The Girl with the Gallery: Edith Halpert and the Making of the Modern Art Market

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Overview


In an era when American artists didn't count and women were expected to stay home, Edith Gregor Halpert burst onto the fledgling New York gallery scene, defying all cultural and societal rules. In 1926, Halpert, just twenty-six years old, opened one of the first art galleries in Greenwich Village and set about turning the art world upside down. Her Downtown Gallery, which she ran for forty-four years, laid the groundwork for the art market's modern era, and its aggressive promotion and sales tactics. Halpert ...
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Overview


In an era when American artists didn't count and women were expected to stay home, Edith Gregor Halpert burst onto the fledgling New York gallery scene, defying all cultural and societal rules. In 1926, Halpert, just twenty-six years old, opened one of the first art galleries in Greenwich Village and set about turning the art world upside down. Her Downtown Gallery, which she ran for forty-four years, laid the groundwork for the art market's modern era, and its aggressive promotion and sales tactics. Halpert cultivated the most illustrious art collectors of the day, invented the market for folk art, and pushed the first group of American artists working in a modern vernacular into the history books, including Stuart Davis, Jacob Lawrence, Georgia O'Keeffe, Ben Shahn, and Arthur Dove. Despite all this, Edith Halpert herself has been lost to history. Until now.

In The Girl with the Gallery, journalist Lindsay Pollock brings Halpert and her era vividly back to life, tracing the story of how this remarkable woman, who started out a penniless Jewish immigrant, made it her mission to fight for American art and artists. Illlustrated with eight pages of full color photographs, this is biography at its finest, an unforgettable story of class, money, vanity, jealousy, and tragic loss.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781586485122
  • Publisher: PublicAffairs
  • Publication date: 10/16/2007
  • Pages: 504
  • Sales rank: 990,476
  • Product dimensions: 5.60 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 1.40 (d)

Meet the Author


Lindsay Pollock is a journalist specializing in the art market. She currently works for Bloomberg News, where she writes a weekly column and reports frequently for TV and radio. A former columnist for the New York Sun, she also writes regularly for Art & Auction, Art News, Art Review, and The Art Newspaper. This is her first book. Lindsay lives in New York City.
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Table of Contents


Introduction     ix
A Samovar in Harlem     1
What Shall I Choose?     22
The Girl with the Gallery     51
Art for the Electric Icebox     70
The Richest Idiot in America     84
One Very Wide-Awake Art Operator     102
Packaging the Primitives     123
The Palace of Virtue     146
A New Deal for Artists     171
Uptown at the Downtown     222
Edith's Victory Garden     253
Inheriting Stieglitz, Courting O'Keeffe     284
Art for Mr. and Mrs. America     318
Dealer Descending     354
Epilogue     381
Notes     387
Bibliography     437
Credits     455
Acknowledgments     459
Index     463
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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 4, 2012

    The early 20th century was filled with all kinds of era breaking

    The early 20th century was filled with all kinds of era breaking art, it was the Americans that put the extra umph in modern art. Edith Gregor Halpert. Growing up as an immigrant in New York, Edith learned to work hard at whatever she did, wheather it was learning English or perfecting her math skills. At a young age, Edith learned the art of business, and then furhter down the road, she perfected her own are of selling, even at one point being one of the most successful people, let alone woman of the time. however, the success was tearing up her marriage, so she quit, hoping to salvage what was left. She wasnt happy not working, so after following her artist husband arround, she realized that even though she couldnt actually produce beautiful art, she did know art, and that owning a gallery featuring the newest of american artist, and modern art. It became her passion and she was widely successful. Quickly she made friends with the richest woman in the country, a Mrs. Rockerfeller. Together they were legendary.

    Overall, i liked the book because it was easy to read, and at times to releate to. I even learned a thing or two. But on the other hand, i disliked it because i felt like it had a lot of excess details that wasnt crucial to the plot, or the overall story.

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