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The GF Kid: A Celiac Disease Survival Guide
     

The GF Kid: A Celiac Disease Survival Guide

by Melissa London, Eric Glickman (Illustrator)
 
"I'm no different than any other kid. I'm just a GF kid," says Paris, matter-of-factly. She's the spunky eleven-year-old narrator of this story for kids with celiac disease who must eat gluten-free (GF) foods. With equal parts humor and directness, Paris* gets right down to business explaining what it's like to have celiac disease. (*Paris's mom wrote the story,

Overview

"I'm no different than any other kid. I'm just a GF kid," says Paris, matter-of-factly. She's the spunky eleven-year-old narrator of this story for kids with celiac disease who must eat gluten-free (GF) foods. With equal parts humor and directness, Paris* gets right down to business explaining what it's like to have celiac disease. (*Paris's mom wrote the story, full of her daughter's wisecracking comments, and her dad drew the funny, cartoony illustrations.)

Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder that affects 1 in 250 kids. If you have celiac disease, you cannot tolerate gluten, a substance found in many foods, including--gulp!--cake, cookies, pasta, or pizza. Don't sweat it. Paris has creative GF solutions for you. She offers tips on what to bring to school, parties, and sleep-overs; where to shop for GF foods at stores and online; and how to choose from among plenty of foods that don't contain gluten, like bananas, yogurt, popcorn, chocolate pudding cups, hamburgers, soda, and more! Paris explains that you don't have to worry about your friends either. They'll get on board once they understand that eating even a tiny bit of gluten can make you sick, tired, or slow your growth.

In THE GF KID, you'll find everything you need to know to get on with your gluten-free life, including:

What celiac disease is and how you can manage it
How to choose safe, gluten-free foods and what to avoid
Lists of gluten-free foods (and candy!)
Tips for eating away from home (restaurants, school, friends' homes, the movies)
Keeping your gluten-free stuff separate from gluteny stuff
Favorite GF recipes

If you're the parent of a preteen or youngteen with celiac disease-whether your child is newly diagnosed or has been living with celiac disease for a while-you'll want to have this friendly and empowering book for your child. It's also a great read for friends, neighbors, classmates, and teachers who want to be supportive and help your son or daughter be a GF kid.

For a kid's GF t-shirt, based on the book's illustrations, contact the publisher.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
A book of this sort could come across as very dry; that is not the case in this well handled, lively, spirited look at coping with a serious disease. The cartoon drawings are humorous and appealing—child friendly but not insulting. The character of Paris, an eleven-year-old girl with celiac disease, is clever and cute enough to keep this information-packed book one that children will enjoy while learning about how to deal with this disease that affects 1 in every 133 people. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disease, not an allergy, which causes the production of antibodies to fight the perceived "poison" that gluten represents to the body. The antibodies attack the body itself because there is not any poison actually present. This attack manifests itself in a wide variety of symptoms, making it difficult to diagnose the disease, leaving many people undiagnosed or inaccurately diagnosed. The story line is based on the author and illustrator's own daughter's experience with having the disease diagnosed and being "treated" with a gluten free diet. This book will give lots of help to families who must eliminate gluten for a family member who needs to dramatically improve their health. There is basic information about the kinds of foods that are gluten free and those which are not, but there is also an abundance of back matter including website addresses, references, books, recipes, sources for purchasing gluten free foods, support groups, summer camps, and strategies for traveling, going to restaurants, as well as "sleep over parties." Paris' willingness to be so open about her own situation will be an inspiration to others with celiac disease. This will be an excellent resource fordoctor's offices, libraries, and parents—but most especially the child (actually any age) learning to eat healthy and GF (gluten free) for life. 2005, Woodbine House, Ages 9 to 12.
—Sheilah Egan
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
Gr 3-5-London and Glickman have teamed up to produce a book about their eldest daughter, recently diagnosed with celiac disease. Black-and-white cartoon drawings of Paris, an active 11-year-old, lead readers through facts about the disease, how it affects those who have it, and what can be done to live healthfully in spite of it. In addition to describing the physical effects of gluten on the body, London does an excellent job of exploring the emotional effects of living without it. Gluten is found in most grains; people with the disease cannot eat pizza, grilled-cheese sandwiches, or chicken nuggets. As Paris says, "Sometimes it makes me sad....Some kids have way, way, way bigger problems!!! Sometimes I just need to remind myself of that!" While this book may not have universal appeal, it is an informative choice for children who have recently been diagnosed with celiac disease.-Wendy Smith-D'Arezzo, Loyola College, Baltimore, MD Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781890627690
Publisher:
Woodbine House
Publication date:
11/28/2005
Pages:
64
Product dimensions:
8.26(w) x 9.96(h) x 0.23(d)
Age Range:
8 - 12 Years

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