The Golden Ass

Overview

Written towards the end of the second century AD, The Golden Ass tells the story of the many adventures of a young man whose fascination with witchcraft leads him to be transformed into a donkey. The bewitched Lucius passes from owner to owner - encountering a desperate gang of robbers and being forced to perform lewd 'human' tricks on stage - until the Goddess Isis finally breaks the spell and Lucius is initiated into her cult. Apuleius' enchanting story has inspired generations of writers such as Boccaccio, ...

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Overview

Written towards the end of the second century AD, The Golden Ass tells the story of the many adventures of a young man whose fascination with witchcraft leads him to be transformed into a donkey. The bewitched Lucius passes from owner to owner - encountering a desperate gang of robbers and being forced to perform lewd 'human' tricks on stage - until the Goddess Isis finally breaks the spell and Lucius is initiated into her cult. Apuleius' enchanting story has inspired generations of writers such as Boccaccio, Shakespeare, Cervantes and Keats with its dazzling combination of allegory, satire, bawdiness and sheer exuberance, and remains the most continuously and accessibly amusing book to have survived from Classical antiquity.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780140435900
  • Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 1/28/1999
  • Series: Penguin Classics Series
  • Pages: 304
  • Sales rank: 202,154
  • Product dimensions: 5.09 (w) x 7.79 (h) x 0.77 (d)

Meet the Author

Lucius Apuleius (2nd Century AD) North African fubulist, who Latinized the Greek myths and legends. He travelled widely, visiting Italy, Asia &c and was there initiated into numerous religious mysteries. The knowledge which he thus acquired of the priestly fraternities he drew on for his Golden Ass. E.J. Kenney is Emeritus Kennedy Professor of Latin in the University of Cambridge. His publications include a critical edition of Ovid's amatory works. He is a Fellow of the British Academy.

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Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 17, 2001

    those crazy Romans

    Reading this book was one of the highlights of my ancient history class. Apuleius paints a vivid picture of Roman society while telling this 'Grecian' tale. While there are innumerable sexual episodes that may be shocking to a modern reader, they were quite the norm at the time and make the book that much more interesting. As well as being extremely entertaining, this book is a witty social commentary that demonstrates typical male Roman attitudes. Sexist? A bit. Obscene? At times. Worth reading? Absolutely.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 23, 2012

    Ruden's translation is a delight

    "The Golden Ass" is a rowdy, bawdy book with the exquisite myth of Cupid and Psyche retold in the middle. I've loved Robert Graves' translation for years, but Sarah Ruden's translation is lively and luscious. It's an excellent read!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 3, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 16, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews

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