The Glass Casket [NOOK Book]

Overview

Death hasn't visited Rowan Rose since it took her mother when Rowan was only a little girl. But that changes one bleak morning, when five horses and their riders thunder into her village and through the forest, disappearing into the hills. Days later, the riders' bodies are found, and though no one can say for certain what happened in their final hours, their remains prove that whatever it was must have been brutal.
   Rowan's village was once a tranquil place, but now...
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The Glass Casket

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Overview

Death hasn't visited Rowan Rose since it took her mother when Rowan was only a little girl. But that changes one bleak morning, when five horses and their riders thunder into her village and through the forest, disappearing into the hills. Days later, the riders' bodies are found, and though no one can say for certain what happened in their final hours, their remains prove that whatever it was must have been brutal.
   Rowan's village was once a tranquil place, but now things have changed. Something has followed the path those riders made and has come down from the hills, through the forest, and into the village. Beast or man, it has brought death to Rowan's door once again.
   Only this time, its appetite is insatiable.

[STAR] "With stylish prose, richly developed characters and well-realized worldbuilding, Templeman plumbs archetypes of folklore to create a compelling blend of mythic elements and realistic teen experience."-Kirkus Reviews, Starred

[STAR] "This has both the stylish beauty of those [classic fairy] tales and the chilling darkness that makes them timeless."-The Bulletin, Starred

“The legion of Maggie Stiefvater fans out there ought to look this way.”-Booklist


From the Hardcover edition.
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Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal
02/01/2014
Gr 8 Up—Rowan and Tom are best friends, having grown up together in the village of Nag's End. When five of the King's men are found brutally murdered, the townspeople investigate but find more questions than answers. Rowan's cousin, Fiona Eira, shows up at the village, attracting Tom's eye before she is found with her heart torn out. Her body is encased in a glass casket by her grieving father, and more gruesome killings follow. Tom and Rowan, along with most of the villagers, are desperate to find answers. Who or what is to blame? Could the murders be related to magic, witches, wolves, or ghosts? Templeman does a creepy (and bloody) job of describing the crimes and their culprit, but gives few details about a visiting duke, his ward, and most of the villagers. Since the story is set in a fantastical past, when few girls are taught to read and candles provide light, the occasional use of contemporary phrases sound out of place. Templeman includes nods to both folklore and classic literature in this atmospheric tale.—Maggie Knapp, Trinity Valley School, Fort Worth, TX
From the Publisher
[STAR] "With stylish prose, richly developed characters and well-realized worldbuilding, Templeman plumbs archetypes of folklore to create a compelling blend of mythic elements and realistic teen experience."-Kirkus Reviews, Starred

[STAR] "This has both the stylish beauty of those [classic fairy] tales and the chilling darkness that makes them timeless."-The Bulletin, Starred

“The legion of Maggie Stiefvater fans out there ought to look this way.”-Booklist

Kirkus Reviews
★ 2013-11-13
In the woods above the quiet mountain village of Nag's End, five soldiers of the king are mysteriously killed. Village elders presume it was a wolf attack, but Tom and his brother Jude are convinced that no animal could have inflicted the horror that they saw up on icy Beggar's Drift. Tom's best friend, Rowan Rose, is warned by her scholar father not to succumb to the others' fear of witches, goblins and wood sprites. But it becomes hard to ignore the strange goings-on, especially after Fiona Eira, a cousin Rowan never knew she had, arrives. Tom, who's looking for a "grand love," thinks he's found it with the enchanting Fiona. He gives her a coin he found on Beggar's Drift that may be connected to a greater evil than anyone imagined. A complex, layered plot highlights a split between those who cling to traditional beliefs and young people who look for rational explanations for what turns out to be a string of grisly deaths in the village and surrounding forest. Twists and turns keep readers in suspense as Rowan, Fiona, Tom and Jude navigate a convoluted path through sibling rivalry and friendship en route to adulthood. With stylish prose, richly developed characters and well-realized worldbuilding, Templeman plumbs archetypes of folklore to create a compelling blend of mythic elements and realistic teen experience. (Fantasy. 12-17)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780449813157
  • Publisher: Random House Children's Books
  • Publication date: 2/11/2014
  • Sold by: Random House
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 352
  • Sales rank: 410,743
  • Age range: 14 years
  • File size: 3 MB

Meet the Author

   McCormick Templeman has a BA in English Literature from Reed College and an MFA in Writing and Poetics from Naropa University. She is also the author of The Little Woods.
   McCormick lives and writes in California. Learn more about her and her books at McCormickTempleman.com.


From the Hardcover edition.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 4 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 16, 2014

    Sucky

    It was pretty bad and im pretty open minded when it comes to books.
    :(

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 8, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    This novel literally combines some of my favorite story elements

    This novel literally combines some of my favorite story elements and, to my heart's delight, Templeman used them all exceedingly well. I love it when things are set in a small village and the creep factor is high. For some, the first 100 pages could be a bit slow but I found them rather intriguing.

    Templeman created a bleak atmosphere. Here's a town where nothing has really happened for years and suddenly, a group of the king's soldiers die on the mountain top. The villagers hurriedly shrug it off as a wolf attack and although as a reader you know it's something more, you don't really feel the danger quite yet. Then someone you actually know dies and that's when things start escalating. The atmosphere steadily builds upon itself until you reach the last 150 pages and the creep factor is sky high. When it reaches that point though, it stays there right up until basically the very end.

    There were quite a few point of views (POVs) but this technique was absolutely perfect for the novel. The POVs did switch quite frequently but seeing the village and events through a variety of eyes only made everything creepier. It didn't give away the mystery. You still had to put it together. But instead of hearing about some of the deaths, you actually see them.

    While I enjoyed the characters, I wouldn't say I really connected to them. This just isn't one of those type of novels. This novel is more plot-centered than it is character-centered. Sure, I backed certain characters (Jude, my friends, Jude), but Jude, Rowan, and Tom could have just as easily died and I would have been okay. This might seem detrimental but it really isn't, not with this book. This was about the monster in the woods. It was about discovering the evil that hid there and getting rid of it. It didn't matter who did it as long as it was killed.

    It should also be noted that, although this is high fantasy, I wouldn't expect a sweeping world. Again, this isn't detrimental. Often times, we're lured into high fantasy because of books like The Lord of the Rings and Throne of Glass. This just isn't that type of book. This is more concentrated. You see the beliefs of the villagers and their lives. It's all very well developed and you become intimately familiar with this small village. But this book isn't about saving the world. This is about a village on the brink.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 8, 2014

    The Glass Casket was a fantastic read! A scary (and mysterious!)

    The Glass Casket was a fantastic read! A scary (and mysterious!) re-telling / re-weaving of several fairy tales, it kept me up late, turning the pages with the flashlight under the covers. So spooky, but worth it! 

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 18, 2014

    H

    G

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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