The Good Fight [NOOK Book]

Overview

Jerry Lincoln has a problem: his Sioux Falls IT consulting business has more work than one man can handle. Luckily, that means he can hire some help. Jerry just hopes his new employee, John Black Raven, ends up being more helpful than distracting—but John’s deep eyes and long hair are very distracting.

John came to town for an education and a chance at a life he couldn’t have on the reservation, but what’s important to him now is getting a ...
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The Good Fight

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Overview

Jerry Lincoln has a problem: his Sioux Falls IT consulting business has more work than one man can handle. Luckily, that means he can hire some help. Jerry just hopes his new employee, John Black Raven, ends up being more helpful than distracting—but John’s deep eyes and long hair are very distracting.

John came to town for an education and a chance at a life he couldn’t have on the reservation, but what’s important to him now is getting a job and keeping it. Six months ago, his sister died, and now her children are in foster care. Despite having the law on his side, John can’t get custody—can’t even see his niece and nephew.

As Jerry and John grow closer, John discovers he doesn’t have to struggle alone. Jerry helps him win visitation rights and provides much-needed support. Yet their victories aren’t without setbacks. Child Services is tangled up with money, politics, and red tape, and Native American children are their bread and butter. But John and Jerry are determined to fight the good fight and to win—in more ways than one.
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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940015138061
  • Publisher: Dreamspinner Press
  • Publication date: 9/3/2012
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 200
  • Sales rank: 148,012
  • File size: 2 MB

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 8 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(3)

4 Star

(3)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

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Sort by: Showing all of 8 Customer Reviews
  • Posted September 23, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Great romance made better by the Native American/Child services struggle.

    In The Good Fight I got to peek into the life of John Black Raven. Not surprisingly, he does encounter discrimination as a Native American. I expected to read about the commonly known problems of poverty on reservations, lack of job opportunities and the loss of culture and traditions. I was surprised when the author tackled a problem I knew nothing about, the politics of Child Services in South Dakota removing Native American children from their homes and the almost-insurmountable obstacles the families must overcome to get those children back. John Black Raven is battling to get his niece and nephew out of the system. At first, John seems cold, standoffish and extremely wary of white people. I immediately wanted to know his story and the reason behind his anger. He's not an easy guy to know, so it takes him a while to open up. It was worth the wait for me and I liked him. Jerry is the guy that manages to break through the walls John has built to protect himself. What I loved about Jerry is that he's just as clueless as me. He has been living in his own world and is jolted out of it when he meets John. Jerry doesn't swoop in and save the day for John, he offers him friendship, love and support. I'm not a fan of alpha-male hero types, I much prefer the good guy with his heart in the right place trying to do his best. That's Jerry. The romance between John and Jerry was great. I was drawn to them as a couple and felt the love they had for one another. They were the right balance of reality and sweetness for me. Their relationship wasn't perfect, which is a good thing because I hate perfect. The star of the book though was the cultural divide and getting the kids out of the foster care system. I learned something while reading this book. I was both fascinated and appalled at the same time, but had the romance to distract me when I needed it. *Reviews by Jessewave blog was provided a copy of this book by the publisher in return for an honest review.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 12, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    This was good. I liked Jerry, although I was a little disappoint

    This was good. I liked Jerry, although I was a little disappointed when I realized we weren't going to see John's POV as well. I liked these guys in general, as well as together. It was disturbing and eye opening to learn of some of the troubles that Native Americans still go through in this country. Aside from the romance, I was glad they focused mainly on the kid side-plot.

    I think the thing that kept this from being a 5 star for me was the dialogue. When I'm reading, I imagine a RL person actually saying the things the characters are saying, so when it feels awkward or unnatural that is a bit of a pet peeve for me. For the most part this wasn't a problem, and the sex scenes were hot with a little dirty talk. But some of the "My Warrior" stuff got to be a little too much for me and just started to feel weird. Although the ending was sweet, it went a little overboard on the no-seriously-I-love-you-SO-MUCH!!! We get it.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 8, 2013

    Enjoyable - Typical Andrew Grey

    This is a stand-alone novel, not one of his series. Although the characters are great, as someone who is actually Lakota Sioux, I found his depiction of his Native Americans a bit stereotypical. Still, it was a good read and I don't regret the time reading or the money spent for the NookBook.

    Erotica - M/M

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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    Posted September 22, 2012

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