×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Glass Passenger
     

The Glass Passenger

5.0 9
by Jack's Mannequin
 

See All Formats & Editions

Andrew McMahon made his exit from Something Corporate in 2004 and launched Jack's Mannequin the following year, funneling his taste for sun-kissed power pop and piano-fueled ballads into Everything in Transit. The album was a strong, cohesive effort from a songwriter who previously sailed

Overview

Andrew McMahon made his exit from Something Corporate in 2004 and launched Jack's Mannequin the following year, funneling his taste for sun-kissed power pop and piano-fueled ballads into Everything in Transit. The album was a strong, cohesive effort from a songwriter who previously sailed beneath many critics' radars, but McMahon's success provided little relief from his plummeting health. He was diagnosed with leukemia two months before the album's release, and a series of chemotherapy treatments prevented him from supporting Everything in Transit with a proper tour. Three years later, McMahon (now cancer-free) returns with his much-anticipated second album. Like Something Corporate's own sophomore effort, The Glass Passenger captures McMahon during a darker period -- understandably so, given his recent history -- and the introspective tone sometimes pales in comparison to the summery songs that graced Everything in Transit and Something Corporate's debut, Leaving Through the Window. There's pain here -- morphine drips, decreased sex drives, and the like -- and McMahon tackles those difficult subjects bluntly and tactfully. "What Gets You Off" deals with the recovery of his libido, even if the song sounds somewhat flaccid until the chorus' arrival, while "Hammers and Strings (A Lullaby)" is a vintage, waltzing ballad that serves as a pledge to McMahon's returning fans. "To the sleepless, this is my reply," he sings, "I will write you a lullaby." From the woozy, theatrical elegance of "Caves" to the orchestrated "Annie Use Your Telescope," ballads account for a big portion of The Glass Passenger, yet some of the album's best moments still occur during the faster songs. "Spinning" is a surging pop
ock gem, simple enough to become the most instantly recognizable song on the disc, while "American Love" and "Bloodshot" are flecked with buzzing synths and other New Wave flourishes. The Glass Passenger might not bare the same pop hooks as Everything in Transit, but it does stay afloat under the weight of McMahon's past, which bodes well for the songwriter's future work.

Product Details

Release Date:
09/30/2008
Label:
Warner Bros / Wea
UPC:
0093624989707
catalogNumber:
371452
Rank:
16394

Related Subjects

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Jack's Mannequin   Primary Artist
P.J. Smith   Background Vocals
Patrick Warren   Keyboards,Bells,chamberlain,Pump Organ
CJ Eiriksson   Drums,Tambourine
Carlos Sosa   Saxophone
Raúl Vallejo   Trombone
Stacy Clark   Background Vocals
Aaron "Arvis" Dixon   Guitar
Bobby Raw   Guitar,Kazoo,Background Vocals
Fernando "Radical" Castillo   Trumpet
Andrew James McMahon   Piano,Glockenspiel,Kazoo,Keyboards,Hammond Organ,Vocals,Hand Clapping,Foot Stomping
Max Coane   Percussion

Technical Credits

Bobby Huber   Engineer
Pete Martinez   Engineer
Patrick Warren   Arranger
Jim Wirt   Producer
CJ Eiriksson   Programming,Producer,Engineer
Alec Edmunds   Engineer
Carl Stubner   Management
Mouminatou Camara   Engineer
Keith Armstrong   Engineer
Neil Couser   Engineer
Aaron "Arvis" Dixon   Management
Nicolas Fournier   Engineer
Andrew James McMahon   Producer
Nik Karpen   Engineer
Josey Alcantar   Engineer
Jacob Sciba   Engineer
Clifton Allen   Engineer
Chris Rezanson   Programming
Adam Fuller   Engineer
Max Coane   Programming,Engineer
Jared Dodd   Engineer
Spencer Guerra   Engineer
Bobby "Raw" Anderson   Producer

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

The Glass Passenger 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 9 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
leather_library More than 1 year ago
I love Jack's Mannequin (and Something Corporate before them) so maybe I'm a bit biased; except that when I first heard the CD I don't remember being impressed because I thought it sounded a bit different from the first (Everything in Transit) but slowly, it grew on me. Now, almost a year later, I listen to it almost constantly (with the exception of "Hammers and Strings") and I couldn't be happier that I bought it. Definitely a recommended listen for any fans of Andrew or who just like that sort of emotional-without-being-completely-emo music.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago