BN.com Gift Guide

The Grasp That Reaches beyond the Grave: The Ancestral Call in Black Women's Texts

Overview

Explores Black women writers’ treatment of the ancestor figure.

The Grasp That Reaches beyond the Grave investigates the treatment of the ancestor figure in Toni Cade Bambara’s The Salt Eaters, Paule Marshall’s Praisesong for the Widow, Phyllis Alesia Perry’s Stigmata and A Sunday in June, Toni Morrison’s Beloved, Tananarive Due’s The Between, and Julie Dash’s film, Daughters of the Dust in order to understand how they draw on African cosmology and the interrelationship of ...

See more details below
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (14) from $22.77   
  • New (7) from $71.43   
  • Used (7) from $22.77   
Grasp That Reaches beyond the Grave, The

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$26.95
BN.com price

Overview

Explores Black women writers’ treatment of the ancestor figure.

The Grasp That Reaches beyond the Grave investigates the treatment of the ancestor figure in Toni Cade Bambara’s The Salt Eaters, Paule Marshall’s Praisesong for the Widow, Phyllis Alesia Perry’s Stigmata and A Sunday in June, Toni Morrison’s Beloved, Tananarive Due’s The Between, and Julie Dash’s film, Daughters of the Dust in order to understand how they draw on African cosmology and the interrelationship of ancestors, elders, and children to promote healing within the African American community. Venetria K. Patton suggests that the experience of slavery with its concomitant view of black women as “natally dead” has impacted African American women writers’ emphasis on elders and ancestors as they seek means to counteract notions of black women as somehow disconnected from the progeny of their wombs. This misperception is in part addressed via a rich kinship system, which includes the living and the dead. Patton notes an uncanny connection between depictions of elder, ancestor, and child figures in these texts and Kongo cosmology. These references suggest that these works are examples of Africanisms or African retentions, which continue to impact African American culture.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“Patton makes a compelling argument about the significance of female relationships in African American culture as illustrated through stories that focus on mothers and daughters and on other female characters who fulfill the mother role, especially in connection to historical family figures … Though several of the novels she examines have been widely analyzed, Patton provides fresh insights into the characters and potential causes for their actions.” — CHOICE

“Patton’s book examines systematically the living role of the elder and the ancestor in literary works by African American women. Bringing these roles and relationships into critical literary discourse is revelatory and real. Patton’s buttressing sources include not only those of the literary scholar, but also well-known works by scholars of African and African American art and religion. This is a wonderful and long overdue contribution.” — Joanne M. Braxton, Director, Middle Passage Project, College of William and Mary

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781438447377
  • Publisher: State University of New York Press
  • Publication date: 7/1/2013
  • Pages: 224
  • Product dimensions: 6.30 (w) x 9.20 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Meet the Author

Venetria K. Patton

Venetria K. Patton is Associate Professor of English and Director of the African American Studies and Research Center at Purdue University. She is the author of Women in Chains: The Legacy of Slavery in Black Women’s Fiction, also published by SUNY Press, and coeditor (with Maureen Honey) of Double-Take: A Revisionist Harlem Renaissance Anthology.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments

Introduction: Revising The Legacy of Kinlessness Through Elders and Ancestors

Part I Preface: The Elder as Culture Bearer

1. Othermothers as Elders and Culture Bearers in Daughters of the Dust and The Salt Eaters

Part II Preface: The Dead Are Not Dead: The Ancestral Presence

2. Ancestral Prodding in Praisesong for the Widow

3. Ancestral Disturbances in Stigmata

4. Beloved: A Ghost Story with an Ogbanje Twist

Part III Preface: The Child and Ancestor Bond

5. The Child Figure as a Means to Ancestral Knowledge in Daughters of the Dust and A Sunday in June

Conclusion: Looking Backward and Forward: The Ancestral Presence in Speculative Fiction

Notes
Bibliography
Index

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)