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Golden Age of Song
     

The Golden Age of Song

by Jools Holland & His Rhythm & Blues Orchestra
 
Naturally, the Golden Age of Song referred to in the title of this, Jools Holland's 15th or so collection with his Rhythm & Blues Orchestra since he became a British music institution thanks to his BBC show Later..., is what is often referred to as the Great American Songbook -- the songs written in the first

Overview

Naturally, the Golden Age of Song referred to in the title of this, Jools Holland's 15th or so collection with his Rhythm & Blues Orchestra since he became a British music institution thanks to his BBC show Later..., is what is often referred to as the Great American Songbook -- the songs written in the first half of the 20th century that form the core of our musical lingua franca. These songs have been sung many, many times before -- recently, Rod Stewart relied on these tunes to revive his career, spending the better part of the decade crooning these melodies with a wink and a grin -- but they suit Holland's signature swinging style, possibly because they derive from the same origins as his jumping boogie-woogie. So, the sound and songs are familiar and so is Jools' formula. He brings in a bunch of old friends (Tom Jones, Mick Hucknall, Paul Weller) and some new sensations (Paloma Faith, Rumer, Jessie J, Florence Welch), along with a couple of singers who straddle these two categories (Joss Stone, James Morrison). A new wrinkle is the excavation of a few songs from old Hootenannys, which is a clever way to get some of the more interesting performances: Weller duetting with Amy Winehouse on "Don't Go to Strangers" in 2006, Paolo Nutini singing "Lovin' Machine," Florence Welch vamping on "My Baby Just Cares for Me," Cee Lo Green gamely (if not quite successfully) mimicking Jackie Wilson on "Reet Petite" (its inclusion bends the rules of the Great American Songbook, but who really cares), and Lily Rose Cooper when she was still going as Lily Allen tearing it up on "The Lady Is a Tramp." Outside of these cuts, this is pretty standard fare: Holland plays the boogie-woogie, his Rhythm & Blues Orchestra jumps, and the singers all acquit themselves nicely, sticking to the text, always performing with skill and sometimes spirit. Despite all this, The Golden Age of Song feels pretty similar to any other Jools Holland record you could name -- and he's had a ton of them in the last decade -- but he's a reliable entertainer, so if you've ever been pleased with him in the past you'll be satisfied with him once again.

Product Details

Release Date:
12/11/2012
Label:
Warner Bros Uk
UPC:
0825646543427
catalogNumber:
4654342

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Jools Holland & His Rhythm & Blues Orchestra   Primary Artist
Jools Holland   Piano,Group Member
Ruby Turner   Vocals,Group Member
Geraint Watkins   Accordion
Roger Goslyn   Trombone,Group Member
Sally Herbert   Violin
Laurie Latham   Percussion,Celeste,Glockenspiel
Gilson Lavis   Percussion,Drums,Group Member
Nick Lunt   Baritone Saxophone,Group Member
Winston Rollins   Trombone,Group Member
Fayyaz Virji   Trombone,Group Member
Katherine Shave   Viola
Pete Long   Tenor Saxophone
Frank Schaefer   Cello
Rico Rodriguez   Trombone,Group Member
Michael "Bami" Rose   Saxophone,Group Member
Julia Singleton   Violin
Claire Orsler   Viola
Billie Godfrey   Background Vocals
Ian Burdge   Cello
Sophie Harris   Cello
Anna Hemery   Violin
Jacqueline Norrie   Violin
Jason McDermid   Trumpet,Group Member
Bryan Chambers   Background Vocals
Simon Allen   Saxophone
Chris Storr   Trumpet,Group Member
Phil Veacock   Saxophone,Group Member
Marina Solarek   Violin
Dave Swift   Bass,Group Member
Lisa Grahame   Saxophone,Group Member
Simon Willescroft   Saxophone
Christopher Holland   Organ,Group Member
Derek Nash   Saxophone,Group Member
David Smith   Violin
Louise Marshall   Background Vocals,Group Member
Jon Scott   Trumpet,Group Member
Danny Marsden   Trumpet
Rosie Mae   Background Vocals,Group Member
Mark Flanagan   Group Member
Robbie Harvey   Trombone
Kirsten Klingels   Violin
Dinah Bearmish   Cello
Alister White   Trombone
Tim Wilford   Violin
Sharada Mack   Viola
Jenny Thurston   Violin
Paul Fisher   Trombone

Technical Credits

Etta James   Composer
Jools Holland   Composer
Brenda Russell   Composer
Harold Arlen   Composer
Noël Coward   Composer
Richard Rodgers   Composer
Henry Bernard   Composer
Sammy Cahn   Composer
Tyran Carlo   Composer
Saul Chaplin   Composer
Walter Donaldson   Composer
Dubin   Composer
Duke Ellington   Composer
Redd Evans   Composer
Mark Fisher   Composer
Joe Goodwin   Composer
Berry Gordy   Composer
Lorenz Hart   Composer
Jacob Jacobs   Composer
Gus Kahn   Composer
Laurie Latham   Producer,Engineer,Additional Production
Leroy Kirkland   Composer
Johnny Mercer   Composer
Harry Warren   Composer
Paul Webster   Composer
Dave Mann   Composer
Arthur Kent   Composer
Larry Shay   Composer
Lois Mann   Composer
Sholom Secunda   Composer
Henry Thurston   Composer
Pearl Woods   Composer
Morry Burns   Composer
Bryan Wells   Composer
Liberty Ellman   Vocal Engineer
Jason McDermid   Horn Arrangements
Ron Burrow   Engineer,Pro-Tools,Additional Production
Phil Veacock   Horn Arrangements,String Arrangements
Mark Cooper   Producer
Jonathan Scott   Horn Arrangements
Derek Nash   Engineer,Horn Arrangements
Gregory Porter   Composer
O. Merritt   Composer
William McDade   Composer
Jon Scott   Horn Arrangements
D. Lambert   Composer
Janet Fraser Crook   Director
Mary McCartney   Cover Photo
Ronald Miller   Composer
Allison Howe   Producer

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