The Glass Bead Game

( 22 )

Overview

The final novel of Hermann Hesse, for which he won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1946, The Glass Bead Game is a fascinating tale of the complexity of modern life as well as a classic of modern literature

Set in the 23rd century, The Glass Bead Game is the story of Joseph Knecht, who has been raised in Castalia, the remote place his society has provided for the intellectual elite to grow and flourish. Since childhood, Knecht has been consumed with mastering the Glass Bead ...

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The Glass Bead Game: (Magister Ludi) A Novel

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Overview

The final novel of Hermann Hesse, for which he won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1946, The Glass Bead Game is a fascinating tale of the complexity of modern life as well as a classic of modern literature

Set in the 23rd century, The Glass Bead Game is the story of Joseph Knecht, who has been raised in Castalia, the remote place his society has provided for the intellectual elite to grow and flourish. Since childhood, Knecht has been consumed with mastering the Glass Bead Game, which requires a synthesis of aesthetics and scientific arts, such as mathematics, music, logic, and philosophy, which he achieves in adulthood, becoming a Magister Ludi (Master of the Game).

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780312278496
  • Publisher: Picador
  • Publication date: 12/6/2002
  • Edition description: First Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 576
  • Sales rank: 150,034
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 8.24 (h) x 0.98 (d)

Meet the Author

Hermann Hesse was born in Germany in 1877 and later became a citizen of Switzerland. As a Western man profoundly affected by the mysticism of Eastern thought, he wrote novels, stories, and essays bearing a vital spiritual force that has captured the imagination and loyalty of many generations of readers. His works include Steppenwolf, Narcissus and Goldmund, and The Glass Bead Game. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1946. Hermann Hesse died in 1962.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 22 )
Rating Distribution

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 22 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 16, 2003

    Cunning Joke

    What many readers have failed to realize about Master Ludi(Glass Bead Game) is that it is a cunning artistic joke, yet most of the Constant Readers' appoach it with scholarly reverance and a grave nature. If you like Hesse or just heard of the Glass Bead game by chance, I thoroughly recommend reading it, But just be cogniscent of the fact that it is meant to be a parody of a biograhy.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 10, 2003

    Hesse's Greatest Work

    In The Glass Bead Game Hesse continues his tradition of following a character around throughout his entire life. In Knecht's case, the life is in a less familiar location than many Hesse has described, but because of this Knecht is more recognizeable than, for instance, Goldmund or Siddhartha. Nietzsche's influence on Hesse is also more obvious here than elswhere, especially in the the idea of 'going down' at the end of the novel. Hesse also continues to state, as in 'Siddhartha' and 'Narcissus and Goldmund,' that the correct path can never be mapped, and that the only good paths are the ones we make for ourselves. Like everything else by Hesse, this is a wonderful read, and I wholeheartedly recommend it.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 25, 2003

    This is the most well-known Hesse's book in Japan

    This story evoked junior or highschool student's sympathy in Japan. They are under the pressure of the ordeal of the examination like this main character. This book gives a vivid description of the delicate feeling of a boy at puberty.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 6, 2014

    Folly and glory

    I so much enjoy rhe glory as well as the folly of the intellectual life as portrayed here. Glad to have it on my nook!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 28, 2001

    Solemn, serene, sui generis...

    Hesse's most venerated novel decidedly delineates his uncanny erudition and perspicacity. His consummately captivating concoction will retain any reader with extravagant tenacity. No other author has so passionately promulgated such profundity. The Glass Bead Game is indubitably indispensable.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 19, 2001

    Enlightening.

    While at times sedate and far from action-packed, this book tranports the reader's mind to a different way of looking at the world. Two highlights were the insightful evaluation of today's society in the 'introduction', and the very last paragraph of the book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 21, 2001

    Essential and Sublime

    This is a wonderful book. Essential and totally worth the effort of putting in the time and calmness to read it. I write this review only to counter some of the more negative things said in this Review Section about this important and fulfilling work

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 1, 2001

    The lumbering giant

    Here was a book that promised to be an interesting and maybe , more importantly ,an intellectual book that would enlighten us more about the human condition. I don't know what it was .Perhaps it was the translation but this book proved to be a slow lumbering intellectual book that went too slow. I realise I repeat myself but this is how boring this book was . I only made it half-way through and that was a good 300 pages into the story. At that point our hero had only just become the Ludi Magister. That's just not fair! I did skim through the last few pages and there did seem to be more intersting stuff but I couldn't get there unless I got through another 100 pages of this story. This book is intellectual but it just fails to keep your attention. I tip my hat to those who stuck it out to the end!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 22, 2000

    A Splendid Configuration

    Herman Hesse's Glasperlenspiel is perhaps the most honest and pure work of modest scholaticism. He is by far an artist who's mystified and perplexed by culture and the unity of humanity despite centuries of divided dogma and doctrine. Hesse breathes life into the gap between those centuries, creating a dynamism of soul and mind unmatched. He is terrific!!

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    Posted December 3, 2008

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    Posted December 25, 2009

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    Posted August 20, 2009

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    Posted September 4, 2011

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    Posted March 3, 2009

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    Posted July 8, 2009

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    Posted June 10, 2009

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    Posted November 18, 2009

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    Posted October 22, 2009

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    Posted May 19, 2009

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    Posted October 30, 2009

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