The Geomancer's Compass

The Geomancer's Compass

by Melissa Hardy
     
 

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This futuristic novel has all the elements YA fiction needs to draw critical attention from reviewers, and to elicit award-nominations. It is thematically interesting, culturally diverse, well-written, futuristic, and very funny.
 
Set in the year 2021, this fantastic YA novel explores the tension between a young woman's future building infrastructure

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Overview

This futuristic novel has all the elements YA fiction needs to draw critical attention from reviewers, and to elicit award-nominations. It is thematically interesting, culturally diverse, well-written, futuristic, and very funny.
 
Set in the year 2021, this fantastic YA novel explores the tension between a young woman's future building infrastructure for Augmented Reality, and the commitment she makes to her dying grandmother to honour ancient Chinese magic. The Geomancer's Compass imagines a world in the near future while exploring the Chinese immigrant experience and the expanding, elastic and shifting nature of reality.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“…The Geomancer's Compass will do well among middle grade aged readers, especially those interested in mystery and early Canadian history and Chinese culture themed novels…. Hardy has crafted a well-thought-out tale, one which is equally engaging as it is enlightening.”
— Recommended, CM Magazine
 
“Miranda Lu is a sixteen-year-old computer geek in 2021, when virtual reality is a completely immersive experience. It’s also a platform that can be accessed by the spirit of her dead great-great-grandfather, who sends Miranda and her cousin Brian on a mission to break the family curse. The curse’s origins in Chinese tradition make this a thoughtful as well as exciting read for the younger set.”
The DC Spotlight Newspaper

Kirkus Reviews
Chinese-Canadian cousins must lay to rest the hungry ghost of an improperly buried ancestor in this debut for teens set in the very near future. The Lius are cursed: Miranda's father has never really recovered from an unlucky lightning strike, her brothers are plagued with asthma and encroaching blindness, and her cousins are, respectively, dyslexic to the point of illiterate with a side of ADHD, agoraphobic and anorexic. But narrator Miranda, the normal one (aside from crippling anxiety about any number of things), has a breezy tone even when relaying terrible things, thanks to her boundless self-obsession. After The Grandfather dies, Miranda and Brian (dyslexic) are sent on a journey to recover the bones of The Grandfather's twin brother, killed a century ago. Due to bad feng shui, he is not at rest, which is the reason for the family's misfortunes. Conveniently, The Grandfather can take avatar form and appear in a virtual reality, accessible via I-Spex, to guide Miranda and Brian and fight Qianfu's ghost. Indeed, The Grandfather and convenient technology (the virtual Google Maps–like system includes the ability to see underground, right when Miranda and Brian need to pinpoint the dead body) are the stars of this somewhat belabored and uneven but earnest novel. Notable for originality but limited by forced writing and shallow characters. (Science fiction. 11-14)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781770492929
Publisher:
Tundra
Publication date:
11/13/2012
Pages:
272
Product dimensions:
5.58(w) x 7.74(h) x 0.94(d)
Age Range:
12 Years

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher

“…The Geomancer's Compass will do well among middle grade aged readers, especially those interested in mystery and early Canadian history and Chinese culture themed novels…. Hardy has crafted a well-thought-out tale, one which is equally engaging as it is enlightening.”
— Recommended, CM Magazine
 
“Miranda Lu is a sixteen-year-old computer geek in 2021, when virtual reality is a completely immersive experience. It’s also a platform that can be accessed by the spirit of her dead great-great-grandfather, who sends Miranda and her cousin Brian on a mission to break the family curse. The curse’s origins in Chinese tradition make this a thoughtful as well as exciting read for the younger set.”
The DC Spotlight Newspaper

Meet the Author

Melissa Hardy's first novel was A Cry of Bees, which was published in 1970 when she was just seventeen years old. Since then she has won the Journey Prize for an excerpt from her short story collection Constant Fire and the Canadian Authors Association Jubilee Award for The Uncharted Heart (Knopf Canada). Her writing has appeared in many literary journals and has been twice anthologized in Best American Short Stories and the Year's Best Fantasy and Horror. The Geomancer's Compass marks her debut as an exciting new YA author. Born and raised in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, Melissa Hardy makes her home in Port Stanley, Ontario.

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