The Gitfing God: A Trinitarian Ethics of Excess [NOOK Book]

Overview

Theories of generosity, or gift giving, are becoming increasingly important in recent work in philosophy and religion. Stephen Webb seeks to build on this renewed interest by surveying a distinctively modern and postmodern approach to the issue of generosity, and then developing a theological framework for it. He analyzes two basic forms of such theories: theories of excess, which emphasize the extravagance of the giving act, and theories of exchange, which look at giving as a form of reciprocity. Excess, which ...
See more details below
The Gitfing God: A Trinitarian Ethics of Excess

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$95.00
BN.com price

Overview

Theories of generosity, or gift giving, are becoming increasingly important in recent work in philosophy and religion. Stephen Webb seeks to build on this renewed interest by surveying a distinctively modern and postmodern approach to the issue of generosity, and then developing a theological framework for it. He analyzes two basic forms of such theories: theories of excess, which emphasize the extravagance of the giving act, and theories of exchange, which look at giving as a form of reciprocity. Excess, which Webb calls "squandering," is disconnected from considerations of morality and community. Similarly, giving as exchange reduces generosity to mere calculations of the market. Webb contends that for this reason, in many ways, society has become suspicious of charity and generosity. This cynicism has led to quick and easy judgments that, in turn, have led to a new orthodoxy with its own troubling consequences. Webb argues that we need to recover the generosity that our culture obscures behind this monologue on self-interest, and that theology, as a form of critical thought, can play a helpful role. Through the example of a trinitarian God, who is the Giver, the Given, and the Giving, he demonstrates how giving can be born of excess but bound by a community of responsibility and mutuality - other-oriented without being self-negating. He maintains that the generosity of God's grace, properly understood, can reorient our own idea of the gift and must be correlated to our own practices of exchange and reciprocity.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Stephen Webb's The Gifting God is a creative and important work of constructive, rhetorical theology...The Gifting God is an engaging and generous work, a gift worth passing along."—Encounter

"Stephen Webb's The Gifting God is an insightful and broad study of the contemporary debates about the possibilities and limits of giving and generosity...I would recommend this book as a map for anyone interested in contemporary theology, philosophy, and social theory."—The Cresset

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780195344561
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press
  • Publication date: 4/18/1996
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • File size: 281 KB

Table of Contents

Introduction: Giving and Thinking 3
1 The Return of the Gift 13
Between Excess and Exchange 14
Style and Function 16
The Gift of Marcel Mauss 32
Marshall Sahlins and the Recovery of Abundance 36
Pierre Bourdieu and the Total Critique of Giving 39
Richard Titmus and the Social Utility of Giving 41
Lewis Hyde and the Community of the Gifted 43
2 Squandering 47
Against Gratitude 49
Emerson and the Denial of Debt 55
Nietzsche and Self-Giving 58
Derrida and the End(lessness) of Giving 67
3 The Theo-Economics of God 83
Giving the Given Gift 84
Calvin and the Labor of Gratitude 94
Karl Barth and God's Freedom 98
Charles Hartshorne and God's Reciprocity 104
Sallie McFague and God's Embodiment 108
Mark C. Taylor and God's Radical Immanence 111
Peter C. Hodgson and God's Persuasive Dialectics 116
4 How Giving Works 123
Giving and Being 129
Giving and Saving 133
God the Giver 139
God the Given 141
God the Giving 146
Notes 159
Index 190
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)