The God Problem: How a Godless Cosmos Creates [NOOK Book]

Overview

God’s war crimes, Aristotle’s sneaky tricks, Einstein’s pajamas, information theory’s blind spot, Stephen Wolfram’s new kind of science, and six monkeys at six typewriters getting it wrong. What do these have to do with the birth of a universe and with your need for meaning? Everything, as you’re about to see.

How does the cosmos do something it has long been thought only ...
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The God Problem: How a Godless Cosmos Creates

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Overview

God’s war crimes, Aristotle’s sneaky tricks, Einstein’s pajamas, information theory’s blind spot, Stephen Wolfram’s new kind of science, and six monkeys at six typewriters getting it wrong. What do these have to do with the birth of a universe and with your need for meaning? Everything, as you’re about to see.

How does the cosmos do something it has long been thought only gods could achieve? How does an inanimate universe generate stunning new forms and unbelievable new powers without a creator? How does the cosmos create?

That’s the central question of this book, which finds clues in strange places. Why A does not equal A. Why one plus one does not equal two. How the Greeks used kickballs to reinvent the universe. And the reason that Polish-born Benoît Mandelbrot—the father of fractal geometry—rebelled against his uncle.

You’ll take a scientific expedition into the secret heart of a cosmos you’ve never seen. Not just any cosmos. An electrifyingly inventive cosmos. An obsessive-compulsive cosmos. A driven, ambitious cosmos. A cosmos of colossal shocks. A cosmos of screaming, stunning surprise. A cosmos that breaks five of science’s most sacred laws. Yes, five. And you’ll be rewarded with author Howard Bloom’s provocative new theory of the beginning, middle, and end of the universe—the Bloom toroidal model, also known as the big bagel theory—which explains two of the biggest mysteries in physics: dark energy and why, if antimatter and matter are created in equal amounts, there is so little antimatter in this universe.

Called "truly awesome" by Nobel Prize–winner Dudley Herschbach, The God Problem will pull you in with the irresistible attraction of a black hole and spit you out again enlightened with the force of a big bang. Be prepared to have your mind blown.


From the Hardcover edition.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781616145521
  • Publisher: Prometheus Books
  • Publication date: 8/30/2012
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Sales rank: 420,248
  • File size: 5 MB

Meet the Author

Howard Bloom has been called "the Darwin, Newton, Einstein, and Freud of the twenty-first century" and "the next Stephen Hawking." He is the author of The Genius of the Beast: A Radical Re-Vision of Capitalism ("impressive, stimulating, and tremendously enjoyable"—James Fallows, national correspondent, the Atlantic Monthly); Global Brain: The Evolution of Mass Mind from the Big Bang to the 21st Century ("reassuring and sobering"—the New Yorker); and The Lucifer Principle: A Scientific Expedition into the Forces of History ("mesmerizing"—the Washington Post). A recent visiting scholar at New York University, Bloom is the founder of the International Paleopsychology Project, founder of the Space Development Steering Committee (a group that includes astronauts Buzz Aldrin and Edgar Mitchell), and a founding board member of the Epic of Evolution Society. In addition, his scientific articles have appeared in PhysicaPlus, New Ideas in Psychology, and Across Species Comparisons and Psychopathology and on arXiv.org. He has appeared on Good Morning America, the CBS Morning News, CBS News Nightwatch, CNN, the BBC, and over one hundred other media outlets.


From the Hardcover edition.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 6 )
Rating Distribution

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Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews
  • Posted December 5, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Absolutely awful. Woe to those who take on this insufferable tom

    Absolutely awful. Woe to those who take on this insufferable tome! Okay, so it's not THAT big but I slogged my way through 320 pages and finally gave up. I didn't quit due to any lack of understanding, but rather because Bloom's a terrible excuse for a writer, endlessly content to repeat himself ad nauseum and begin nearly ever damn sentence with "And!" I can't recall how many times I had the desire to close the book and hurl it across the room with all my might. And in light of the fact that I read more than half of it, all I gleaned from the precious little he had to say concerned how we create, develop and change ideas to improve the human condition. After 320 pages, I encountered nothing at all about how the  cosmos creates. Perhaps he gets to that eventually, but WHEN?????

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 13, 2013

    Worth the read if you are interested in the history of ideas, bu

    Worth the read if you are interested in the history of ideas, but ultimately does not provide a very convincing solution to the creation problem. The composition, as another reviewer put it less than kindly, is amateurish. An editor would have been nice.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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    Posted April 29, 2013

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    Posted February 24, 2013

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 28, 2012

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 16, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

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