The God Argument: The Case Against Religion and for Humanism

The God Argument: The Case Against Religion and for Humanism

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by A. C. Grayling
     
 

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What are the arguments for and against religion and religious belief--all of them--right across the range of reasons and motives that people have for being religious, and do they stand up to scrutiny? Can there be a clear, full statement of these arguments that once and for all will show what is at stake in this debate?

Equally important: what is the… See more details below

Overview

What are the arguments for and against religion and religious belief--all of them--right across the range of reasons and motives that people have for being religious, and do they stand up to scrutiny? Can there be a clear, full statement of these arguments that once and for all will show what is at stake in this debate?

Equally important: what is the alternative to religion as a view of the world and a foundation for morality? Is there a worldview and a code of life for thoughtful people--those who wish to live with intellectual integrity, based on reason, evidence, and a desire to do and be good--that does not interfere with people's right to their own beliefs and freedom of expression?

In The Case Against Religion, Anthony Grayling offers a definitive examination of these questions, and an in-depth exploration of the humanist outlook that recommends itself as the ethics of the genuinely reflective person.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
The newest offering by prolific English philosopher Grayling (Master, New Coll. of the Humanities, London; The Good Book: A Humanist Bible) is essentially two books in one. The first part is a now fairly standard atheistic critique of religion, in the vein of Richard Dawkins, in which Grayling viciously attacks religion at its root, sparing not even moderate believers. Along the way, he assesses the teleological, ontological, and cosmological arguments for the existence of God, as well as Pascal's Wager. The second part is a positive argument in support of humanism as an approach to ethics, which calls to mind the life and writings of philosopher Paul Kurtz. Drawing largely from classical Greek philosophy, Grayling lays out one potential path (among others) to a life of meaning, value, and virtue without God. A highlight is the section about death and dying from a humanistic perspective. VERDICT Grayling's evisceration of even the moderately religious will unnecessarily alienate many potential readers and partners in his humanistic vision. Recommended for fans of Dawkins, Christopher Hitchens, and Sam Harris.—Brian Sullivan, Alfred Univ. Lib., NY

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781620401910
Publisher:
Bloomsbury USA
Publication date:
03/26/2013
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
288
Sales rank:
430,040
File size:
0 MB

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