The Glass Bead Game (Magister Ludi)

The Glass Bead Game (Magister Ludi)

4.5 22
by Hermann Hesse
     
 

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Final novel by Hermann Hesse, published in two volumes in 1943 in German as Das Glasperlenspiel, and sometimes translated as Magister Ludi. The book is an intricate bildungsroman about humanity's eternal quest for enlightenment and for synthesis of the intellectual and the participatory life. Set in the 23rd century, the novel purports to be a biography of Josef

Overview

Final novel by Hermann Hesse, published in two volumes in 1943 in German as Das Glasperlenspiel, and sometimes translated as Magister Ludi. The book is an intricate bildungsroman about humanity's eternal quest for enlightenment and for synthesis of the intellectual and the participatory life. Set in the 23rd century, the novel purports to be a biography of Josef Knecht ("servant" in German), who has been reared in Castalia, the remote place his society has provided for the intellectual elite to grow and flourish. Since childhood, Knecht has been consumed with mastering the Glass Bead Game, which requires a synthesis of aesthetics and scientific arts, such as mathematics, music, logic, and philosophy. This he achieves in adulthood, becoming a Magister Ludi (Master of the Game).

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9788087888384
Publisher:
David Rehak
Publication date:
09/21/2013
Pages:
250
Sales rank:
495,164
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.57(d)

Meet the Author

Hermann Hesse was born in Germany in 1877 and later became a citizen of Switzerland. As a Western man profoundly affected by the mysticism of Eastern thought, he wrote many novels, stories, and essays that bear a vital spiritual force that has captured the imagination and loyalty of many generations of readers. His works include Steppenwolf, Narcissus and Goldmund, and The Glass Bead Game. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1946. Hermann Hesse died in 1962.

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The Glass Bead Game 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 22 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
What many readers have failed to realize about Master Ludi(Glass Bead Game) is that it is a cunning artistic joke, yet most of the Constant Readers' appoach it with scholarly reverance and a grave nature. If you like Hesse or just heard of the Glass Bead game by chance, I thoroughly recommend reading it, But just be cogniscent of the fact that it is meant to be a parody of a biograhy.
Guest More than 1 year ago
In The Glass Bead Game Hesse continues his tradition of following a character around throughout his entire life. In Knecht's case, the life is in a less familiar location than many Hesse has described, but because of this Knecht is more recognizeable than, for instance, Goldmund or Siddhartha. Nietzsche's influence on Hesse is also more obvious here than elswhere, especially in the the idea of 'going down' at the end of the novel. Hesse also continues to state, as in 'Siddhartha' and 'Narcissus and Goldmund,' that the correct path can never be mapped, and that the only good paths are the ones we make for ourselves. Like everything else by Hesse, this is a wonderful read, and I wholeheartedly recommend it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I so much enjoy rhe glory as well as the folly of the intellectual life as portrayed here. Glad to have it on my nook!
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Guest More than 1 year ago
This story evoked junior or highschool student's sympathy in Japan. They are under the pressure of the ordeal of the examination like this main character. This book gives a vivid description of the delicate feeling of a boy at puberty.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Hesse's most venerated novel decidedly delineates his uncanny erudition and perspicacity. His consummately captivating concoction will retain any reader with extravagant tenacity. No other author has so passionately promulgated such profundity. The Glass Bead Game is indubitably indispensable.
Guest More than 1 year ago
While at times sedate and far from action-packed, this book tranports the reader's mind to a different way of looking at the world. Two highlights were the insightful evaluation of today's society in the 'introduction', and the very last paragraph of the book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a wonderful book. Essential and totally worth the effort of putting in the time and calmness to read it. I write this review only to counter some of the more negative things said in this Review Section about this important and fulfilling work
Guest More than 1 year ago
Herman Hesse's Glasperlenspiel is perhaps the most honest and pure work of modest scholaticism. He is by far an artist who's mystified and perplexed by culture and the unity of humanity despite centuries of divided dogma and doctrine. Hesse breathes life into the gap between those centuries, creating a dynamism of soul and mind unmatched. He is terrific!!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Here was a book that promised to be an interesting and maybe , more importantly ,an intellectual book that would enlighten us more about the human condition. I don't know what it was .Perhaps it was the translation but this book proved to be a slow lumbering intellectual book that went too slow. I realise I repeat myself but this is how boring this book was . I only made it half-way through and that was a good 300 pages into the story. At that point our hero had only just become the Ludi Magister. That's just not fair! I did skim through the last few pages and there did seem to be more intersting stuff but I couldn't get there unless I got through another 100 pages of this story. This book is intellectual but it just fails to keep your attention. I tip my hat to those who stuck it out to the end!