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The Great Big Book of Feelings
     

The Great Big Book of Feelings

by Mary Hoffman, Ros Asquith (Illustrator)
 

The book opens with the question: "How are you feeling today?" And this leads on to a spread by spread presentation of a wide range of feelings, including:

*Happy
• Sad
• Excited
• Bored
• Interested
• Angry
• Upset
• Calm
• Silly
• Lonely
• Scared
• Safe

Overview

The book opens with the question: "How are you feeling today?" And this leads on to a spread by spread presentation of a wide range of feelings, including:

*Happy
• Sad
• Excited
• Bored
• Interested
• Angry
• Upset
• Calm
• Silly
• Lonely
• Scared
• Safe *Embarrassed
• Shy
• Confident
• Worried
• Jealous
• Satisfied

The final spread is about Feeling Better because sharing and talking about feelings helps us to feel better. The approach and design follows The Great Big Book of Families, with lots of different children in lots of different situations, brief text captions and questions and plenty of humour to make sure the book is fun.Mary Hoffman and Ros Asquith look at feelings in family life, at school and everywhere with the same warmth, wit and sensitivity that they brought to their award- winning The Great Big Book of Families.

Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal
11/01/2013
PreS-Gr 2—Cheery endpapers with rows of faces and small drawings depicting a wide assortment of emotions set the tone for this lighthearted companion to The Great Big Book of Families (Dial, 2011). The first spread offers framed pictures of children's faces showing different expressions and the caption, "How do you feel today? How do you think these children are feeling?" After that, 19 feelings are showcased. The headings are fancifully drawn to correspond with each expression and are followed by an array of people who exemplify it. Short sentences explain why children might feel a certain way, and whimsical borders surround the pages to further highlight each mood. Children of various cultures and physical abilities are included in the busy watercolor drawings. The book covers many emotions familiar to youngsters, some of which are discussed on a spread (happy, sad, interested, angry, silly, lonely, etc.) and some of which are paired with other feelings (excited-bored, upset-calm, shy-confident, scared-safe). The best part of the presentation might be the validation that "you can feel lots of different things at the same time. Or lots of different ways in one day." This book is a good choice for one-on-one sharing, but Aliki's Feelings (Greenwillow, 1984) is still the gold standard.—Martha Simpson, Stratford Library Association, CT
Kirkus Reviews
2013-08-15
A smorgasbord of thoughts and pictures about a variety of feelings. "How do you feel today?" the author asks. Framed portraits, more than a dozen over one spread, show children expressing a range of feelings. "It isn't always easy to tell." (A statement belied by this array of evocative faces.) Following this introduction, several double-page spreads put a feeling at the top of the left-hand page and fill the rest with examples in text and illustration. (Some opposites, like shy and confident, merit a facing page each.) Design choices add impact; the letters of sad seem to droop within a cloud of blue, while happy has dancing letters in a field of yellow bordered by multicolor fringe. The other 13 feelings include such usual suspects as scared, silly and angry, as well as some not so often plumbed, such as satisfied, jealous and embarrassed. It all ends with a big illustration of a handful of children putting the finishing touches on a big mural of several children displaying their feelings. Thanks to the abundance of examples, the book is predictably hit-and-miss; should interested be identified as a feeling? Too, the text is sometimes starchy and seems aimed at an older audience than the illustrations. Well-intentioned but only intermittently effective. (Picture book. 3-7)
From the Publisher
-? Parents' Lounge feature - 5 positive reviews by parents. Quotes include :

'Easy-to-read yet thought-provoking.'

I enjoyed the jovial format that kept my five year olds's attention. Some feelings are hard to describe yet this book captures them beautifully.'

'My son adored this book .When he felt angry the day after reading the book, he went off and drew some pictures of steam coming out of his ears.'

'We had a great discussion around what you can do when you feel angry, instead of hurting other people. Helpful as my three year old struggles with her emotions towards her newborn baby sister.'

'There are lots of things to like about this book not east the illustrations which fill each page.'

'Everything about this book is so thoughtfully done; even the topic headings are each given a different and highly appropriate look. A great book for encouraging children to explore and reflect upon a whole range of feelings. It is a must to have in an infant or nursery class as well as being excellent for family browsing.'

'A terrific book, complemented by quirky and humorous illustrations from Ros Asquith. ?¿ This is an essential book for schools as well as being perfect for families.'

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781847802811
Publisher:
Frances Lincoln Children's Bks
Publication date:
08/27/2013
Series:
Great Big Book Series
Pages:
40
Product dimensions:
11.70(w) x 8.90(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
4 - 7 Years

Meet the Author

Ros Asquith has been a Guardian cartoonist for 20 years, and has written and illustrated over 60 books for young people, including the international bestseller, The Great Big Book of Families, with Mary Hoffman, and the Alien Schoolboy and Teenage Worrier series. She graduated from Camberwell School of Art, working as a photographer, designer and teacher before becoming a theatre critic for Time Out and the Observer, and diary writer for the TV Times. Her other titles, for Barn Owl Books, are The Roman Beanfeast and The Skiver's Guide. She has two sons and lives in north London.MARY HOFFMAN is the internationally acclaimed author of over 100 books for children, ranging from picture books to teenage fiction. Her first picture book for Frances Lincoln, Amazing Grace, has become a classic which, with its sequels in the series, has sold 1.5 million copies worldwide. Mary's other picture books for Frances Lincoln include The Colour of Home with Karin Littlewood and An Angel Just Like Me with Cornelius van Wright, as well as the hugely successful The Great Big Book of Families, The Great Big Book of Feelings, and Welcome to the Family, all with Ros Asquith. Their next title together will be The Great Big Body Book. Mary Hoffman lives in Oxfordshire. For more information about her books visit her website: www.maryhoffman.co.uk

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