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The God Who Weeps: How Mormonism Makes Sense of Life
     

The God Who Weeps: How Mormonism Makes Sense of Life

3.8 5
by Terryl L. Givens, Fiona Givens
 

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781609071882
Publisher:
Ensign Peak
Publication date:
10/15/2012
Pages:
148
Sales rank:
865,328
Product dimensions:
6.10(w) x 9.20(h) x 2.70(d)

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The God Who Weeps: How Mormonism Makes Sense of Life 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Kurt_Manwaring More than 1 year ago
As Mormons well know, a correct understanding of who God is can be just as important as believing that God is. "The God Who Weeps: How Mormonism Makes Sense of Life" looks in-depth at one of the most critical and misunderstood attributes of God — love. The book is written by Terryl and Fiona Givens. Terryl Givens has written extensively on several Mormon topics, most recently co-authoring a landmark biography of LDS Apostle Parley P. Pratt. He currently holds the James A. Bostwick chair of English at the University of Richmond. Fiona Givens hold a Master of Arts in European History and while she has worked with her husband on previous books, this is her first time sharing a byline. Most recently, she led the French language program at Patrick Henry High School. Together, Terry and Fiona have produced a thoughtful work that makes antiquated the notion women are the Christians and men the scriptorians. The "God Who Weeps" is equally fulfilling to academic and layman alike. The book explores “five propositions pertaining to who presides over this universe, where we came from, why we are here, and what might await us” in the next life. As the husband and wife team examines what God's love means for each of us, they manage to assuage the guilt of those who question while concurrently helping believers understand just how great a statement of character it truly is to believe. They write, “What we choose to embrace, to be responsive to, is the purest reflection of who we are and what we love.” Those who read this book will find it serves as a catalyst for pondering what it really means to believe in a God who “has a heart that beats in sympathy with human hearts.”
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I will be reading this again. The references and histories pull together our search for meaning.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago