The Gingerbread Kid Goes to School [NOOK Book]

Overview

A silly twist on the classic tale. The school principal bakes a gingerbread cookie and brings it to school in his lunchbox. When the principal opens his lunchbox, the gingerbread kid winks and jumps off the desk. Where is he off to in such a hurry?

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NOOK Book (NOOK Kids Read to Me)
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Overview

A silly twist on the classic tale. The school principal bakes a gingerbread cookie and brings it to school in his lunchbox. When the principal opens his lunchbox, the gingerbread kid winks and jumps off the desk. Where is he off to in such a hurry?

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
The familiar story is given a slightly different twist here. The principal bakes a gingerbread kid and when he puts in the candy eyes, the kid flips off the desk and heads out on his own. The principal joins the chase and the kid shouts the well known refrain "I'm the gingerbread kid. I'm fast as can be. You can run, run, run. But you can't catch me!" He disturbs the gym class, lunchroom, teachers in the hall and has quite an entourage pursuing him. When he reaches the library, the young boy seems quite indifferent, but he does catch the gingerbread kid, who once again turns into a cookie and is not eaten by the boy, but by his very smart dog who just happened to be waiting outside the open window. It is this ending that is illogical and improbable. The last scene shows a snowy scene, so why would the window be open and why would the dog be waiting there in the cold school ground instead of being warm and cozy at home? Young kids probably won't care, but the original story holds together better. Part of the "All Aboard Reading" series Station Stop (level 1). 2002, Grosset & Dunlap,
— Marilyn Courtot
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780698164673
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA)
  • Publication date: 7/22/2002
  • Series: Penguin Young Readers Level 2 Series
  • Sold by: Penguin Group
  • Format: NOOK Kids Read to Me
  • Pages: 32
  • Sales rank: 409,547
  • Age range: 6 - 7 Years
  • File size: 47 MB
  • Note: This product may take a few minutes to download.

Meet the Author

Joan Holub
The reason I'm a children's book author/illustrator today is that I have a lot of determination. I practiced drawing and revised my stories over and over because I wanted nothing more than to do what I'm doing now--writing and illustrating children's books.



I always knew I'd become an artist and studied art in college in Texas. After graduating from college, I became an Art Director at a graphic design firm. I moved from Texas to New York to work in children's publishing. I got a job as Associate Art Director in children's books at Scholastic, where I designed books and enjoyed working with editors and illustrators. This was excellent experience.



I illustrated my first children's book in 1992 and soon began illustrating full time. I had always written stories, but I began completing manuscripts and mailing them out to publishers in the early 1990's. In 1996, I sold my first two manuscripts -- Boo Who? (Scholastic) and Pen Pals (Grosset & Dunlap) -- both published in 1997.



Now I write and illustrate full time. It is a great job. When I think of a idea, I write it down so that whenever I finish one story I'll have a bunch of ideas waiting that I can begin working on next. I especially love reading and writing funny stories, weird stories, and animal stories.



Books I've written and illustrated include:


Cinderdog and the Wicked Stepcat Albert Whitman, 2001 (ages 4-8, picture book)

Abby Cadabra, Super Speller, Grosset & Dunlap, 2000 (ages 6-8, easy reader)

How to Find Lost Treasure in All Fifty States and Canada, Too Aladdin, 2000 (ages 8-12, NF)

The Haunted States of America Aladdin, 2001 (ages 8-12, NF)

Vincent Van Gogh: Sunflowers and Swirly Stars, 2001 Grosset & Dunlap (ages 6-9, NF)

Happy Monster Day! Scholastic,1999

Pen Pals Grosset & Dunlap, 1997 (ages 6-8, easy reader)

Ivy Green, Cootie Queen Troll, 1998 (ages 7-9)

Red, Yellow, Green What Do Signs Mean? Scholastic, 1998 (ages 4-8)

Boo Who? A Spooky Lift-the-Flap Book Scholastic, 1997 (ages 1-6)

Eek-A-Boo! A Spooky Lift-the-Flap Book Scholastic, 2000 (ages 1-6)



Books I've written include:


I Have A Weird Brother Who Digested A Fly, Albert Whitman, 1999 (picture book)

Light the Candles, A Hanukkah Lift the Flap Book, Puffin, 2000

The Garden That We Grew Viking/Puffin, 2001(ages 4-7, easy reader)

The Pizza That We Made Viking/Puffin, 2001(ages 4-7, easy reader)

Scat Cats! Viking/Puffin, 2001(ages 4-7, easy reader)

Backwards Day, Scholastic, 2000

Why Do Dogs Bark? Puffin, 2001(ages 6-8, easy reader)

Why Do Cats Meow? Puffin, 2001(ages 6-8, easy reader)

The Spooky Sleepover, Grosset & Dunlap, 1999 (ages 6-8, easy reader)

Pajama Party Grosset & Dunlap, 1998 (ages 4-7, easy reader)

Space Dogs on Planet K-9 Troll, 1998 (ages 7-10)



Books I've illustrated include:


Breakout at the Bug Lab Dial, 2001(ages 6-8, easy reader)

Hector's Hiccups Random House, 1999

Shadows Everywhere Scholastic, 1999

Hot Cha-Cha! Winslow Press

No Fair! Scholastic, Hello Math

The 100th Day of School Scholastic

Ten Little Ballerinas Grosset & Dunlap

I Love You Mom Troll

I Love You Dad Troll

My First Book of Sign Language Troll



Answers to questions people sometimes ask me:



1. Where do you get your ideas?


I get ideas many different ways. Sometimes, ideas just pop into my head. I also listen to and watch the people around me for ideas. I read to get ideas. I daydream to get ideas. When I get an idea, I write it down in an idea notebook, so I won't forget it. I think ideas are the easy part of writing. I get lots of ideas for books all the time. Developing them into a book with a beginning, middle and end is the difficult, time-consuming part. The idea is important, but an idea isn't a book until it has been developed into a story that works as a whole from start to finish.



2. When and why did you decide to become an author and artist?


I've been writing and reading stories all of my life. I didn't concentrate on writing children's books until around 1990. In 1991, I began regularly submitting manuscripts to publishers.I began writing because I had story ideas that I thought would make good books. I've always known I would become an artist--ever since kindergarten.



3. Why don't you illustrate all of the books you write?


I haven't had time to illustrate all of the books I write, but I've usually been very happy with the work of the illustrators who have illustrated my books. I wasn't happy with the art in a couple of books, but I don't think it's fair to try and control the artist, so I keep out of the artist's way as much as possible. I continue to illustrate books by other authors as well. I have just as much fun illustrating a book written by someone else as I do illustrating books I write. As long as the story is good, illustrating it is fun.



4. Did you like school when you were a kid?


Most of the time. I got bored during the summer, so I was glad when school started. I loved getting a new lunchbox and choosing what I would wear the first day. But then after about 2 weeks of school, I wished for summer again. I like to read and I made good grades, so school was mostly fun for me.



5. How do you develop your characters and plot?


I've usually already decided on a main charater and 1/4 to 3/4 of a plot before I start writing a story. I just write and work out the rest of the characters and plot as I go along. I have a college art degree, but have no formal training as a writer. I learn the rhythm and structure of stories by reading books and thinking about how they are structured. I also read instructional books about how to write.



6. What is your favorite part about writing? Why?


Getting an idea; finishing a book manuscript; getting an offer from a publisher; and seeing my book in a store are all big thrills. The process of writing is not always fun. But I'm driven to write, and time flies when I'm writing.



7. How hard has it been to get your works published?


It was hard to sell the first manuscript. Then in 1996, I suddenly sold three manuscripts in three months to Grosset & Dunlap and Scholastic.



8. What are your favorite books besides the one(s) you have written?


Spaceship Under the Apple Tree; Martha Speaks; The Giving Tree; A Friend for Dragon; Chrysanthemum; Ruby the Copycat; Marvin Redpost--Is He A Girl?



9. What do you look for in a good book?


Something I think is funny or a feeling I can strongly identify with. A good idea and a memorable plot and characters.



10. Do you have kids or pets? Hobbies?


No kids, but we do have a great cat, who thinks he's our child. For hobbies, I like to hike, bikeride, and read.





























































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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 15, 2008

    My kids love this book

    The gingerbread boy fools the principal, lunch ladies, teachers, and the coach. But he doesn't fool a smart child who enjoys reading. There's a good message here, subtly infused in a cute, action-packed story that engages kids and has a twist ending. My kids especially enjoyed the fact that a child foils the gingerbread kid after the grown-ups are unable to. I think the illustrations by Debbie Palen are wonderful, too.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 17, 2003

    Great school take-off on the old tale

    The principal bakes the gingerbread cookie in this tale. It's great for kids to see a male role model that cooks! The art is bright and attractive. First graders like to see lots of action, so they like the escapades with the art teachers, lunch ladies, gym coaches, etc. The fact that a child outwits the cookie at the surprising end also appeals to kids. This is a wonderful book for the beginning of the school year and also for any cooking activities. I highly recommend it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 31, 2009

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 11, 2009

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