The God Who Risks: A Theology of Divine Providence

Overview

If God is all-knowing and all-powerful, can he in any way be vulnerable to his creation?

Can God be in control of anything at all if he is not constantly in control of everything?

John Sanders says yes to both of these questions.

In The God Who Risks, he mounts a careful and challenging argument for positive answers to both of these profound theological questions. In this thoroughly revised edition, Sanders ...

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Overview

If God is all-knowing and all-powerful, can he in any way be vulnerable to his creation?

Can God be in control of anything at all if he is not constantly in control of everything?

John Sanders says yes to both of these questions.

In The God Who Risks, he mounts a careful and challenging argument for positive answers to both of these profound theological questions. In this thoroughly revised edition, Sanders clarifies his position and responds to his critics. His book will not only contribute to serious ongoing theological discussion but will enlighten pastors and laypersons who struggle with questions about suffering, evil and human free will.

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What People Are Saying

Walter Brueggemann
Dr. Sanders has waded into a deep theological issue with great learning matched by immense pastoral sensitivity. This book is an important act of courage that invites readers to new, courageous thinking.
Stephen C. Evans
Motivated by a deep desire to be faithful to biblical revelation. . . evidences a rare combination of philosophical clarity and biblical and theological erudition. Many will find things to disagree with in this book, but everyone should agree that it has significantly raised the level of discussion.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780830828371
  • Publisher: InterVarsity Press
  • Publication date: 5/25/2007
  • Edition description: REV
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 384
  • Sales rank: 832,995
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author

John Sanders (Th.D., University of South Africa) is professor of religion at Hendrix College in Conway, Arkansas. He has edited and written several books, including No Other Name: An Investigation into the Destiny of the Unevangelized. Three of his previous book projects have received a Christianity Today Book Award.
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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
1. Introduction
2. Theological Ground Rules
3. Old Testament Materials for a Relational View of Providence Involving Risk
4. New Testament Materials for a Relational View of Providence Involving Risk
5. Divine Relationality in the Christian Tradition
6. Risk and the Divine Character
7. The Nature of Divine Sovereignty
8. Applications to the Christian Life
9. Conclusion
Notes
Bibliography
Name and Subject Index
Scripture Index
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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 21, 2001

    Well Written but bad Theology

    This book proposes that the theory of the Openness of God is true. However, in my opinion, it starts from a premise that God is not Omniscient, which, also in my view, is unbiblical. However, it is a good expose' of his point of view. Both Arminians and Calvinists do not adhere to this view (see 'recommended' below).

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 15, 1999

    The God Who Fails

    While this is definetely a work worth reading one will find Sanders interpretation of Scripture upside down in relation to Classical / Historical Theology. The major fallacy lies in his interpretative model. He proceeds to build a theology from the texts in Scripture which are unclear (parables) and different from other more clear (epistle teaching) texts. With the model found within the 'God who Risks' one will discover a god who can fail and is conditioned by humanity. As noted in numerous reviews there is more wrong than just going against the grain of almost 2000 years of Christian History. Sanders view of God strikes remarkably against the very bone of Christian theology. Existentially, for me I am glad and thankful that God does know all (past, present, future, and all possible situations)and that He will not fail. This is what gives me hope and assurance!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 9, 1999

    The Christian God is at Stake in This Book

    Throughout his book, Sanders blatantly and irresponsibly caricatures the God whom Christians throughout the centuries have embraced by faith and worshiped. Does Sanders represent his ¿open theist¿ associates as a spokesman when he speaks like this? If so, are he and his fellow ¿open theists¿ consistent when they say that the traditional view of God which they oppose is part of orthodox Christianity? Here¿s the problem. Sanders portrays the God of classic Christianity to be manipulative, micromanaging, non-relational, coercive, one who forces his will upon people without consent, even one who rapes (his own word) humans by imposing his will upon them. How can ¿open theists¿ tolerate this God as anything close to Christian orthodoxy? How can such a deity be accepted by anyone? It is unconscionable and unthinkable for ¿open theists,¿ in general, and for John Sanders, in particular, to concede that belief in such a God is orthodox. Surely they ought to denounce belief in such a deity as unorthodox, and heretical. Do not John Sanders¿ characterizations of the traditional view of God, in this book, tacitly admit that orthodoxy is at stake in this whole discussion? As characterized, it is no minor issue over which John Sanders and classical Christians disagree. The issue at stake in Sanders¿ book entails two radically different views of God, or rather, two very different Gods. The whole of Christianity is under dispute.

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