutesy, romantic(ish), fluffy, feel good stories then Jennifer E. Smith has the book(s) for you! I'm not author/book bashing by any means. She's found her niche and she writes it well. I just don't think one should expect anything with more than a little depth from any of her books.

    The Geography of You and Me was a sweet (if clichéd), quick read. It would have been nearly perfect if I had wanted something fluffy and light. I was just expecting something more. I expected more postcards, e-mails, and just more interaction between Lucy and Owen in general.

    * This book was received from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. *

    You can read all of my reviews on my blog, KDH Reviews.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 31, 2014

    Great book

    Great book read it in a couple hours but the ending could have been better

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 16, 2014

    I thought it was a masterpiece of writing. Lyrical, engaging, im

    I thought it was a masterpiece of writing. Lyrical, engaging, imaginative. And heartwarming. 

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 13, 2014

    Owen and Lucy meet when they get stuck in an elevator together.

    Owen and Lucy meet when they get stuck in an elevator together. The power in New York City goes out and they spend an entire night together, watching the stars. Soon, both of them are pulled away from New York with their families, but they keep in touch sporadically and meet up now and then. It is a slow paced, gentle romance that reminds me of the way romance novels used to be. Sweet, genuine, and real.

    The only problem with it is that I've read several other books that are very similar. But it's nearly impossible to write something that's unlike anything else, so it's not really a complaint. The book is clean, sweet, and it's the way romance is supposed to be. It's about building a relationship and getting to know someone. I really liked it!

    Content: About 3-4 mild curse words.

    Source: I received a digital galley of this book in exchange for an honest review.

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  • Posted August 29, 2014

    4.5/5 stars. The Geography of You and Me appealed to me because

    4.5/5 stars.

    The Geography of You and Me appealed to me because a) it’s written by Jennifer E. Smith who is amazing and b) it was about traveling; I have always had this need to travel, whether it’s around my extremely large state or around the world, I just want to see everything that I can. I thought it would be fun to change up my review style a bit today. Since this book focuses on geography and traveling, I decided to list five reasons why I think that traveling is important and use those points as a platform to discuss the book. Every reason will also have a quote because Jennifer E. Smith is just a master of words. 

    “That was the thing about books, she was realizing; they could take you somewhere else entirely, it was true. But it wasn’t the same thing as actually going there yourself.”

    1. Traveling can create long-lasting relationships. Lucy and Owen actually met while they were both living in New York City but it was only a matter of days before they both left the Big Apple for different destinations. Their separate travels solidified their relationship into something that lasted, much longer than the one (innocent) night that they spent together. No matter how many new people they each met, or how long it was since they had corresponded, they could never forget about each other. I love how their understanding of people and relationships grew and changed throughout the book because of the people that they met and observed while apart. Owen talked about how some of the people he met were like light bulbs, the connection being instant and easy but somehow artificial while his relationship with Lucy was like a fire, slow but long lasting. Man, that’s brilliant. Bravo Jennifer E. Smith, bravo.

    “If you were to draw a map of the two of them, of where they started out and where they would both end up, the lines would be shooting away from each other like magnets spun around on their poles. And it occurred to Owen that there was something deeply flawed about this, that there should be circles or angles or turns, anything that might make it possible for the two lines to meet again. Instead, they were both headed in the exact opposite directions. The map was as good as a door swinging shut. And the geography of the thing—the geography of them—was completely and hopelessly wrong.”

    I’ll just give you a moment to recover from that beautiful writing. 

    2. Traveling is a way for us to find ourselves. A major theme in the book is emotional geography, being geographically near someone but feeling alone or in the case of Lucy and Owen, being geographically distant but being emotionally close. By the end, Lucy and Owen are not exactly the same people we met at the beginning. Their travels allowed them to find themselves; Lucy found herself while traveling a different continent while Owen found himself on his journey from city to city. It doesn’t matter where you travel, just go. I could have easily watched this as a movie because it is that realistic and compelling; the characters were flawed but we got a chance to understand their motives and really see how their travels changed and affected them. 

    “Standing there alone in the hallway, she couldn’t help smiling. For the first time in her life, she realized there was no hope of blending in. Here, she was the one who was different. She was the one with the accent. The new girl. The object of curiosity. And to her surprise, she found that she didn’t mind.”

    3. Traveling changes you. The quote explains it all. 

    “All these years, she’d imagined her parents were out there in the world trying to take in as much as possible: photos and stories and memories, check marks on a list of countries and pins on a globe. But what she hadn’t understood until now was that they’d left pieces of themselves in all those places, too. They’d made a little home for themselves wherever they went, and now Lucy would do the same.”

    4. Traveling teaches you to appreciate the little moments in life. Lucy and Owen spent one night together that changed their lives. Throughout the book, they keep reliving conversations that were had and emotions that were felt in the short time that they had spent together. A night that should have been dreadful, the night of the blackout, ended up being wonderful and brought them together; it taught them both to find beauty in unexpected places and to really enjoy all of life’s little treasures.

    “How long could a single night really be expected to last? How far could you stretch such a small collection of minutes? He was just a boy on a roof. She was just a girl in an elevator.”

    5. Traveling teaches you about love. I had to go there. One of my favorite scenes is when Lucy is observing an old man who is desperately in love with his wife. We get to see Lucy be the student and begin to really understand what love is from this man. The swoon in this book…. It was some swoony swoon. 

    “There was a lump in her throat as she watched him fidget with the buttons on his vest, and it struck her as the truest form of kindness, the most basic sort of love: to be worried about the one who was worrying about you.” 

    “They just stood there, regarding each other silently, the room suddenly as quiet as the elevator had been, as comfortable as the kitchen floor, as remote as the roof. Because that's what happened when you were with someone like that: the world shrank to just the right size. It molded itself to fit only the two of you, and nothing more.” 

    To wrap it up, I loved this novel because I love Jennifer E. Smith’s mind and words; she amazes me with every book. She perfectly captured the beauty in traveling the world and beauty that can be found in everyday life if you only look for it. This book has it all: swoon, compelling characters, mistakes, happiness, and most of all, geography. 

    My favorite quote: “Something like that," he said, his eyes shining, and she realized just how much there was she didn't know about him. He was like one of her novels, still unfinished and best understood in the right place and at the right time. She couldn't wait to read the rest.”

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  • Posted July 31, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    Sweet Teen Romance I received an advance reader edition of this

    Sweet Teen Romance

    I received an advance reader edition of this book from Little, Brown Books for Young Readers and Net Galley for the purpose of providing an honest review.

    3.5 Stars

    I read books in all kinds of situations and I read lots of different kinds of books. This book was read from beginning to end while sitting in the car for a long car ride. I only mention that fact because it is a very different reading environment for me. I am not sure if I would have put it down to do something else around the house because it simply was not an option. That being said I have done my best to rate this book as I would any other book.

    I enjoyed this sweet teen read. Some portions of the book were more interesting than others and in many ways I found the basic plot to be unrealistic but I like the book anyway. This is the first book that I have read by Jennifer E. Smith.

    Lucy and Owen meet in a New York City apartment building's elevator. Unfortunately, they meet during a huge blackout affecting the entire area. After being rescued from the elevator, they stay together throughout the night. Lucy is the youngest daughter of a wealthy couple who enjoy traveling and she is home alone on the night of the blackout. Owen is the only child of the apartment's superintendent. Their evening together makes a lasting impression on both Lucy and Owen.

    Lucy soon moves with her parents to Scotland while Owen travels west with his father who is looking for work. Each adjust to their new life while staying connected via postcards and email. This really is the story of Lucy and the story of Owen told in alternating narratives. Their stories are really separate with the exception of a few places where their paths intersect.

    The book was easy to read. I found the alternating viewpoints worked in this book but I found that I enjoyed Owen's voice more than Lucy's for much of the book. It could be that Owen's story was simply more interesting to me since he had much more to overcome. I do think that it is a bit unrealistic that both Owen and Lucy would still be thinking about each other so much after that one night. I have been a teenager and I am the mother of two teenage daughters. I am constantly around teenagers and as far as I can tell most teenagers move on to the next thing very quickly. That is just my opinion. I do understand that Lucy and Owen did not have a network of friends to move on with since they both move during the book.

    I did like this book. I would feel completely comfortable with my youngest daughter who is 13 reading this book so I do feel it is appropriate for younger teens. I plan to read other works by Jennifer E. Smith in the future.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 31, 2014

    :)

    :)

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  • Posted July 21, 2014

      This is my first book from Smith and it sounded super cute so

     
    This is my first book from Smith and it sounded super cute so I took a chance. It starts of with Lucy and Owen meeting while stuck in an elevator. Lucy is a city girl and Owen is new to New York. Spending the night together walking around after they were rescued gave them the time to get to know each other fall for each other. The future is unclear, and when they are separated but with the connection they feel for each other, they try to keep in touch. Sounds cute and fun right?!
     
    Lucy and Owen are wonderful characters. They each have their own things that have happened in their lives, things to move on from and move past. Told in dual POV’s we get both sides and their struggles and feelings about things. The romance had it share of swoony moments. It was sweet, with the postcards and emails but the pair being separated for over 3/4′s of the book eventually got to me. The hopeless romantic side of me wanted them to see each other again, and I kept waiting for it to happen. Wanting to know what was going to happen, would they meet again, would they work through their own issues and insecurities? Some of the decisions made by both of them were good ones, but I liked watching grow and learn more about themselves. The descriptions of the places traveled were great too ! The ending was pretty good and overall, this was quite an enjoyable read and I will be on the lookout for more books from this author.

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  • Posted June 22, 2014

    I love the premise of this book. I love these types of YA storie

    I love the premise of this book. I love these types of YA stories. However, after 15%, I lost my connection to the main characters.  I preferred them just to be apart.  There was nothing wrong with the writing.  For me it was the way the characters were presented.
    Lucy and Owen meet in an elevator during a New York blackout. They spend a few days together, only later to be separated.  Owen moves to the West Coast while Lucy moves across the Atlantic.  They try to keep in touch by sending each other postcards from whatever destination they live or travel.  On few rare occasions they meet up.  The reader gets to see them through a span of several years.
    The ending just did nothing for me.  It did not feel like closer. It just felt like a continuation.  Like what happened in the last 35% of the book was just going to keep happening.
    I did not feel any sparks, I honestly did not see the story of “them.”  It just felt like a bunch of inner dialogue about two people and where they lived at any given time. I almost wanted them to be with other people.   There was nothing special about any of their interaction except in the beginning.  I felt like every time Owen thought about sending Lucy a postcard it was not that he wanted to but he felt like he did it out of obligation.  
    A copy was provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

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  • Posted June 4, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    Young Love for the Romantics at Heart!

    Unlikely pairs seem to make for the best stories and The Geography of You and Me proves that even teens can forge the most amazing, soul deep bonds. Imagine being trapped in an elevator with a teen boy you don’t even know, but together, you begin a relationship that stands the test of time, distance and differences. Lucy and Owen come from two different worlds, but that day in the elevator brought those worlds together as they continued to spend hours after the power returns just talking, getting to know each other.
    Lucy and Owen go their separate ways, leaving New York behind, Lucy to another continent, and Owen across the country. Through postcards, they maintain the tenuous hold on their bond, even as time goes by. As the miles split their lives in two, so splits this tale as each of their perspectives are told. Will what they feel stand the test of time, growing up and the miles in between or will they grow apart, each becoming a fond memory to cherish in later years?
    Jennifer E. Smith has created a youthful love story that grows gently and warms the heart to read. On the light side, with the pacing of a skilled hand, The Geography of You and Me is a delightful read that will leave you smiling, inside and out as two teens learn the value of the work it takes to keep love and friendship alive.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 5, 2014

    fantastic

    fantastic

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  • Posted April 20, 2014

    I've been wanting to read a Jennifer E. Smith book for some time

    I've been wanting to read a Jennifer E. Smith book for some time now, as I've heard she writes really cute contemporaries and I am all about those! While this was a cute read, I found it just didn't quite have that special something I was looking for.

    Pacing: I felt the pacing was okay. Smith is a very descriptive author and I felt it was a bit overkill for my tastes. I also felt the overall action of the plot was lacking. While I enjoyed the description to an extent, I just didn't feel a good balance between the two.

    Storyline: I thought the premise was a cute one- two people meeting under a rather unique circumstance and spending time together, only to be separated shortly after and having to overcome that obstacle. I felt the blurb of this was a bit misleading. I was waiting for this epic romance that would defy time and space and I just didn't get that. I thought Owen and Lucy would have an actual relationship and spend their time writing back and forth and actually pining for one another. Don't get me wrong- I like that Smith went in a realistic direction in terms of both of them meeting other people, but I don't feel Owen and Lucy's relationship was emphasized nearly enough. In fact, they really seem more like two passing ships in the night, than two people who shared a connection together at one point in time. Owen is resistant to responding back to her via email, which I didn't really understand, and only sends her postcards, which, while charming, was frustrating because they were usually silly inside jokes and didn't have any depth to them. I think one of my problems was that I went into this book looking for a cute romance and ended up getting more realism than I had planned.

    Characters: I didn't really find myself connecting to these characters to be honest. I felt bad for Lucy, as she essentially takes care of herself at 16. Her brothers are off at college and her parents gallivant around the world, leaving her at home. This bothers her, as she would also like to go see these places, and she finds herself lonely a lot of the time. She isn't a social butterfly and doesn't have very many friends of her own. Spending one night with Owen and sharing her love of NYC with him really made her feel special and definitely not so lonely. Her feelings for Owen seemed like they ran a little deeper than his for her, as he would cross her mind more often while she was away.

    Where Lucy loves the city, Owen does not. He is having a hard time adjusting to his new life there and he and his father are still grieving over the loss of his mother. While Lucy moves away internationally, Owen and his father jump in the car and travel across the country trying to find their place. Sadly, each place doesn't seem to last very long before they're back on the road again.

    I did have a hard time understanding why Lucy and Owen's next meeting was so awkward when they were at the restaurant in San Francisco. I get they were nervous, but wow they took it to a whole other level. They were much more comfortable outside, where I guess they didn't feel restrained in any way? Just the freedom of being outdoors in a vast world makes the conversation flow, maybe? My biggest issue I think was that I just didn't really get Lucy and Owen's relationship. I didn't see them develop into friends and when they met up again, it still felt distant and off. It wasn't until the end where I really started to see their feelings evolve and mature and that their 'relationship' made more sense.

    Final Thoughts: I did really like the whole 'home isn't necessarily a place' aspect the book had. Lucy and Owen both realize that it's not necessarily about the place they end up, but who is there waiting. Overall, it was cute, but I just needed more. I had a hard time believing in their relationship, because I didn't feel they really had one for most of the story. They shared a connection one night and then went their own ways, only thinking of one another occasionally. The ending was sweet, so fans of Jennifer's writing style and light-hearted nature will be very pleased.

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  • Posted April 15, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    What I liked: The cover is super cute and coordinates well with

    What I liked: The cover is super cute and coordinates well with Smith's previous books despite being stand alones. I always enjoy a dual POV and unique circumstances that bring two people together. Lucy and Owen are both likeable characters and it was interesting to watch their long-distance relationship play out around the globe. One of the things Jennifer E. Smith does well is weaving together light-hearted romance with somber issues in a way that feels neither too fluffy nor too heavy. And she always gives readers an ending they can be happy with.

    What Left Me Wanting More: While I enjoyed this story, I wanted it to suck me in more than it did. I wanted to have that, "unputdownable" feeling and I didn't.

    Final Verdict: The perfect escape for those looking for a feel good romance.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 18, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 28, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

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