The Good Housekeeping Children's Cookbook

The Good Housekeeping Children's Cookbook

by Good Housekeeping, Marianne Zanzarella
     
 
For nearly a century, the Good Housekeeping Cookbook has been the #1 reference for cooks. Now The Good Housekeeping Illustrated Children's Cookbook follows in the tradition of that kitchen classic with a lavishly illustrated cookbook for young cooks. More than 50 recipes for mouthwatering dishes that are fun and easy to prepare accompany a Cooking Basics section, a

Overview

For nearly a century, the Good Housekeeping Cookbook has been the #1 reference for cooks. Now The Good Housekeeping Illustrated Children's Cookbook follows in the tradition of that kitchen classic with a lavishly illustrated cookbook for young cooks. More than 50 recipes for mouthwatering dishes that are fun and easy to prepare accompany a Cooking Basics section, a Glossary of cooking terms, safety symbols, and more. 160+ color photos.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Deborah Zink Roffino
For kids, the kitchen is a laboratory full of science fun and culinary delights; the rewards-like the calories-are uncountable. Use this impressive edition to begin your adventures with kids in the kitchen. Instructional, tantalizing photographs alternate with precise directions in this fundamental manual that covers breakfast through dinner and all the snacks in between. Excellent chapters on safety and using the proper tools.
School Library Journal
Gr 4-6This offering is comparable in many ways to Better Homes and Gardens New Junior Cook Book (Better Homes and Gardens Bks., 1989) and Angela Wilkes's The Children's Step-by-Step Cookbook (DK, 1994). All three are general, beginning cookbooks for approximately the same audience, illustrated with full-color photographs that show children cooking and eating, and/or how and what to cook. Each title has about 50 recipes that are more-or-less simple, nutritious, and likely to be enjoyed by this age group. Directions in all of the books are clear, and are logically and attractively arranged. Good Housekeeping, however, places an emphasis on safety and cooking methods: a 22-page introduction gives thorough details about the dangers of sharp utensils, bacteria, and heat, followed by the importance of precise measurement, etc. Children who actually read all of this instead of going straight to the recipes may be frightened away by the many possibilities of failure or bodily harm. Another way of looking at this presentation is that the author takes no cooking knowledge for granted, but explains in detail every move beginning cooks must make in order to insure a successful dish. This is not a necessary purchase for libraries that own either of the other books, but large collections will benefit from having all three titles to accommodate the various tastes of budding young chefs.Carolyn Jenks, First Parish Unitarian Church, Portland, ME

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780688133757
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
09/28/1997
Pages:
176
Product dimensions:
8.79(w) x 11.26(h) x 0.69(d)
Age Range:
8 Years

Read an Excerpt

Cooking is a lot of fun! But before you start pulling out measuring cups and mixing bowls, take a few minutes to read through this section.

PREPARING TO COOK
Here's how to get yourself ready to cook.

Always read through the entire recipe before you start to cook. It is a good idea to do this with an adult. That way you can discuss any help you may need while preparing or cooking the recipe and can make sure that you understand the directions.

Discuss the "rules of the kitchen" with an adult. For example, are you allowed to use the stove or oven without supervision? Do you handle a knife safely enough to use it by yourself? And be sure to check whether it is a suitable time for you to be cooking. You may not be able to bake cookies if the dinner roast is ready to go in the oven!

Check your refrigerator and cupboards to be sure that you have all the necessary ingredients and equipment on hand. If you are missing any ingredients you must have to complete the recipe, make a grocery list, noting exactly how much of each item you need to purchase. That way you won't buy too much or too little. If you don't have all the equipment mentioned in the recipe's utensils list, an adult may be able to help you make substitutions.

Since it is much easier to cook when you have a clean and uncluttered work space, take the time to clear off an area so you won't feel crowded.

Use a wooden or plastic cutting board for food preparation. A cutting board protects your countertop or work surface from scratches and possible dents, and it protects your knives. Also, hard surfaces, such as glass, ceramic tile, or metal will dull the edges of your knives. A wooden or synthetic cutting board issoft enough to cushion the edge of a knife blade and not dull it.

Copyright ) 1997 by William Morrow & Co., Inc.

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