Great Divide

The Great Divide

5.0 6
by Scott Stapp
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

The former Creed frontman may have allowed his ex-bandmates first shot at the listening public with their Alter Bridge project, but he more than makes up for lost time on this solo debut. The Great Divide isn’t a drastic departure from what Stapp served up in his last job -- and since he was, by and large, responsible for shaping Creed’s aesthetic, it’s no

Overview

The former Creed frontman may have allowed his ex-bandmates first shot at the listening public with their Alter Bridge project, but he more than makes up for lost time on this solo debut. The Great Divide isn’t a drastic departure from what Stapp served up in his last job -- and since he was, by and large, responsible for shaping Creed’s aesthetic, it’s no surprise. It does, however, find the singer taking things a bit further than he has in a long while, from the heaviness of riff that permeates “Reach Out” and “Fight Song” (two of the songs that address the personal problems that kept him on the sidelines in recent times) to the unvarnished spirituality that marks the title track. Stapp reaffirms his faith -- the foundation of Creed’s earliest work -- again and again on The Great Divide, but he does so in a more considered manner, giving his allegories a vibe that’s more akin to U2 than Jars of Clay. Perhaps more significant, Stapp seems to have come to the realization that not every note has to be shouted from the mountaintop, the dynamics lend a greater sense of poignancy to the more intimate songs (like the piano-driven “Broken”). While this disc is unlikely to change anyone’s opinion of Scott Stapp, the music contained within shows that he’s positioned himself on the right side of The Great Divide.

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Stephen Thomas Erlewine
On his first album since disbanding Creed in 2004 -- and his first collection of new material since the band's last album, Weathered, in 2001 -- singer/songwriter Scott Stapp strips his music back to its barest essence. Gone are the indulgent arty flourishes, such as a cameo from the Tallahassee Boys Choir, that weighed down Weathered, and all that's left on The Great Divide are layers and layers of heavy, heavy guitars, which support Stapp's guttural declarations of angst and faith. It makes for the hardest, most immediate music he's made since Creed's debut, My Own Prison, but not necessarily the best. Certainly those looking for another "With Arms Wide Open" will be a little disappointed -- there are power ballads here, but with the notable exception of "Surround Me," not only do they lack the dramatic anthemic quality that made that a huge hit, they're given somber, heavy arrangements that appeal only to the portion of his audience that prefers the Scott Stapp who channels Jim Morrison and favors loud, distorted guitars. Since the prog inflections of Weathered didn't suit Stapp's music well -- his lyrics are so earnest he needs music lacking in affectation -- this back-to-basics approach serves him relatively well, even if it inevitably feels like a bit of retreat, as if he were consciously playing to the core of his base in order to guarantee an audience for his solo work. Nevertheless, this plays well on the surface, providing Creed fans with the basic sound that the band drifted away from at the tail end of its career, even if it does leave the lingering feeling that Stapp is trying to sound like Creed on his solo debut instead of embracing the freedom of being a solo artist.

Product Details

Release Date:
05/18/2010
Label:
Imports
UPC:
5099968809423
catalogNumber:
919893
Rank:
184110

Related Subjects

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Scott Stapp   Primary Artist
Mark Archer   Drums,Group Member
John Curry   Guitar,Group Member
Mitch Burman   Bass,Group Member
Aristides Rincon   Guitar,Group Member
John Curry   Guitar
Aristides Rincon   Guitar
Mark Archer   Drums

Technical Credits

Ron Saint Germain   Producer
John Kurzweg   Producer,Engineer,Audio Production
Craig Poole   Guitar Techician
James Mills with Bailey's Nervous Kats   Videography,Documentation
Dave Gonzalez   Intern
Michael Wong   Cover Photo
Scott Stapp   Composer,Producer,Audio Production
Shepard Fairey   Artwork
Carl Stubner   Management
Mike Froedge   Drum Technician
Clarita Sanchez   Contributor
Rick Canny   Management
Pete Deboer   Engineer
Robert Selvaggio   Engineer
Billy Mullan   Intern
Jordan Rea   Intern

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

The Great Divide 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Scott Stapp's solo cd is his first cd since breaking up with Creed. I have been waiting a long time for Scott's first solo cd cause he did such a good job with Creed. This cd is going to go multi platinum in my opinion.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This album is great. So glad to see Scott back singing again. The vocals are uplifting, and he sings with all his emotion. If you liked him in Creed, than your gonna like this album even better.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I have always loved Creeds music and this is just as good. It is differant but really really good! I guess it all just comes down to the fact that Scott was Creed. I mean what would Creed have been with out him?
Guest More than 1 year ago
Absolutely WONDERFUL!!!!!! I was a major Creed head, when they broke up I tried Alter Bridge, to my dismay the lead singer didn't live up to standards. When Scott's solo album came up, again I was eager to hear. I was delighted to find it was Creed all over again!!! I think Scott Stapp is a wonderful lead singer, and I also agree this CD will go multi platinum, or at least a Grammy or two way to go Scott Stapp
Guest More than 1 year ago
Heartfelt, introspective lyrics, powerful imagery, and commanding vocals fill the former front man of Creed, Scott Stapp's debut solo album, 'The Great Divide.' Deeply reflective, this album tells a personal story from beginning to end ... one of hurt and betrayal, to internal struggle and self doubt, to one of eventual hope and strength. Stapp -- not only the soulful voice of Creed, but also an obvious driving force in Creed's innovation -- has found much to say with his latest compilation. Rock fans who give this album an honest, open-minded listen should enjoy it. Scott Stapp has proven he is far from broken.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Obviously Scott Stapp was Creed. His voice is truely one of a kind. This album should be an award winner!!