The Gloria Anzaldúa Reader

Overview

Born in the Río Grande Valley of south Texas, independent scholar and creative writer Gloria Anzaldúa was an internationally acclaimed cultural theorist. As the author of Borderlands / La Frontera: The New Mestiza, Anzaldúa played a major role in shaping contemporary Chicano/a and lesbian/queer theories and identities. As an editor of three anthologies, including the groundbreaking This Bridge Called My Back: Writings by Radical Women of Color, she played an equally vital role in developing an inclusionary, ...

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Overview

Born in the Río Grande Valley of south Texas, independent scholar and creative writer Gloria Anzaldúa was an internationally acclaimed cultural theorist. As the author of Borderlands / La Frontera: The New Mestiza, Anzaldúa played a major role in shaping contemporary Chicano/a and lesbian/queer theories and identities. As an editor of three anthologies, including the groundbreaking This Bridge Called My Back: Writings by Radical Women of Color, she played an equally vital role in developing an inclusionary, multicultural feminist movement. A versatile author, Anzaldúa published poetry, theoretical essays, short stories, autobiographical narratives, interviews, and children’s books. Her work, which has been included in more than 100 anthologies to date, has helped to transform academic fields including American, Chicano/a, composition, ethnic, literary, and women’s studies.

This reader—which provides a representative sample of the poetry, prose, fiction, and experimental autobiographical writing that Anzaldúa produced during her thirty-year career—demonstrates the breadth and philosophical depth of her work. While the reader contains much of Anzaldúa’s published writing (including several pieces now out of print), more than half the material has never before been published. This newly available work offers fresh insights into crucial aspects of Anzaldúa’s life and career, including her upbringing, education, teaching experiences, writing practice and aesthetics, lifelong health struggles, and interest in visual art, as well as her theories of disability, multiculturalism, pedagogy, and spiritual activism. The pieces are arranged chronologically; each one is preceded by a brief introduction. The collection includes a glossary of Anzaldúa’s key terms and concepts, a timeline of her life, primary and secondary bibliographies, and a detailed index.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Keating collects poems, essays, prose and commentaries by Anzaldúa, revealing the public figure—the pathbreaking queer Chicana writer—as well as a sensual and deeply spiritual iconoclast. Anzaldúa’s voice emerges—defiant, mercenary, passionate and unapologetic—as she writes her seminal Borderlands/La frontera while teaching in Vermont, an environment so alien it brought her closer to her roots; as she becomes one of the first to teach Chicano literature to her students; as she compiles the classic feminist anthology This Bridge Called My Back. The book is punctuated by Anzaldúa’s simple drawings, exercises in deconstruction and reconstruction of identity. Her writings capturing her relentless fight to avoid being stereotyped and to empower women of color within and without academia are rich and various, exploring everything from gender, memory and oppression to sex in the afterlife. (Jan.)
From the Publisher

“The Reader does a good job of offering a wide range of Anzaldúa’s writings, from her most famous and well-loved essays that appeared in the seminal Borderlands/La Frontera: The New Mestiza to never-before-published poems, experimental fiction, interviews, e-mail communications, and unfinished pieces. Anzaldúa was a notorious perfectionist, sometimes revising essays and stories until an editor had to yank them from her hands. Still, this selection would’ve made Anzaldúa proud.” - Liliana Valenzuela, Texas Observer

“Compiled and edited by AnaLouise Keating, Anzaldúa’s long-time co-editor on decolonizing book projects such as this bridge we call home, The Anzaldúa Reader provides an in-depth view of the wide scope of Anzaldúa’s
interests and the developing nature of key concepts throughout her writing career. And it is this developing life project of Anzaldúa, the queer mestiza writer-poet-healer-activist, that provides the narrative structure for the Reader.” - George Hartley, Southwestern American Literature

“This stunning anthology offers the best of Anzaldua, a versatile author, self-described as a queer mestiza Chicana feminist poet-philosopher. Her prolific poetry, theory, ‘autohistoria,’ short stories, and drawings are compiled in this thought-provoking volume.” - WATERwheel

The Gloria Anzaldúa Reader is the first and most comprehensive collection of Anzaldúa’s works. Keating has woven them carefully and artfully together into a tapestry sparkling with Anzaldúa’s insights, such as her theories of new tribalism, left-handed world, la mestiza consciousness, and spiritual activism.” - Xiumei Pu, Feminist Formations

“AnaLouise Keating’s compilation of Gloria Anzaldúa’s ‘early,’ ‘middle,’ and ‘later’ writings provides a service to scholars; additionally, it is a joy to read Gloria’s voice seeped in ‘shaman aesthetics’ that impel and move us to radical action. Undoubtedly, Anzaldúa’s impact on various levels—including academic fields such as border studies, women’s studies, and American studies—is long-lasting and profound.”— Norma E. Cantú, University of Texas at San Antonio, founder of the Society for the Study of Gloria Anzaldúa

“Gloria Anzaldúa was a courageous participant in late-twentieth-century decolonial movements. Throughout this reader she insists that academic knowledge must take into account the spirit-body-emotions-mind matrix. Such an accounting would transform academic knowledge, she believed, and make way for emancipatory modes of knowing and for brave, new subjects of history. The Gloria Anzaldúa Reader samples the bold lifework of a woman whose aims were to relieve suffering and to envision a decolonizing social affinity capable of uniting humanity in love.”—Chela Sandoval, author of Methodology of the Oppressed

Liliana Valenzuela

“The Reader does a good job of offering a wide range of Anzaldúa’s writings, from her most famous and well-loved essays that appeared in the seminal Borderlands/La Frontera: The New Mestiza to never-before-published poems, experimental fiction, interviews, e-mail communications, and unfinished pieces. Anzaldúa was a notorious perfectionist, sometimes revising essays and stories until an editor had to yank them from her hands. Still, this selection would’ve made Anzaldúa proud.”
WATERwheel

“This stunning anthology offers the best of Anzaldua, a versatile author, self-described as a queer mestiza Chicana feminist poet-philosopher. Her prolific poetry, theory, ‘autohistoria,’ short stories, and drawings are compiled in this thought-provoking volume.”
George Hartley

“Compiled and edited by AnaLouise Keating, Anzaldúa’s long-time co-editor on decolonizing book projects such as this bridge we call home, The Anzaldúa Reader provides an in-depth view of the wide scope of Anzaldúa’s interests and the developing nature of key concepts throughout her writing career. And it is this developing life project of Anzaldúa, the queer mestiza writer-poet-healer-activist, that provides the narrative structure for the Reader.”
Xiumei Pu

The Gloria Anzaldúa Reader is the first and most comprehensive collection of Anzaldúa’s works. Keating has woven them carefully and artfully together into a tapestry sparkling with Anzaldúa’s insights, such as her theories of new tribalism, left-handed world, la mestiza consciousness, and spiritual activism.”
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780822345558
  • Publisher: Duke University Press Books
  • Publication date: 11/1/2009
  • Series: Latin America Otherwise Series
  • Pages: 376
  • Product dimensions: 6.30 (w) x 9.30 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author

Gloria Anzaldúa (1942–2004) was a visionary writer whose work was recognized with many honors, including the Before Columbus Foundation American Book Award, a Lambda literary award, the National Endowment for the Arts Fiction Award, and the Bode-Pearson Prize for Outstanding Contributions to American Studies. Her book Borderlands/La frontera was selected as one of the 100 Best Books of the Century by Hungry Mind Review and the Utne Reader. AnaLouise Keating, Professor of Women’s Studies at Texas Woman’s University, is the author of Women Reading, Women Writing: Self-Invention in Paula Gunn Allen, Gloria Anzaldúa, and Audre Lorde; editor of Anzaldúa’s Interviews/Entrevistas and EntreMundos/AmongWorlds: New Perspectives on Gloria Anzaldúa; and co-editor, with Anzaldúa, of this bridge we call home: radical visions for transformation.

AnaLouise Keating, Professor of Women’s Studies at Texas Woman’s University, is the author of Women Reading, Women Writing: Self-Invention in Paula Gunn Allen, Gloria Anzaldúa, and Audre Lorde; editor of Anzaldúa’s Interviews/Entrevistas and EntreMundos/AmongWorlds: New Perspectives on Gloria Anzaldúa; and co-editor, with Anzaldúa, of this bridge we call home: radical visions for transformation.

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Read an Excerpt

The Gloria Anzaldúa Reader


By GLORIA E. ANZALDÚA

DUKE UNIVERSITY PRESS

Copyright © 2009 Duke University Press
All right reserved.

ISBN: 978-0-8223-4564-0


Chapter One

Part One

"Early" Writings

I am a wind-swayed bridge, a crossroads inhabited by whirlwinds. Gloria, the facilitator, Gloria, the mediator, straddling the walls between abysses. "Your allegiance is to La Raza, the Chicano movement," say the members of my race. "Your allegiance is to the third world," say my Black and Asian friends. "Your allegiance is to your gender, to women," say the feminists. Then there's my allegiance to the gay movement, to the socialist revolution, to the new Age, to magic and the occult. And there's my affinity to literature, to the world of the artist. What am I? A third world lesbian feminist with Marxist and mystic leanings. They would chop me up into little fragments and tag each piece with a label. You say my name is ambivalence? Think of me as Shiva, a many-armed and -legged body with one foot on brown soil, one on white, one in straight society, one in the gay world, the man's world, the women's, one limb in the literary world, another in the working class, the socialist, and the occult worlds. A sort of spider woman hanging by one thin strand of web. Who, me, confused? Ambivalent? Not so. Only your labels split me. -From "La prieta"

This poem, written in 1974 and published in 1976 in Tejidos, a literary journal, was Anzaldúa's first publication. Adopting the voice of an Aztec ceremonial knife, Anzaldúa explores issues that recur throughout her work. Significantly, Anzaldúa included this poem in her poetry manuscript version of Borderlands (1985) and titled the manuscript's first section "Tihueque / now let us go."

TIHUEQUE

One year in a distant century during Teoteco, The 12th month of the solar year Five Rabbit, in the reign of the Four-Water Sun, I carved 12,000 hearts in honor of Huitziltopochtli, God of War, who made the sun rise each morning. In each succeeding year thereafter ceremonial drunkenness robbed me as many hearts embraced the furnace sacrifice. Only the hearts of the finest Náhuatl braves and luckiest prisoners and warriors ate the sacred flesh. Today I lie in a musty museum and register 5.5 on Mohs scale. But my origin, volcanic obsidian, hard as granite comes in good stead. In my childhood I was a mirror. I threw a vitreous luster, dark-green. But now the iron oxide running in my veins dulls my edge and the air bubbles trapped in me reflect my age. Time passes. I rest and await the flesh.

In this poem, written in 1974 and never before published, Anzaldúa draws from and reflects on her experiences teaching in the south Texas public school system.

To Delia, Who Failed on Principles

Because of four lousy points Delia, a senior, repeating A sophomore course Failed. Short of hair, cow-eyed, humble-proud From cooking class brought me cookies From Oregon, an apple. But I stuck to My principles. In arbitrary tests the high score Of momentarily memorized words and facts I passed, but you Didn't graduate. I stuck to my principles And for a week couldn't sleep The following year I passed all repeaters who tried On principle.

Written in 1974, this previously unpublished poem resonates strongly with sections of Borderlands/La Frontera and "The New Mestiza nation," indicating that even in the early 1970s, Anzaldúa defined herself in terms of multiplicity and transformation.

Reincarnation

for Julie

I slithered shedding my self on the path then looked back and contemplated the husk and wondered which me I had discarded and was it the second or the two thousand and thirty-second and how many me's would I slough off before voiding the core if ever

June 20, 1974 South Bend, IN

Anzaldúa often included this never before published poem, written in the mid-1970s, in her poetry readings during the early 1980s. Titled in earlier drafts "One of us" and "possession," this short poem illustrates Anzaldúa's challenges to conventional concepts of identity and relationships.

The Occupant

I wake one morning to his body filling mine I watch him crowd my entrails out through my navel His head's too snug in mine the pressure's making my skull plate flap like the cover of a boiling kettle A cock's growing out of my cunt I'm getting hair on my chest I'm for sharing but this is absurd One of us has got to go One of us is going to occupy the other to death One of us is going to emerge sobbing with sorrow from the bloody remnant of the other.

This previously unpublished poem, written in 1974, was one that Anzaldúa sometimes read at poetry readings during the late 1970s and early 1980s. In its expression of a desire to be radically transformed and inspired, the poem offers interesting insights into her aesthetics. (Note the connections with "speaking in tongues," also included in part 1.)

I Want To Be Shocked Shitless

I'm afraid, I told them, that you will open no gates for me, that neither one of you will floor me. I fear that the hooks in your words will not grip me that I will vanish into that inner terrain where none follow. I fear you will bore me. I know you will call me on the awkward line, the hollow word. But the truths I don't uncover, the visions I don't aim toward, don't reach, will you- I don't want to be told what to write I can excavate my own content I want to be pushed into digging deep wells in unheard of lands. I want you to give me eyes in in the back of my head. Be a thunder clap and rouse me. Be an earthquake make me tremble Be a river raging rampant in my veins. Shock me shitless.

This previously unpublished poem, written in the mid-1970s, offers insight into Anzaldúa's poetics and her beliefs about language, inspiration, and poets' roles in society. "The new speakers" also seems to hint at some of Anzaldúa's own writerly desires.

The New Speakers

(For Frieda)

Words are our trade we speak them soft we speak them hard we do not push the hand that writes, the times do that. We are our age's mouthpiece. There is no need for words to fester in our minds they germinate in the open mouth of the barefoot child, in the midst of restive crowds. They wither in ivory towers and are dissected in college classes. Words. Some come trippingly on the palate. Some come laboriously. Some are quickened by friends, some prompted by passersby. Critics label the speakers: male, female. They assign genitals to our words but we're not just penises or vaginas nor are our words easy to classify Some of us are still hung- Up on the art-for-art trip and feel that the poet is forever alone. Separate. More sensitive. An outcast. That suffering is a way of life, that suffering is a virtue that suffering is the price we pay for seeing the future. Some of us are still hung up substituting words for relationships substituting writing for living. But what we want -what we presume to want- is to see our words engraved on the people's faces, feel our words catalyze emotions in their lives. What we want is to become part of the common consumption like coffee with morning paper. We don't want to be Stars but parts of constellations.

This epistolary essay, which Anzaldúa began drafting in 1979, was published in This Bridge Called My Back: Writings by Radical Women of Color (1981). Here Anzaldúa offers one of her most sustained discussions of writing and illustrates her career-long belief in the power of the written word.

Speaking in Tongues A Letter to Third World Women Writers

21 mayo 80

Dear mujeres de color, companions in writing- I sit here naked in the sun, typewriter against my knee, trying to visualize you. Black woman huddles over a desk in the fifth floor of some New York tenement. Sitting on a porch in south Texas, a Chicana fanning away mosquitos and the hot air, trying to arouse the smouldering embers of writing. Indian woman walking to school or work, lamenting the lack of time to weave writing into your life. Asian American, lesbian, single mother, tugged in all directions by children, lover, or ex-husband, and the writing.

It is not easy writing this letter. It began as a poem, a long poem. I tried to turn it into an essay but the result was wooden, cold. I have not yet unlearned the esoteric bullshit and pseudo-intellectualizing that school brainwashed into my writing.

How to begin again. How to approximate the intimacy and immediacy I want. What form? A letter, of course.

My dear hermanas, the dangers we face as women writers of color are not the same as those of white women, though we have many in common. We don't have as much to lose-we never had any privileges. I wanted to call the dangers "obstacles," but that would be a kind of lying. We can't transcend the dangers, can't rise above them. We must go through them and hope we won't have to repeat the performance.

Unlikely to be friends of people in high literary places, the beginning woman of color is invisible both in the white male mainstream world and in the white women's feminist world, though in the latter this is gradually changing. The lesbian of color is not only invisible, she doesn't even exist. Our speech, too, is inaudible. We speak in tongues like the outcast and the insane.

Because white eyes do not want to know us, they do not bother to learn our language, the language which reflects us, our culture, our spirit. The schools we attended or didn't attend did not give us the skills for writing nor the confidence that we were correct in using our class and ethnic languages. I, for one, became adept at, and majored in, English to spite, to show up, the arrogant racist teachers who thought all Chicano children were dumb and dirty. And Spanish was not taught in grade school. And Spanish was not required in high school. And though now I write my poems in Spanish as well as English I feel the rip-off of my native tongue.

I lack imagination you say No. I lack language. The language to clarify my resistance to the literate. Words are a war to me. They threaten my family. To gain the word to describe the loss I risk losing everything. I may create a monster the word's length and body swelling up colorful and thrilling looming over my mother, characterized. Her voice in the distance unintelligible illiterate. These are the monster's words. -CHERRIE MORAGA

Who gave us permission to perform the act of writing? Why does writing seem so unnatural for me? I'll do anything to postpone it-empty the trash, answer the telephone. The voice recurs in me: Who am I, a poor Chicanita from the sticks, to think I could write? How dare I even considered becoming a writer as I stooped over the tomato fields bending, bending under the hot sun, hands broadened and calloused, not fit to hold the quill, numbed into an animal stupor by the heat.

How hard it is for us to think we can choose to become writers, much less feel and believe that we can. What have we to contribute, to give? Our own expectations condition us. Does not our class, our culture as well as the white man tell us writing is not for women such as us?

The white man speaks: Perhaps if you scrape the dark off of your face. Maybe f you bleach your bones. Stop speaking in tongues, stop writing left-handed. Don't cultivate your colored skins nor tongues of fire if you want to make it in a right-handed world.

"Man, like all the other animals, fears and is repelled by that which he does not understand, and mere difference is apt to connote something malign."-ALICE WALKER

I think, yes, perhaps if we go to the university. Perhaps if we become male-women or as middleclass as we can. Perhaps if we give up loving women, we will be worthy of having something to say worth saying. They convince us that we must cultivate art for art's sake. Bow down to the sacred bull, form. Put frames and metaframes around the writing. Achieve distance in order to win the coveted title "literary writer" or "professional writer." Above all do not be simple, direct, nor immediate.

Why do they fight us? Because they think we are dangerous beasts? Why are we dangerous beasts? Because we shake and often break the whites' comfortable stereotypic images they have of us: the Black domestic, the lumbering nanny with twelve babies sucking her tits, the-slant-eyed Chinese with her expert hand-"They know how to treat a man in bed," the flat-faced Chicana or Indian, passively lying on her back, being fucked by the Man a la La Chingada.

The Third World woman revolts: We revoke, we erase your white male imprint. When you come knocking on our doors with your rubber stamps to brand our faces with DUMB, HYSTERICAL, PASSIVE PUTA, PERVERT, when you come with your branding irons to burn MY PROPERTY on our buttocks, we will vomit the guilt, self-denial, and race-hatred you have force-fed into us right back into your mouth. We are done being cushions for your projected fears. We are tired of being your sacrificial lambs and scapegoats.

I can write this, and yet I realize that many of us women of color who have strung degrees, credentials, and published books around our necks like pearls that we hang onto for dear life are in danger of contributing to the invisibility of our sister-writers. "La Vendida," the sell-out.

The danger of selling out one's own ideologies. For the Third World woman who has, at best, one foot in the feminist literary world, the temptation is great to adopt the current feeling fads and theory fads, the latest half truths in political thought, the half-digested new age psychological axioms that are preached by the white feminist establishment. Its followers are notorious for "adopting" women of color as their "cause" while still expecting us to adapt to their expectations and their language.

How dare we get out of our colored faces. How dare we reveal the human flesh underneath and bleed red blood like the white folks. It takes tremendous energy and courage not to acquiesce, not to capitulate to a definition of feminism that still renders most of us invisible. Even as I write this I am disturbed that I am the only Third World woman writer in this handbook. Over and over I have found myself to be the only Third World woman at readings, workshops, and meetings.

We cannot allow ourselves to be tokenized. We must make our own writing and that of Third World women the first priority. We cannot educate white women and take them by the hand. Most of us are willing to help, but we can't do the white woman's homework for her. That's an energy drain. More times than she cares to remember, Nellie Wong, Asian American feminist writer, has been called by white women wanting a list of Asian American women who can give readings or workshops. We are in danger of being reduced to purveyors of resource lists.

Coming face to face with one's limitations. There are only so many things I can do in one day. Luisah Teish, addressing a group of predominantly white feminist writers, had this to say of Third World women's experience:

If you are not caught in the maze that [we] are in, it's very difficult to explain to you the hours in the day we do not have. And the hours that we do not have are hours that are translated into survival skills and money. And when one of those hours is taken away it means an hour that we don't have to lie back and stare at the ceiling or an hour that we don't have to talk to a friend. For me it's a loaf of bread.

(Continues...)



Excerpted from The Gloria Anzaldúa Reader by GLORIA E. ANZALDÚA Copyright © 2009 by Duke University Press. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Table of Contents

Contents

Editor's Acknowledgments....................ix
Introduction: Reading Gloria Anzaldúa, Reading Ourselves ... Complex Intimacies, Intricate Connections....................1
TIHUEQUE....................19
To Delia, Who Failed on Principles....................20
Reincarnation....................21
The Occupant....................22
I Want To Be Shocked Shitless....................23
The New Speakers....................24
Speaking in Tongues: A Letter to Third World Women Writers....................26
The coming of el mundo surdo....................36
La Prieta....................38
El paisano is a bird of good omen....................51
Dream of the Double-Faced Woman....................70
Foreword to the Second Edition (of This Bridge Called My Back)....................72
Spirituality, Sexuality, and the Body: An Interview with Linda Smuckler....................74
Enemy of the State....................97
Del Otro Lado....................99
Encountering the Medusa....................101
Creativity and Switching Modes of Consciousness....................103
En Rapport, In Opposition: Cobrando cuentas a las nuestras....................111
The Presence....................119
Metaphors in the Tradition of the Shaman....................121
Haciendo caras, una entrada....................124
Bridge, Drawbridge, Sandbar, or Island: Lesbians-of-Color Hacienda Alianzas....................140
Ghost Trap/Trampa de espanto....................157
To(o) Queer the Writer-Loca, escritora y chicana....................163
Border Arte: Nepantla, el Lugar de la Frontera....................176
On the Process of Writing Borderlands / La Frontera....................187
La vulva es una herida abierta / The vulva is an open wound....................198
The New Mestiza Nation: A Multicultural Movement....................203
Part Three Gallery of Images....................217
Foreword to Cassell's Encyclopedia of Queer Myth, Symbol and Spirit....................229
How to....................232
Memoir-My Calling; or, Notes for "How Prieta Came to Write"....................235
When I write I hover....................238
Transforming American Studies: 2001 Bode-Pearson Prize Acceptance Speech....................239
Yemayá....................242
(Un)natural bridges, (Un)safe spaces....................243
Healing wounds....................249
Reading LP....................250
A Short Q & A between LP and Her Author (GEA)....................274
Like a spider in her web....................276
Bearing Witness: Their Eyes Anticipate the Healing....................277
The Postmodern Llorona....................280
Speaking across the Divide....................282
Llorona Coyolxauhqui....................295
Disability & Identity: An E-mail Exchange & a Few Additional Thoughts....................298
Let us be the healing of the wound: The Coyolxauhqui imperative-la sombra y el sueño....................303
Appendix 1: Glossary....................319
Appendix 2: Timeline: Some Highlights from Gloria Evangelina Anzaldúa's Life....................325
Bibliography....................337
Index....................351
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