The Golden Locket

The Golden Locket

by Carol Greene, Marcia Sewall
     
 

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Hoping to avoid the worry of caring for a valuable object, Miss Teaberry gives away the locket her cat finds in the garden, only to find herself enmeshed in a situation of escalating chaos.  See more details below

Overview

Hoping to avoid the worry of caring for a valuable object, Miss Teaberry gives away the locket her cat finds in the garden, only to find herself enmeshed in a situation of escalating chaos.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Miss Teaberry leads a simple life, until her cat finds a golden locket. After losing a day's work trying on dresses to go with it and a night's sleep worrying about burglars, she decides to give the bauble, anonymously, to the ``enchanting young girl in the town down the road.'' She thus sets in motion a seemingly neverending succession of gifts received in return--from puppies to a parrot to a flea-ridden ox, each of which proves more troublesome than its predecessor. The harried heroine's solution provides a warm-hearted, satisfying cap to this whimsical, albeit overlong, cumulative tale. Though some children may enjoy the repetition here, it may strike others as too much of a good thing. Greene's crisp narrative suits the plot's agility and ironies, while Sewall's folksy gouache and ink artwork adds its own wit and rustic charm. Ages 4-8. (Mar.)
School Library Journal
K-Gr 3-- While weeding her zinnias, Miss Teaberry finds a gold locket in her garden, and this is the beginning of her troubles. She wastes a day trying to find a dress in her wardrobe fancy enough for it, she stays awake all night guarding it from possible robbers, and then gives it to the milkman, with instructions to give it to an ``enchanting young girl'' from her ``secret admirer.'' The girl sends back a basket of puppies, distracting and destructive, whom Miss Teaberry gives to the milkman to hand off to a ``winsome young boy'' who reciprocates with a parrot. After more rounds of exchanges including a horse and an ox, Miss Teaberry and the milkman contrive to unite the couple and give Miss Teaberry back the peace she needs to return to her zinnias. Told in simple prose with opaque watercolor illustrations, the cumulative story has the motion and quaintness of a folktale. With its primitive, flat drawings and fantasy colors in pinks and oranges, the tale is at once modern and old fashioned. Although the medium is not at all the same, somehow the expressions and atmosphere resemble McCloskey's extreme caricatures in the ``Homer Price'' stories. Even the animals are quite expressive. This is a small jewel of a story about a quirky old lady and her silly, charming troubles. --Ruth K. MacDonald, Purdue University Calumet, Hammond, IN

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780152010089
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
05/15/1996
Pages:
36
Product dimensions:
10.00(w) x 9.00(h) x (d)
Age Range:
4 - 7 Years

Meet the Author


Marcia Sewall, the author and illustrator of many award-winning picture books, is a lifelong resident of New England.

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