The Golf School: The Tuition Free Tee-To-Green Curriculum from Golf's Finest High End Academy

The Golf School: The Tuition Free Tee-To-Green Curriculum from Golf's Finest High End Academy

by Jim McLean, Richard Waxberg
     
 

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Get the benefits of Jim McLean's four golf school curriculums—the Full-Swing School, the Short-Game School, the Management School, and the Mental School—without the four-figure cost.

Jim McLean is known as golf's complete teacher, and his golf schools—at The Doral Resort in Miami; PGA West in Palm Springs; Grand Traverse in Michigan; Legend

Overview

Get the benefits of Jim McLean's four golf school curriculums—the Full-Swing School, the Short-Game School, the Management School, and the Mental School—without the four-figure cost.

Jim McLean is known as golf's complete teacher, and his golf schools—at The Doral Resort in Miami; PGA West in Palm Springs; Grand Traverse in Michigan; Legend Trail Golf Club in Scotsdale; Royal Links in Las Vegas; Mariner's Point in San Francisco; and Deer Creek in Toronto—have been rated the best in the country by U.S. News & World Report. Blending McLean's expert advice with over two hundred photographs detailing the syllabus of his exceptionally popular teaching facilities, Golf School is the must-have instructional for the tens of thousands of McLean's graduates and an irresistible and affordable golf bible for all those who dream of one day breaking eighty.

Golf School is for every level of play. High handicappers and beginners can all benefit from McLean's detailed study of the fundamentals of golf—grip, stance, posture, aim, and alignment. Low handicappers will be drawn to the author's advice on the mental game, course management, and how to become a "player"—someone capable of firing rounds in the sixties. In addition to the basics and the more advanced elements of the game, McLean shares his secrets for attaining consistency on the links with pre- and post-round practice tips and homework assignments designed to complete between rounds.

No other golf instructor has brought the golf school experience to the written page. For the first time, golfers will be able to attend a golf school tuition-free with one of the greatestliving teachers from the comfort of their own backyards.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780385492874
Publisher:
Doubleday Publishing
Publication date:
07/01/1999
Pages:
288
Product dimensions:
7.64(w) x 9.46(h) x 0.83(d)

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Read an Excerpt

Three Steps to Improvement

The Jim McLean system we use in our schools really boils down to a pretty simple three-step plan for getting better. Every instructor goes through this simple pattern with every student as we make necessary changes. Those steps are (1) What am I doing now? Today, on this date, what exactly am I doing? Not what I hope I'm doing, not what I think I'm doing, not what I was doing last year, but what I'm actually doing at the moment. (2) What should I do instead? If a Supreme Being appeared and granted me any golf swing I wanted, could I demonstrate it or even explain it? Probably not. More realistically, what should I do to correct the flaws I have and improve to the point where I have a swing that works effectively? (3) Finally, how do I make the change? Here is where this book comes in. In it are the concepts that will help you make the necessary changes.

Of course, that requires a very clear understanding of your golf swing and your areas of strength and weakness. Most amateurs don't have that understanding, simply because they've never taken time to analyze carefully what they do right or wrong, or because they don't know what in the swing causes good or bad results. Ideally, use a good camcorder and a VCR so you can tape your swing, and use the information in this book to critique it. Remember, there are three other areas of the game for your self-critique as well. In our schools, we use video and a computer system to determine your swing faults. You can't take advantage of that, but you can take your own video and compare it to the positions you see in the photographs in this book.

And you definitely should sit down for an houror so and honestly assess how you play golf. Ask yourself some hard questions, and don't fudge on the answers. Here's a sample list:


  • What is your best score in the last year?
  • What is your best score ever?
  • What is your current handicap?
  • What is the lowest your handicap has ever been?
  • How often do you play?
  • Do you warm up and hit practice balls before you play?
  • How often do you practice?
  • What is the average length of your practice sessions?
  • What percentage of your practice time is given to the long game and to the short game?
  • Are you a good driver? How many fairways do you hit per round? How far do you carry your tee shots with a driver? What is your average driving distance, carry and roll, under normal circumstances? (Be honest with this because it's critical. If you're not sure, go out on a fairway late some evening, hit several balls, arid step them off.) Do you hit the ball high (too high?) or low (too low?)?
  • Have you always been a good driver--or a bad driver?
  • What type of driver do you use? Is the loft and the weighting correct for your typical ball flight?
  • What are your normal shot tendencies? Do you fade ball slightly from left to right? Do you slice it badly? Do you push the ball to the right? Do you draw the ball slightly from right to left? Do you hook it? Do you pull it to the left? Is your normal shot a combination of any of these? What is your bad-shot tendency?
  • How is your iron play? How many greens do: you hit in regulation each round? If that number is low, is it because bad driving leaves you in a poor position, or is it because of poor iron shots?
  • How good or bad is your short game from off the green? From a reasonable distance around the green, how many times do you get up and down in two, out of how many chances during the course of a round? Do you have trouble pitching the ball? Are your chip shots finishing too far from the hole? What percentage of your bunker shots do you get out and on the green on the first try? What percentage of the time do you get up and down in two? What is your biggest problem in the bunker, skulling it over the green or hitting the shot fat and leaving it in the sand?
  • How good a putter are you really? How many three-putts do you average each round? Do your long putts tend to wind up long or short? What percentage of your three- and four-foot putts do you make? Do you tend to miss your putts to the right or to the left? Do you have trouble reading greens--are you often surprised when the putt breaks less or more than you anticipated?
  • How good is your course management? In retrospect, how many strokes did you waste with ill advised shot selections? How many strokes do you waste by taking low-percentage gambles instead of playing the high-percentage safe shot? How many times a round do you play a shot that you haven't practiced or are not particularly skilled at, rather than a safer shot that you know you can make and that will put you in a decent position for your next shot?
  • How does your on-course ball-striking compare with that on the practice tee?
  • Are you able to relax on the golf course, or are you extremely nervous?
  • What techniques do you use to relax?
  • Do you visualize your shots?
  • Do you have an image of your golf swing?
  • How mentally tough are you? How do you handle pressured situations? Does self doubt creep in? Do you become overly nervous under pressure? Do you let your mind wander to the consequences rather than focusing on executing the shot at hand?

These are the basic questions you need to ask yourself. Many others will help you further analyze your swing and playing tendencies. Armed with honest answers, you then can find information in this book that will help you work on and improve your most serious problems.

Meet the Author

Jim McLean's résumé includes PGA National Teacher of the Year, Master Teaching Professional for Golf magazine, Instruction Advisor for Golf Digest from 1990 to 1997, and Instruction Editor for the Golf Channel and America Online. He is also the personal coach for many PGA tour pros, including Tom Kite, Brad Faxon, Len Mattiace, Dana Quigley, and Cristie Kerr. His previous bestselling instruction books include The Golf Digest Book of Drills and The Eight-Step Swing, voted by Sports Illustrated as one of the top golf instructional books of all time. He lives in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida.

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