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The Girl With All the Gifts

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Overview


NOT EVERY GIFT IS A BLESSING.

Melanie is a very special girl. Dr Caldwell calls her "our little genius."

Every morning, Melanie waits in her cell to be collected for class. When they come for her, Sergeant keeps his gun pointing at her while two of his people strap her into the wheelchair. She thinks they don't like her. She jokes that she won't bite, but they don't laugh.

...

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Overview


NOT EVERY GIFT IS A BLESSING.

Melanie is a very special girl. Dr Caldwell calls her "our little genius."

Every morning, Melanie waits in her cell to be collected for class. When they come for her, Sergeant keeps his gun pointing at her while two of his people strap her into the wheelchair. She thinks they don't like her. She jokes that she won't bite, but they don't laugh.

The Girl With All the Gifts is a groundbreaking thriller, emotionally charged and gripping from beginning to end.

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  • The Girl with All the Gifts
    The Girl with All the Gifts  

Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble

Ten-year-old Melanie is good-humored and a star student, but she lives in closely guarded lockdown. This partially zombified child has been kept alive as a medical experiment subject after an undead apocalypse laid waste to much of the planet. Early readers of The Girl with All the Gifts have praised it as a horror story with a human touch and as a novel perfectly described on the jacket as a cross between Kazuo Ishiguro and The Walking Dead. To quote the novel itself, "In an age of rust, she comes up as stainless steel." Definitely worth recommending.

Publishers Weekly
04/14/2014
Comics writer Carey (Lucifer) delivers an entertaining take on several well-worn zombie tropes. Years after the requisite zombie apocalypse (this time caused by a mutant strain of an ant-killing fungus, probably the book’s most original touch), scientists in a remote outpost in England are working on a cure by experimenting on a group of zombified children who retain some of their original emotions and cognitive functions. Although Carey piles on the clichés (beyond the apocalypse and the recently trendy intelligent zombies, there are rogue survivalists straight out of The Walking Dead, scientists willing to cross ethical lines, and the ever-silly notion that people would use any term other than “zombies” to refer to the undead), he builds well-constructed characters—particularly Melanie, one of the zombified children, who comes across as cognitively and emotionally different from the other characters, without feeling like an offensive parody of a person with Asperger’s. The requisite action sequences are also well constructed, and the book will appeal to fans of zombie fiction. (June)
From the Publisher
"Original, thrilling and powerful."—The Guardian

"Unique and terrifying."—Booklist

"An instant favorite."—Boing Boing

"A great read that takes hold of you and doesn't let go."—John Ajvide Lindqvist, author of LET THE RIGHT ONE IN

"Heartfelt, remorseless and painfully human...as fresh as it is terrifying. A jewel."—Joss Whedon

"If you only read one novel this year, make sure it's this one, it's amazing."—Martina Cole

"One of the more imaginative and ingenious additions to the dystopian canon."—Kirkus

"...a brilliant work of science fiction, but even people who never read science fiction should absolutely read this one."—io9.com

Kirkus Reviews
2014-04-02
Carey offers a post-apocalyptic tale set in England in a future when most humans are "empty houses where people used to live." Sgt. Parks, Pvt. Gallagher, Miss Justineau and Dr. Caldwell flee an English military camp, a scientific site for the study of "hungries," zombielike creatures who feast on flesh, human or otherwise. These once-humans are essentially "fungal colonies animating human bodies." After junkers—anarchic survivalists—use hungries to breach the camp's elaborate wire fortifications, the four survivors head for Beacon, a giant refuge south of London where uninfected citizens have retreated over the past two decades, bringing along one of the study subjects, 10-year-old Melanie, a second-generation hungry. Like others of her generation, Melanie possesses superhuman strength and a superb intellect, and she can reason and communicate. Dr. Caldwell had planned to dissect Melanie's brain, but Miss Justineau thinks Melanie is capable of empathy and human interaction, which might make her a bridge between humans and hungries. Their philosophical dispute continues in parallel to a survival trek much like the one in McCarthy's On the Road. The four either kill or hide from junkers and hungries (which are animated by noise, movement and human odors). The characters are somewhat clichéd—Parks, rugged veteran with an empathetic core; Gallagher, rube private and perfect victim; Caldwell, coldhearted objectivist ever focused on prying open Melanie's skull. It may be Melanie's role to lead second-generation hungries in a revival of civilization, which in this imaginative, ominous assessment of our world and its fate, offers cold comfort. One of the more imaginative and ingenious additions to the dystopian canon.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780316278157
  • Publisher: Orbit
  • Publication date: 6/10/2014
  • Pages: 416
  • Sales rank: 777
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 8.30 (h) x 1.50 (d)

Meet the Author

M.R. Carey is an established writer of prose fiction and comic books. He has written for both DC and Marvel, including critically acclaimed runs on X-Men and Fantastic Four, Marvel's flagship superhero titles. His creator-owned books regularly appear in the New York Times graphic fiction bestseller list. He also has several previous novels and one Hollywood movie screenplay to his credit.
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Read an Excerpt

The Girl with All the Gifts


By M. R. Carey

Orbit

Copyright © 2014 M. R. Carey
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-0-316-27815-7



CHAPTER 1

Her name is Melanie. It means "the black girl", from an ancient Greek word, but her skin is actually very fair so she thinks maybe it's not such a good name for her. She likes the name Pandora a whole lot, but you don't get to choose. Miss Justineau assigns names from a big list; new children get the top name on the boys' list or the top name on the girls' list, and that, Miss Justineau says, is that.

There haven't been any new children for a long time now. Melanie doesn't know why that is. There used to be lots; every week, or every couple of weeks, voices in the night. Muttered orders, complaints, the occasional curse. A cell door slamming. Then, after a while, usually a month or two, a new face in the classroom–a new boy or girl who hadn't even learned to talk yet. But they got it fast.

Melanie was new herself, once, but that's hard to remember because it was a long time ago. It was before there were any words; there were just things without names, and things without names don't stay in your mind. They fall out, and then they're gone.

Now she's ten years old, and she has skin like a princess in a fairy tale; skin as white as snow. So she knows that when she grows up she'll be beautiful, with princes falling over themselves to climb her tower and rescue her.

Assuming, of course, that she has a tower.

In the meantime, she has the cell, the corridor, the classroom and the shower room.

The cell is small and square. It has a bed, a chair and a table. On the walls, which are painted grey, there are pictures; a big one of the Amazon rainforest and a smaller one of a pussycat drinking from a saucer of milk. Sometimes Sergeant and his people move the children around, so Melanie knows that some of the cells have different pictures in them. She used to have a horse in a meadow and a mountain with snow on the top, which she liked better.

It's Miss Justineau who puts the pictures up. She cuts them out from the stack of old magazines in the classroom, and she sticks them up with bits of blue sticky stuff at the corners. She hoards the blue sticky stuff like a miser in a story. Whenever she takes a picture down, or puts a new one up, she scrapes up every last bit that's stuck to the wall and puts it back on the little round ball of the stuff that she keeps in her desk.

When it's gone, it's gone, Miss Justineau says.

The corridor has twenty doors on the left-hand side and eighteen doors on the right-hand side. Also it has a door at either end. One door is painted red, and it leads to the classroom–so Melanie thinks of that as the classroom end of the corridor. The door at the other end is bare grey steel and it's really, really thick. Where it leads to is a bit harder to say. Once when Melanie was being taken back to her cell, the door was off its hinges, with some men working on it, and she could see how it had all these bolts and sticking-out bits around the edges of it, so when it's closed it would be really hard to open. Past the door, there was a long flight of concrete steps going up and up. She wasn't supposed to see any of that stuff, and Sergeant said, "Little bitch has got way too many eyes on her" as he shoved her chair into her cell and slammed the door shut. But she saw, and she remembers.

She listens, too, and from overheard conversations she has a sense of this place in relation to other places she hasn't ever seen. This place is the block. Outside the block is the base, which is Hotel Echo. Outside the base is region 6, with London thirty miles to the south and then Beacon another forty-four miles further–and nothing else beyond Beacon except the sea. Most of region 6 is clear, but the only thing that keeps it that way is the burn patrols, with their frags and fireballs. This is what the base is for, Melanie is pretty sure. It sends out burn patrols, to clear away the hungries.

The burn patrols have to be really careful, because there are lots of hungries still out there. If they get your scent, they'll follow you for a hundred miles, and when they catch you they'll eat you. Melanie is glad that she lives in the block, behind that big steel door, where she's safe.

Beacon is very different from the base. It's a whole great big city full of people, with buildings that go up into the sky. It's got the sea on one side of it and moats and minefields on the other three, so the hungries can't get close. In Beacon you can live your whole life without ever seeing a hungry. And it's so big there are probably a hundred billion people there, all living together.

Melanie hopes she'll go to Beacon some day. When the mission is complete, and when (Dr Caldwell said this once) everything gets folded up and put away. Melanie tries to imagine that day; the steel walls closing up like the pages of a book, and then ... something else. Something else outside, into which they'll all go.

It will be scary. But so amazing!

Through the grey steel door each morning Sergeant comes and Sergeant's people come and finally the teacher comes. They walk down the corridor, past Melanie's door, bringing with them the strong, bitter chemical smell that they always have on them; it's not a nice smell, but it's exciting because it means the start of another day's lessons.

At the sound of the bolts sliding and the footsteps, Melanie runs to the door of her cell and stands on tiptoe to peep through the little mesh-screen window in the door and see the people when they go by. She calls out good morning to them, but they're not supposed to answer and usually they don't. Sergeant and his people never do, and neither do Dr Caldwell or Mr Whitaker. And Dr Selkirk goes by really fast and never looks the right way, so Melanie can't see her face. But sometimes Melanie will get a wave from Miss Justineau or a quick, furtive smile from Miss Mailer.

Whoever is going to be the teacher for the day goes straight through into the classroom, while Sergeant's people start to unlock the cell doors. Their job is to take the children to the classroom, and after that they go away again. There's a procedure that they follow, which takes a long time. Melanie thinks it must be the same for all the children, but of course she doesn't know that for sure because it always happens inside the cells and the only cell that Melanie sees the inside of is her own.

To start with, Sergeant bangs on all the doors and shouts at the children to get ready. What he usually shouts is "Transit!" but sometimes he adds more words to that. "Transit, you little bastards!" or "Transit! Let's see you!" His big, scarred face looms up at the mesh window and he glares in at you, making sure you're out of bed and moving.

And one time, Melanie remembers, he made a speech–not to the children but to his people. "Some of you are new. You don't know what the hell you've signed up for, and you don't know where the hell you are. You're scared of these frigging little abortions, right? Well, good. Hug that fear to your mortal soul. The more scared you are, the less chance you'll screw up." Then he shouted, "Transit!" which was lucky because Melanie wasn't sure by then if this was the transit shout or not.

After Sergeant says "Transit", Melanie gets dressed, quickly, in the white shift that hangs on the hook next to her door, a pair of white trousers from the receptacle in the wall, and the white pumps lined up under her bed. Then she sits down in the wheelchair at the foot of her bed, like she's been taught to do. She puts her hands on the arms of the chair and her feet on the footrests. She closes her eyes and waits. She counts while she waits. The highest she's ever had to count is two thousand five hundred and twenty-six; the lowest is one thousand nine hundred and one.

When the key turns in the door, she stops counting and opens her eyes. Sergeant comes in with his gun and points it at her. Then two of Sergeant's people come in and tighten and buckle the straps of the chair around Melanie's wrists and ankles. There's also a strap for her neck; they tighten that one last of all, when her hands and feet are fastened up all the way, and they always do it from behind. The strap is designed so they never have to put their hands in front of Melanie's face. Melanie sometimes says, "I won't bite." She says it as a joke, but Sergeant's people never laugh. Sergeant did once, the first time she said it, but it was a nasty laugh. And then he said, "Like we'd ever give you the chance, sugar plum."

When Melanie is all strapped into the chair, and she can't move her hands or her feet or her head, they wheel her into the classroom and put her at her desk. The teacher might be talking to some of the other children, or writing something on the blackboard, but she (or he, if it's Mr Whitaker, the only teacher who's a he) will usually stop and say, "Good morning, Melanie." That way the children who sit way up at the front of the class will know that Melanie has come into the room and they can say good morning too. Most of them can't see her when she comes in, of course, because they're all in their own chairs with their neck straps fastened up, so they can't turn their heads around that far.

This procedure–the wheeling in, and the teacher saying good morning and then the chorus of greetings from the other kids–happens nine more times, because there are nine children who come into the classroom after Melanie. One of them is Anne, who used to be Melanie's best friend in the class and maybe still is except that the last time they moved the kids around (Sergeant calls it "shuffling the deck") they ended up sitting a long way apart and it's hard to be best friends with someone you can't talk to. Another is Kenny, who Melanie doesn't like because he calls her Melon Brain or M-M-M-Melanie to remind her that she used to stammer sometimes in class.

When all the children are in the classroom, the lessons start. Every day has sums and spelling, and every day has retention tests, but there doesn't seem to be a plan for the rest of the lessons. Some teachers like to read aloud from books and then ask questions about what they just read. Others make the children learn facts and dates and tables and equations, which is something that Melanie is very good at. She knows all the kings and queens of England and when they reigned, and all the cities in the United Kingdom with their areas and populations and the rivers that run through them (if they have rivers) and their mottoes (if they have mottoes). She also knows the capitals of Europe and their populations and the years when they were at war with Britain, which most of them were at one time or another.

She doesn't find it hard to remember this stuff; she does it to keep from being bored, because being bored is worse than almost anything. If she knows surface area and total population, she can work out mean population density in her head and then do regression analyses to guess how many people there might be in ten, twenty, thirty years' time.

But there's sort of a problem with that. Melanie learned the stuff about the cities of the United Kingdom from Mr Whitaker's lessons, and she's not sure if she's got all the details right. Because one day, when Mr Whitaker was acting kind of funny and his voice was all slippery and fuzzy, he said something that worried Melanie. She was asking him whether 1,036,900 was the population of the whole of Birmingham with all its suburbs or just the central metropolitan area, and he said, "Who cares? None of this stuff matters any more. I just gave it to you because all the textbooks we've got are thirty years old."

Melanie persisted, because she knew that Birmingham is the biggest city in England after London, and she wanted to be sure she had the numbers exactly right. "But the census figures from—" she said.

Mr Whitaker cut her off. "Jesus, Melanie, it's irrelevant. It's ancient history! There's nothing out there any more. Not a damn thing. The population of Birmingham is zero."

So it's possible, even quite likely, that some of Melanie's lists need to be updated in some respects.

The children have lessons on Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday. On Saturday, they stay locked in their rooms all day and music plays over the PA system. Nobody comes, not even Sergeant, and the music is too loud to talk over. Melanie had the idea long ago of making up a language that used signs instead of words, so the children could talk to each other through their little mesh windows, and she went ahead and made the language up, which was fun to do, but when she asked Miss Justineau if she could teach it to the class, Miss Justineau told her no, really loud and sharp. She made Melanie promise not to mention her sign language to any of the other teachers, and especially not to Sergeant. "He's paranoid enough already," she said. "If he thinks you're talking behind his back, he'll lose what's left of his mind."

So Melanie never got to teach the other children how to talk in sign language.

Saturdays are long and dull, and hard to get through. Melanie tells herself aloud some of the stories that the children have been told in class, or sings mathematical proofs like the proof for the infinity of prime numbers, in time to the music. It's okay to do this out loud because the music hides her voice. Otherwise Sergeant would come in and tell her to stop.

Melanie knows that Sergeant is still there on Saturdays, because one Saturday when Ronnie hit her hand against the mesh window of her cell until it bled and got all mashed up, Sergeant came in. He brought two of his people, and all three of them were dressed in the big suits that hide their faces, and they went into Ronnie's cell and Melanie guessed from the sounds that they were trying to tie Ronnie into her chair. She also guessed from the sounds that Ronnie was struggling and making it hard for them, because she kept shouting and saying, "Leave me alone! Leave me alone!" Then there was a banging sound that went on and on while one of Sergeant's people shouted, "Christ Jesus, don't—" and then other people were shouting too, and someone said, "Grab her other arm! Hold her!" and then it all went quiet again.

Melanie couldn't tell what happened after that. The people who work for Sergeant went around and locked all the little screens over the mesh windows, so the children couldn't see out. They stayed locked all day. The next Monday, Ronnie wasn't in the class any more, and nobody seemed to know what had happened to her. Melanie likes to think there's another classroom somewhere else on the base, and Ronnie went there, so she might come back one day when Sergeant shuffles the deck again. But what she really believes, when she can't stop herself from thinking about it, is that Sergeant took Ronnie away to punish her for being bad, and he won't let her see any of the other children ever again.

Sundays are like Saturdays except for chow time and the shower. At the start of the day the children are put in their chairs as though it's a regular school day, but with just their right hands and forearms unstrapped. They're wheeled into the shower room, which is the last door on the right, just before the bare steel door.

In the shower room, which is white-tiled and empty, the children sit and wait until everybody has been wheeled in. Then Sergeant's people bring chow bowls and spoons. They put a bowl on each child's lap, the spoon already sticking into it.

In the bowl there are about a million grubs, all squirming and wriggling over each other.

The children eat.

In the stories that they read, children sometimes eat other things–cakes and chocolate and bangers and mash and crisps and sweets and spaghetti and meatballs. The children only eat grubs, and only once a week, because–as Dr Selkirk explains one time when Melanie asks–their bodies are spectacularly efficient at metabolising proteins. They don't have to have any of those other things, not even water to drink. The grubs give them everything they need.


(Continues...)

Excerpted from The Girl with All the Gifts by M. R. Carey. Copyright © 2014 M. R. Carey. Excerpted by permission of Orbit.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 36 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(22)

4 Star

(8)

3 Star

(3)

2 Star

(2)

1 Star

(1)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 36 Customer Reviews
  • Posted June 19, 2014

    I admit I read a couple of reviews of this book before I began r

    I admit I read a couple of reviews of this book before I began reading it myself. The reviews were fabulous and hinted there was a big secret that shouldn't be spoiled by reviews that might give it away, so I immediately stopped, anticipating a mind-blowing twist in this novel. About ten pages in, I figured it out and assumed since it was that easy, there must be something else. But there wasn't.

    Without giving anything away, this book is about a topic that's pretty popular right now, but is explained in scientific terms that made complete sense and I liked that. Although the story was told in varying POV's, I especially enjoyed learning how Melanie perceived her world and had to make decisions far beyond her years. I also found it fascinating being in loathsome Dr. Caldwell's head to understand how she justified her actions. The relationship between Melanie and Sergent Parks was fascinating, and even touching at times as it evolved, although the primary focus was meant to be on the interaction between Miss Justineau and Melanie. I thought Parks was more of a realist, while Miss Justineau occasionally refused to see logic, although I really admired her spunk.

    While this book had several 'rush of adrenaline' moments, adequate pacing, and kept my interest, I thought the title, and even the cover were misleading and probably missing this novel's target audience. On the other hand, those who were misled but stick with it may be surprised at how much they enjoy this book.

    I would recommend The Girl With All the Gifts to sci-fi, horror, and dystopian readers - it was a different take on a subject that's been around for quite some time and was an engaging read.

    This review is based on a digital ARC from the publisher through NetGalley.

    10 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 27, 2014

    It was a good read

    This book is pretty good, very descriptive, and it gets you wondering what will happen next. I personaly couldnt put it down so it only took me about 45 mins for me to read it. So yeah it was good

    4 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 27, 2014

    New take on an old genre

    I thoroughly enjoyed this book. The beginning really pulled me in and I found the whole story satisfying. The characters are well written. I liked how the reader was able to get into their minds to find out what made them tick. I also enjoyed the writing itself. It is well written, easy to follow and hard to put down.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 10, 2014

    I received this book free from Net Galley and Orbit in exchange

    I received this book free from Net Galley and Orbit in exchange for an honest review. Thank you both for the opportunity!!

    This book was nothing like I thought it was going to be and after a little ways into, I realized it was another Zombie book.
    Ugh, love watching  The Walking Dead, but don't like reading Zombie books. 

    However, this one had a much different take on the genre and I found myself really getting into it. I really felt for the main
    character, Melanie, and enjoyed rallying her on. And, of course, there was the villain who everyone loves to hate. 

    The book was an easy read and I did so in two sittings, only because I had to stop for an engagement.
    It was very well written and I would recommend it to anyone that likes the dystopian genre.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 10, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    I thought it was brilliant. The character of Melanie was so real

    I thought it was brilliant. The character of Melanie was so real, and the journey was riveting. But it was the ending I adore. Never saw it coming, but afterward, couldn't imagine any other way of finishing the story. 

    Yeah, brilliant is the word.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 31, 2014

    It was so awesome going into this book not really knowing what i

    It was so awesome going into this book not really knowing what it was about or anything else about it. It made the beginning especially so much more awesome.

    I saw The Girl With All the Gifts advertised in ads on my phone and filed the title away in my brain for another day, and then a little while after it came out, it became one of my birthday book picks. I was very excited when it was chosen for my online book club, and while my expectations were fairly high, I was not disappointed.

    I fell in love with the first few chapters of this book as I learned about the world and the people bit by bit through Melanie's eyes, and while I was a bit jarred and disappointed by the changes of POV that take place after the first few chapters, I eventually grew accustomed to it and didn't mind quite as much later on. I loved Melanie's POVs and she was definitely a part of what made this book so awesome for me.

    There's also a lot of science in this book, and though I will admit that in parts, it went over my head, I enjoyed what I understood. It was really interesting in parts, and I liked that it felt plausible, or at least was explained in such a way that it did. I loved that the mystery here was unveiled bit by bit through science and through the characters' experiences and observations.

    As I mentioned before, I was originally disappointed by the multiple POVs. I was also a bit tripped up by the present tense, at least initially. Instead of flowing in my mind, it really stood out to me and I had a hard time getting past it at first, but eventually the story seemed to flow with it a bit better, and I didn't mind so much after I'd read a bit more of the book.

    It's really hard to talk about books that blew you away, but I loved how everything came together. Even though it's been a week since I finished this book, Melanie is still in my head. I can't stop thinking about her.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 17, 2014

    Not just a zombie novel.

    This novel uses the idea of zombies to explore what it is to be human and how love, loyalty and trust affect the way we behave.

    It is not a very bloody version of zombi or vampire novels but it does have some "gross" descriptions. For me, these are outweighed by the development and growth of the characters.

    The main character, Melanie, has distinctive personality and point of view. She combines a sort of innocent idealism with clearsighted intelligence.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 15, 2014

    Not really anither Not really another zombie novel

    This book has such strong characters and smart narration that is too often lacking in these books. Even if youre not a fan of zombie novels. You will love this one.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 4, 2014

    if you read one zombie novel: MAKE IT THIS ONE!

    i love zombies. i also love well-thought-out science fiction, characters with depth, unusual love stories, and exciting plots. this is the book with all the gifts.

    most zombie books choose from one of a few weaknesses: thinly-imagined characters, poorly-thought-out fictional science, gore at the expense of plot. this one redeems the genre. read and enjoy!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 4, 2014

    It grabbed me right away-

    the premise was fascinating until about the last quarter of the story. Then it seemed to lose itself with a saggy dissatisfying ending. We're talking characters facing global disaster - I just expected a smart, quirky ending.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 1, 2014

    Should i

    Should i read im only 10 years old.
    Really i mean its only a free book

    2 out of 23 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 23, 2014

    I was the first

    Loved it

    2 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 10, 2014

    I loved the book. I got a free sample of the first few chapters

    I loved the book. I got a free sample of the first few chapters and didn't even look at it again until a friend mentioned she read it and liked it. I picked up my sample and was so engrossed I had to read the rest. I gave it 4 stars instead of 5 because the ending was kind of a disapointment but other than that I thoroughly enjoyed the book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 8, 2014

    Am getting sample now...

    I just read all of the reviews thus far, and this sounds like a BOOK OF EPIKNEZZ from where I stand. But I'm kinda shying away from spending 13 bucks on a book, when I know for a fact I want to save as much money as possible so I can get the third and fourth Gate 7 books-manga yaaay!-which come up to a grand total of $20-ish. But the premise seems good, so if I like the sample and/or find this is free later, I'm gonna get it.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 8, 2014

    Very different take!

    Anyone that loves the classic undead theme will appreciate this new take. Lots of heart and very engaging.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 6, 2014

    Very good

    Very good couldnt put it down!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 25, 2014

    I loved this book!!  I hope there is mote to the story, I want t

    I loved this book!!  I hope there is mote to the story, I want to know what happens to Melanie. 

    Read this book, it's can't put it down great!!  

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 17, 2014

    Freaky kind of

    Am an 11 year old an dfreaked out when read. It was amazing, but still SUPER freaky i dont reccommend letting anyone my age read it am still shaking

    1 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 27, 2014

    Number duece!

    Love love it it was a very good read

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 17, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    A must read - you must check it out even if you are not into sci-fi.

    I really didn't know what to expect when I opened up this book. All I knew is that Melanie is a special little girl. She has the heart of an angel and the strength of a demon. But what is she? All she knows about her life is held within the walls of her cell. Each morning she is strapped into a wheelchair and waits for class to starts. She likes most of her teachers but really loves Miss Justineau because she exposes her to the worlds that are only in mythology and lands from afar.

    This is a wonderful book that is about strength and the courage to start again. It is written to reveal who Melanie as Melanie is learning who she is and why she is so special. There are a few other characters in the book that makes this journey of knowledge so important. Along with Miss Justineau who is the essence of freedom, there is Dr. Caldwell who is at first a horrible and wicked scientist but proves that all she wanted to do was understand the problem and try to find a cure. You also have Parks and Gallagher - Army men who's one job is to protect the two women and the girl. Each of their lives have been changed and reading of their journey is heartbreaking yet powerful.

    The journey and the unveiling of the truth of Melanie will not only surprise you but also give you a piece of mind that the circle of life is really at play in their lives. M.R. Carey is a master of storytelling and I was very much surprised on how I liked this novel. Well done!

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