The Great Depression: A Diary

Overview


When the stock market crashed in 1929, Benjamin Roth was a young lawyer in Youngstown, Ohio. After he began to grasp the magnitude of what had happened to American economic life, he decided to set down his impressions in his diary.

This collection of those entries reveals another side of the Great Depression—one lived through by ordinary, middle-class Americans, who on a daily basis grappled with a swiftly changing economy coupled with anxiety about the unknown future. Roth’s ...

See more details below
Paperback (Reprint)
$12.17
BN.com price
(Save 23%)$15.99 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (18) from $6.91   
  • New (10) from $7.23   
  • Used (8) from $6.91   
The Great Depression: A Diary

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$10.99
BN.com price
(Save 31%)$15.99 List Price

Overview


When the stock market crashed in 1929, Benjamin Roth was a young lawyer in Youngstown, Ohio. After he began to grasp the magnitude of what had happened to American economic life, he decided to set down his impressions in his diary.

This collection of those entries reveals another side of the Great Depression—one lived through by ordinary, middle-class Americans, who on a daily basis grappled with a swiftly changing economy coupled with anxiety about the unknown future. Roth’s depiction of life in time of widespread foreclosures, a schizophrenic stock market, political unrest and mass unemployment seem to speak directly to readers today.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
A Youngstown, OH, attorney during the Great Depression, Roth emerges as researcher and author in this diary, edited by his son Daniel Roth and James Ledbetter (editor, "The Big Money," Slate.com). Tracking both the social evolution in his town and the disruptions to the American economy during the 1930s and early 1940s, Roth wrote clearly, with an attorney's eye for detail about the drastic changes occurring; modern readers will see striking parallels between the economy then and now. Roth, an active Republican, clearly explained why he disagreed with New Deal policies and why he ultimately adjusted his reactions. Editors' notes add needed historical information to clarify Roth's explanations of market trends and events that might otherwise be fuzzy to today's average reader. Though the stock market quotes can become rather tedious, they are still helpful for comparing to trends historical and current. VERDICT This diary, while not rich in personal detail, is an excellent choice for those interested in the local and economic impact of the Great Depression.—Sara Miller, Atlanta-Fulton P.L. Syst., GA\
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781586489014
  • Publisher: PublicAffairs
  • Publication date: 8/31/2010
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 288
  • Sales rank: 129,133
  • Product dimensions: 6.30 (w) x 11.28 (h) x 0.76 (d)

Meet the Author


James Ledbetter is the editor of “The Big Money,” Slate.com’s web site on business and economics.

Daniel B. Roth, son of Benjamin Roth, is the chairman of the law firm of Roth, Blair, Roberts, Strasfeld & Lodge in Youngstown, Ohio.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Preface Daniel B. Roth vii

Introduction James Ledbetter xiii

Chapter 1 June 5, 1931-October 17, 1931 1

Chapter 2 October 20, 1931-November 11, 1932 33

Chapter 3 November 19, 1932-April 22, 1933 77

Chapter 4 April 26, 1933-December 28, 1933 109

Chapter 5 January 10, 1934-November 6, 1936 145

Chapter 6 December 4, 1936-September 11, 1939 185

Chapter 7 September 12, 1939-December 31, 1941 219

For Further Reading 253

Acknowledgments 255

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 9 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 28, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Compare, Contrast, Concern -- Is America Careening Into Depression

    The part of the book most disconcerting to me is the comparison of the financial situation in America now and just before the Great Depression. Listen to the words the financiers are saying now as you read read almost verbatim in the book. The book format is different from most memoirs, but does an excellent job of letting readers see and feel the emotions of this time in history.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 19, 2010

    Then and Now

    The stock market sinks to all time levels. Banks, after years of approving questionable loans, collapse under the burden of too many defaulted mortgages. The nation is in foreclosure and eventually the banks begin to close. Unemployment rises at alarming rates. Entire industries fall into receivership and the dollar is devalued. The economies of the other nations in the world market begin to mirror the United States. The voters respond by voting a very unpopular Republican out of office and vote in a Democrat who promises change.

    The year is not 2008. It's the 1930s and Benjamin Roth, a young conservative attorney in Youngstown, Ohio, begins to keep a diary chronicling the Great Depression. Through Roth's eyes the reader gets a bird's eye view of the Depression unfolding and the consequences on the national and local levels. Every entry is an education. Roth spends the rest of his life reading about economics and evaluating the events of the 1930s with the goal to determine what caused this devastation and how to prevent it from ever happening again.

    The Great Depression, A Diary is an education in global economics and fiscal responsibility. Through this book, readers gain insight into what happened 90 years ago and what is happening in our country today. Benjamin Roth proves what every high school history teacher has been saying for years, "Those who do not learn their history are doomed to repeat it."

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 29, 2009

    A remarkable document

    Reading one man's view on the Depression turns out to be more than a valuable window on that era. It is also a cautionary tale about our own.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 15, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 5, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 8, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 18, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 27, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 27, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 9 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)